"Actor: Doris Dowling"

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  • The Blue Dahlia [Blu-ray]The Blue Dahlia | Blu Ray | (19/09/2016) from £12.99   |  Saving you £7.00 (53.89%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Hollywood legends Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake (The Glass Key, This Gun For Hire) team up for a masterfully told tale of suspense and intrigue in the classic noir tradition. When discharged navy officer Johnny Morrison (Ladd) comes home from war to his old stomping ground in the Hollywood Hills, he is shocked to discover his wife Helen (Doris Dowling) having an affair with the proprietor of the glamorous Blue Dahlia nightclub. But when Helen is murdered and Johnny is fingered as the prime suspect, he is forced to prove his innocence, aided by a woman harbouring a dark secret, the beautiful and enigmatic Joyce (Lake). Directed by George Marshall (Destry Rides Again, How the West Was Won) from a script by acclaimed hard-boiled novelist Raymond Chandler his only produced original screenplay The Blue Dahlia sparkles with wit and old Hollywood glamour, showcasing some of the most celebrated talent of the golden age of the silver screen at their iconic best, making its high definition debut in this feature-packed release from Arrow Academy. SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation Original uncompressed PCM mono audio Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing Selected scene commentary by Frank Krutnik, author of In a Lonely Street: Film Noir, Genre, Masculinity Introduction to the film by Frank Krutnik Rare 1949 half-hour radio dramatization of The Blue Dahlia by The Screen Guild Theater, starring Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd Original theatrical trailer Extensive gallery of vintage stills and promotional materials Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Tonci Zonjic

  • The Blue DahliaThe Blue Dahlia | DVD | (12/02/2007) from £5.00   |  Saving you £4.99 (49.90%)   |  RRP £9.99

    When Johnny Morrison returns home at the end of the war he expects to receive a warm welcome from his wife. However he makes the unpleasant discovery that she's been unfaithful to him with Eddie Harwood the owner of the Blue Dahlia nightclub. After a heated and violent argument he storms out of their house. Later that night she's murdered--and Johnny winds up the prime suspect. Now to prove his innocence Johnny must find the real culprit. Among the suspects are the ruthless nightclub owner and a vicious gangster. Joyce Harwood the estranged wife of the club's proprietor lends Johnny a hand and the two fall in love while tracking down the killer. Two ex-service buddies also come to Johnny's aid: the shell-shocked Buzz Wanchek and George Copeland. Will Johnny solve the mystery before the police find him and charge him with murder? This film noir classic was Raymond Chandler's first original story written directly for the screen.

  • The Lost WeekendThe Lost Weekend | DVD | (21/02/2005) from £6.46   |  Saving you £3.53 (35.30%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Don Birnam long-time alcoholic has been ""on the wagon"" for ten days and seems to be over the worst; but his craving has just become more insidious. Evading a country weekend planned by his brother Wick and girlfriend Helen he begins a four-day bender. In flashbacks we see past events all gone wrong because of the bottle. But this bout looks like being his last...one way or the other. Winner of 4 Oscars including Best Actor Best Screenplay Best Director and Best Film.

  • The Lost Weekend [Masters of Cinema] (Ltd Edition Blu-ray Steelbook)The Lost Weekend | Blu Ray | (25/06/2012) from £28.33   |  Saving you £-5.34 (N/A%)   |  RRP £22.99

    "I'm not a drinker--I'm a drunk." These words, and the serious message behind them, were still potent enough in 1945 to shock audiences flocking to The Lost Weekend. The speaker is Don Birnam (Ray Milland), a handsome, talented, articulate alcoholic. The writing team of producer Charles Brackett and director Billy Wilder pull no punches in their depiction of Birnam's massive weekend bender, a tailspin that finds him reeling from his favorite watering hole to Bellevue Hospital. Location shooting in New York helps the street-level atmosphere, especially a sequence in which Birnam, a budding writer, tries to hock his typewriter for booze money. He desperately staggers past shuttered storefronts--it's Yom Kippur, and the pawnshops are closed. Milland, previously known as a lightweight leading man (he'd starred in Wilder's hilarious The Major and the Minor three years earlier), burrows convincingly under the skin of the character, whether waxing poetic about the escape of drinking or screaming his lungs out in the D.T.'s sequence. Wilder, having just made the ultra-noir Double Indemnity, brought a new kind of frankness and darkness to Hollywood's treatment of a social problem. At first the film may have seemed too bold; Paramount Pictures nearly killed the release of the picture after it tested poorly with preview audiences. But once in release, The Lost Weekend became a substantial hit, and won four Oscars: for picture, director, screenplay, and actor. --Robert Horton

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