"Actor: Derek Deadman"

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  • Harry Potter - Complete 8-film Collection [Blu-ray] [2011]Harry Potter - Complete 8-film Collection | Blu Ray | (27/08/2018) from £92.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Includes both Blu-ray and 4K UHD Discs. When Harry Potter learns on his eleventh birthday that he is is, in fact, a wizard, he is quickly swept up into the spellbinding world of Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry alongside new best friends, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger. He soon discovers, though, that there is a much darker side to the wizarding world than any of them could have imagined. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Blu-ray) Capturing the Stone Ghosts of Hogwarts Yearbook Character Clips Quidditch Lesson Dragon Egg Lesson Around the World Multi-Language Clip Deleted Scenes Philosopher's Teaser Trailer Philosopher's Theatrical Trailer Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (Blu-ray) Conversation w/ JK Rowling & Steve Kloves Lockhart's Classroom: Certificates Lockhart's Classroom: Required Reading Dumbledore's Office: Building a Scene Students: Tell us about your character. Students: How has your character evolved? Students: How have you changed as an actor? Students: What was your favorite scene? Students: What do your friends think? Students: Is making the movie fun? Students: How do you all get along Professors & More: Prof. Gilderoy Lockhart Professors & More: Lucius Malfoy Professors & More: Professor Sprout Professors & More: Mrs. Molly Weasley Professors & More: Mr. Arthur Weasley Professors & More: Prof. Albus Dumbledore Professors & More: Rubeus Hagrid Professors & More: Prof. Severus Snape Professors & More: Uncle Vernon Dursley Professors & More: Aunt Petunia Dursley Professors & More: Argus Filch Professors & More: Prof. Minerva McGonagall 19 Deleted/Extended Scenes Year One at Hogwarts Theatrical Trailer Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (Blu-ray) Creating the Vision Interviews: Introduction Interviews: The Heroes Interviews: The Gryffindors Interviews: The Slytherins Interviews: Professor Lupin and Sirius Black Interviews: Prof. Dumbledore and Rubeus Hagrid Interviews: The Dursleys Interviews: The Filmmakers Hagrid's Hut: Care of Magical Creatures Hagrid's Hut: Conjuring a Scene Add'l Scenes: Trelawney's Crystal Ball Choir Practice Trailer: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone Trailer: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Trailer: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Blu-ray) Harry vs. the Horntail: The First Task In Too Deep: The Second Task The Maze: The Third Task Meet the Champions He Who Must Not be Named Preparing for the Yule Ball Conversations with the Cast Reflections on the Fourth Film Additional Scenes Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire Trailer Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (Blu-ray) Behind The Story : Hidden Secrets of FP1: DEMENTORS AT LITTLE WHINGING FP2: GRIMMAULD PLACE FP3: TONKS' FACE TRANFORMATION FP4: THE MINISTRY OF MAGIC ATRIUM FP5: NEVILLE'S CACTUS FP6: RUPERT'S GIGGLE FITS FP7: THE PAPER SWALLOW FP8: PROFESSOR UMBRIDGE FP9: PROFESSOR UMBRIDGE'S OFFICE FP10: UMBRIDGE'S SPIES FP11: THE THESTRALS FP12: HOG'S HEAD TAVERN FP13: THE ROOM OF REQUIREMENT DOOR FP14: THE ROOM OF REQUIREMENT FP15: THE INQUISITORIAL SQUAD FP16: HARRY AND CHO UNDER THE MISTLETOE FP17: KREACHER FP18: AZKABAN PRISON FP19: THE MIRROR EXPLOSION FP20: GRAWP FP21: THE WEASLEYS' FIREWORKS DISPLAY FP22: THE EXPLOSION OF DECREES FP23: THE CENTAURS OF THE FORBIDDEN FOREST FP24: THE CENTAURS TAKE UMBRIDGE FP25: THE THESTRAL FLIGHT FP26: THE HALL OF PROPHECY FP27: THE CHOREOGRAPHY OF MAGIC FP28:A WIZARDS' DUEL: VOLDEMORT VS. .. Behind the Story: Trailing Tonks Additional Scenes Fun & Games Harry Potter: The Magic of Ed.( HP6:Half Blood Prince:TH (BD) Poster Maximum Movie Mode The Millennium Bridge Shooting On Location Professor Slughorn Building Relationships Director David Yates Returns Wool#s Orphanage Ron and Lavender Kiss The Burrow Harry and Ginny#s Kiss Aragog Returns Creating the Cave Designing the Virtual Cave Environment The Inferi The Underwater Sequence Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 1 (Blu-ray) Maximum Movie Mode PiP- Maximum Movie Mode The Last Days of Privet Drive- Maximum Movie Mode Hagrid's Motorbike- Maximum Movie Mode Death Eaters Attack Cafe- Maximum Movie Mode Creating Dobby and Kreacher- Maximum Movie Mode Magical Tents!- Maximum Movie Mode The Return of Griphook- Maximum Movie Mode Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 (Blu-ray) WVGL-AX011-GREEN LANTERN:-International English HD WVLG-X2028-LEGO HARRY POTTER: YEARS 5-7:-International Game Trailer T6000062572-0019-GREEN LANTERN:-International Spanish HD Maximum Movie Mode - Blowing Up Hogwarts MMM: Walk On's MMM - PiP MMM - Aberforth Dumbledore MMM - Deathly Hallows Costume Changes MMM - Harry Returns to Hogwarts MMM - The Hogwarts Shield MMM - The Room of Requirement Set MMM - The Fiery Escape MMM - Neville's Stand MMM - Molly Takes Down Bellatrix MMM - Final Farwells from Cast and crew

  • Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Single Disc Edition) [2001]Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Single Disc Edition) | DVD | (24/10/2005) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £10.99

    The story of a boy who learns on his eleventh birthday that he is the orphaned son of two powerful wizards with unique magical powers of his own. At Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry he finds the home and family he has never had.

  • Never the Twain: The Complete Series [DVD]Never the Twain: The Complete Series | DVD | (21/10/2019) from £34.44   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Starring Donald Sinden and Windsor Davies as two curmudgeonly antique dealers, Never the Twain rapidly became one of Thames Television's most popular comedies. Created by sitcom legend Johnnie Mortimer who, with Brian Cooke, created Father Dear Father, Man About the House and George and Mildred this classic comedy was a constant favourite with the viewers throughout its whopping ten year run. Showcasing guest appearances by Honor Blackman, Gabrielle Drake, Barbara Murray, Prunella Scales and Christopher Ellison, this set contains all eleven series and the 1989 Christmas special. Simon Peel and Oliver Smallbridge are not the easiest of neighbours. Simon is a blue blooded Oxbridge snob while Oliver is a former barrowboy with a chip on his shoulder the only thing they have in common is a willingness to stoop to endless lengths to do the other down. But when Simon's son and Oliver's daughter begin to show more than a passing interest in each other, what was a mutual cold war rapidly turns into something decidedly hotter!

  • The Canterbury Tales (I Racconti di Canterbury) [1972]The Canterbury Tales (I Racconti di Canterbury) | DVD | (18/06/2001) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Italian director Pier Paolo Pasolini's film of The Canterbury Tales was one of a trilogy from the early 1970s that, like its companions The Decameron and the Arabian Nights, was an international box-office hit playing for long runs in mainstream cinemas. All of them adapt a masterpiece of literature where man becomes the moral catalyst for his own destiny. Chaucer's ribald sense of humour was a natural outlet for Pasolini's own desire to throw caution to the wind on screen, causing controversy at the time by displaying all facets of the male and female body unadorned. (Although it all looks pretty tame now, the Italian authorities were a threatening presence to Pasolini at the time.) Produced by Alberto Grimaldi with a large budget, the location scenes were filmed in many historic sites in England, notably Wells Cathedral, its crypt, and the surrounding flatlands leading toward Glastonbury, captured in early spring by Tonino Delli Colli's cinematography. The cast with Italian and English actors dubbed into Italian with English subtitles is a mixed blessing. Hugh Griffith as Sir January is one Anglo-Saxon recognisable from his role as the lecherous squire in Tom Jones, and overacts like the rest of the cast. Pasolini himself appears briefly as Chaucer in a non-speaking role that one regrets he didn't enlarge for himself in this sprawling tableaux of pilgrim's tales (Ken Russell's excesses from the same period come to mind). The musical score, an adaptation by Ennio Morricone of some traditional indigenous melodies, prefigures the early music revival by a few years and provides a stimulating soundtrack. --Adrian Edwards

  • Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Two Disc Full Screen Edition) [2001]Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Two Disc Full Screen Edition) | DVD | (11/05/2002) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £22.99

    To try and please all the fans of JK Rowling's novel was a challenge that the makers of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone met head on. The result of their efforts is one of the most lavish, beautiful and magical cinematic treats to hit our screens in years. Director Chris Columbus and screenwriter Steven Kloves (thankfully with the help of Rowling herself) prove that although you can't translate everybody's reading of this much-loved book onto the cinema screen--maybe Fluffy was a bit more Fluffy in your imagination or Hagrid (superbly played by Robbie Coltrane) a little more giant-like--it is nevertheless possible to transfer Harry's adventures with fidelity as well as superb energy and excitement. If there is a downside it's that the performances of the child leads tends to verge on the Sylvia Young-tastic in places. Nonetheless, the three young stars are both likable and watchable, showing great potential to grow into the parts as the adventures continue. The main disappointment is the substantial cutting of the ghost scenes and what promised to be a fine comic turn by John Cleese as Headless Nick, though with more Potter films on the way the ghosts will surely assume their rightful prominence later. There are, of course, some areas of the story that may frighten smaller children--such as the entrance of the evil Voldemort--and undoubtedly for any true Potter fan that cinematic entrance cannot live up to the images created in their imagination. All in all, though, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is what it should be: an unmissable treat for the whole family. On the DVD: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone really is a magical experience in this lavish two-disc set. Disc one offers the film in all its surround-sound glory along with trailers and links to the Harry Potter Web site, but, disappointingly, there's no commentary. Disc two is where the real wizardry can be found, with a vast and beautifully designed selection of special features. Entering the Great Hall a mysterious voice invites you to explore and find the secret hidden within (though it's frustrating that in some cases you have to re-enter the Hall after viewing a feature). Various options let you tour around Harry's world: from Diagon Alley to a virtual 360-degree tour of Hogwarts. The interactive component is excellent, with real thought having been put into ensuring that, instead of just the standard behind-the-scenes stuff, there is material aplenty to keep children and adults alike entertained for hours. Throughout the emphasis is on the disc's educational value: yes there are insights to be had from the film crew, but it's in the Classroom where you will find the real precious stones! --Nikki Disney "Widescreen" vs. "Full Screen" Widescreen preserves the original theatrical picture ratio of the film (Panavision 2.35:1), which will appear in "letterboxed" format on a normal TV screen. Full Screen (or "pan and scan") crops the theatrical picture to 4:3 ratio (i.e., 4 units wide by 3 units tall), which is the shape of a standard (non-widescreen) TV screen. There is no letterboxing, but up to a third of the original picture is lost.

  • Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Two Disc Widescreen Edition) [2001]Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (Two Disc Widescreen Edition) | DVD | (11/05/2002) from £22.93   |  Saving you £1.06 (4.40%)   |  RRP £23.99

    To try and please all the fans of JK Rowling's novel was a challenge that the makers of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone met head on. The result of their efforts is one of the most lavish, beautiful and magical cinematic treats to hit our screens in years. Director Chris Columbus and screenwriter Steven Kloves (thankfully with the help of Rowling herself) prove that although you can't translate everybody's reading of this much-loved book onto the cinema screen--maybe Fluffy was a bit more Fluffy in your imagination or Hagrid (superbly played by Robbie Coltrane) a little more giant-like--it is nevertheless possible to transfer Harry's adventures with fidelity as well as superb energy and excitement. If there is a downside it's that the performances of the child leads tends to verge on the Sylvia Young-tastic in places. Nonetheless, the three young stars are both likable and watchable, showing great potential to grow into the parts as the adventures continue. The main disappointment is the substantial cutting of the ghost scenes and what promised to be a fine comic turn by John Cleese as Headless Nick, though with more Potter films on the way the ghosts will surely assume their rightful prominence later. There are, of course, some areas of the story that may frighten smaller children--such as the entrance of the evil Voldemort--and undoubtedly for any true Potter fan that cinematic entrance cannot live up to the images created in their imagination. All in all, though, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is what it should be: an unmissable treat for the whole family. On the DVD: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone really is a magical experience in this lavish two-disc set. Disc one offers the film in all its surround-sound glory along with trailers and links to the Harry Potter Web site, but, disappointingly, there's no commentary. Disc two is where the real wizardry can be found, with a vast and beautifully designed selection of special features. Entering the Great Hall a mysterious voice invites you to explore and find the secret hidden within (though it's frustrating that in some cases you have to re-enter the Hall after viewing a feature). Various options let you tour around Harry's world: from Diagon Alley to a virtual 360-degree tour of Hogwarts. The interactive component is excellent, with real thought having been put into ensuring that, instead of just the standard behind-the-scenes stuff, there is material aplenty to keep children and adults alike entertained for hours. Throughout the emphasis is on the disc's educational value: yes there are insights to be had from the film crew, but it's in the Classroom where you will find the real precious stones! --Nikki Disney "Widescreen" vs. "Full Screen" Widescreen preserves the original theatrical picture ratio of the film (Panavision 2.35:1), which will appear in "letterboxed" format on a normal TV screen. Full Screen (or "pan and scan") crops the theatrical picture to 4:3 ratio (i.e., 4 units wide by 3 units tall), which is the shape of a standard (non-widescreen) TV screen. There is no letterboxing, but up to a third of the original picture is lost.

  • The Sherlock Holmes Catalogue - The Sign Of Four [1987]The Sherlock Holmes Catalogue - The Sign Of Four | DVD | (28/04/2003) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    The Sign of Four is a 1987 feature-length version of Conan Doyle's second Sherlock Holmes novel, and is faithful to the original story except in one important detail: Dr Watson (Edward Hardwicke) does not get the girl. Otherwise, the familiar tale of the death of Bartholomew Sholto and the theft of the Agra treasure is all here, featuring a snappy performance by Jeremy Brett as Holmes doing some of the finest investigative work of his career. The famous climax, a chase on the Thames in which Holmes is almost struck dead by an exotic weapon, is handled very well. Sherlockians may have a hard time not seeing Watson's romantic pursuit of Mary Morstan (Lila Kaye), his first wife according to Doyle's book, but it would hardly have been practical in the context of the long-running Granada Television series. The rest is to be enjoyed, however. --Tom Keogh

  • Honest [2000]Honest | DVD | (30/06/2003) from £8.97   |  Saving you £-2.98 (-49.70%)   |  RRP £5.99

    Three tough and sexy working class sisters intent on thieving and burgling their way out of poverty, masquerading as men

  • Never The Twain - The Complete Series 1Never The Twain - The Complete Series 1 | DVD | (04/06/2001) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Remarkably, the Johnny Mortimer-scripted series Never the Twain ran to over 50 episodes between 1981 and 1984 on ITV. It starred Donald Sinden as Simon Peel, a stuffy, upper-middle class antiques dealer who lives next door to Oliver Smallbridge (Windsor Davies of It Aint Half Hot, Mum fame), a working-class lad made good, also in the antiques trade. As the first series establishes, theirs is a prickly relationship, not just because theyre rivals in trade but also rivals for the affections of the middle-aged, comely Veronica. They are aghast when they discover their respective son and daughter plan to marry, coming on like the Capulets and Montagues of Middle England. Never the Twain is a pleasantly predictable antique of the sitcom variety, redeemed by Sinden and Davies gruff, blustery and persistent antagonism. It depicts a cosy, never-never world of "dirty weekends", huge suburban houses, borderline homophobic mirth and reliable puns on "genes" and "jeans"--the sort of series in which characters greet surprising news by spraying a mouthful of tea halfway across the room. Some will find it barely endurable, others a welcome reminder of a bygone televisual era before alternative comedy became the ubiquitous norm. This DVD contains an episode guide and picture gallery. --David Stubbs

  • Never The Twain - Series 5 and 6 - Complete [DVD] [1981]Never The Twain - Series 5 and 6 - Complete | DVD | (10/10/2011) from £26.98   |  Saving you £-6.99 (N/A%)   |  RRP £19.99

  • Never The Twain - Series 3 & 4 [DVD]Never The Twain - Series 3 & 4 | DVD | (31/12/2012) from £26.98   |  Saving you £-6.99 (N/A%)   |  RRP £19.99

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