"Actor: Hattie Hayridge"

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  • Red Dwarf: Just The Shows (Vol. 1) [1988]Red Dwarf: Just The Shows (Vol. 1) | DVD | (18/10/2004) from £6.39   |  Saving you £29.86 (582.07%)   |  RRP £34.99

    Notoriously, and entirely appropriately, the original outline for Doug Naylor and Rob Grant's comedy sci-fi series Red Dwarf was sketched on the back of a beer mat. When it finally appeared on our television screens in 1988 the show had clearly stayed true to its roots, mixing jokes about excessive curry consumption with affectionate parodies of classic SF. Indeed, one of the show's most endearing and enduring features is its obvious respect for the conventions of SF, even as it gleefully subverts them. The scenario owes something to Douglas Adams's satirical Hitch-Hiker's Guide, something to The Odd Couple and a lot more to the slacker SF of John Carpenter's Dark Star. Behind the crew's constant bickering there lurks an impending sense that life, the universe and everything are all someone's idea of a terrible joke. Later series broadened the show's horizons until at last its premise was so diluted as to be unrecognisable, but in the earlier episodes contained in this box set the comedy is witty and intimate, focusing on characters and not special effects. Slob Dave Lister (Craig Charles) is the last human alive after a radiation leak wipes out the crew of the vast mining vessel Red Dwarf (episode 1, "The End"). He bums around the spaceship with the perpetually uptight and annoyed hologram of his dead bunkmate, Arnold Rimmer (Chris Barrie, the show's greatest comedy asset) and a creature evolved from a cat (dapper Danny John Jules). They are guided rather haphazardly by Holly, the worryingly thick ship's computer (lugubrious Norman Lovett). --Mark Walker

  • Red Dwarf: Series 3Red Dwarf: Series 3 | DVD | (03/11/2003) from £8.12   |  Saving you £14.86 (289.67%)   |  RRP £19.99

    The third series of Red Dwarf introduced some radical changes--all of them for the better--but the scripts remained as sharp and character-focussed as ever, making this a firm candidate for the show's best year. Gone were the dull metallic grey sets and costumes, gone too was Norman Lovett's lugubrious Holly, replaced now by comedienne Hattie Hayridge, who had previously played Hilly in the Series 2 episode "Parallel Universe". New this year were custom-made costumes, more elaborate sets, the zippy pea-green Starbug, bigger special effects and the wholly admirable Robert Llewellyn as Kryten. The benefits of the show's changes are apparent from the outset, with the mind-bending hilarity of "Backwards", in which Kryten and Rimmer establish themselves as a forwards-talking double-act on a reverse Earth. After a modest two-hander that sees Rimmer and Lister "Marooned", comes one of the Dwarf's most beloved episodes, "Polymorph". Here is the ensemble working at its best, as each character unwittingly has their strongest emotion sucked out of them. Lister loses his fear; Cat his vanity; Kryten his reserve; and Rimmer his anger ("Chameleonic Life-Forms. No Thanks"). "Body Swap" sees Lister and Rimmer involved in a bizarre attempt to prevent the ship from self-destructing. "Timeslides" delves deep into Rimmer's psyche as the boys journey haphazardly through history. Finally, "The Last Day" shows how completely Kryten has been adopted as a crewmember, when his replacement Hudzen unexpectedly shows up. On the DVD: Red Dwarf, Series 3 two-disc set maintains the high standard of presentation and wealth of extra material established by its predecessors. Among other delights there are the usual "Smeg Ups" and deleted scenes, plus another fun commentary with the cast. There's a lengthy documentary, "All Change", specifically about Series 3, a tribute to costume designer Mel Bibby, Hattie Hayridge's convention video diary, and--most fascinating--the opportunity to watch "Backwards" played forwards, so you can finally understand what Arthur Smith's backwards-talking pub manager actually says to Rimmer and Kryten in the dressing room. --Mark Walker

  • Red Dwarf: Series 4Red Dwarf: Series 4 | DVD | (16/02/2004) from £6.54   |  Saving you £13.45 (67.30%)   |  RRP £19.99

    By the end of this fourth year, Red Dwarf had completed its metamorphosis from a modest studio-bound sitcom with a futuristic premise to a full-blown science-fiction series, complete with a relatively lavish (by BBC standards) special-effects budget, more impressive sets and more location shooting. Despite the heavier emphasis on SF, the character-based comedy remained as sharp as ever. Witness the Cat's reaction to Lister's pus-filled exploding head; Kryten's devastatingly sarcastic defence of Rimmer; or, the classic scene that opens the series, Lister teaching Kryten to lie. In "Camille", Robert Llewellyn's real-life wife plays a female mechanoid who transforms into something else entirely, as does the episode, which by the end becomes a delightful skit on Casablanca. "DNA" comes over all SF, with lots of techno-speak about a matter transmogrifier and a RoboCop homage--but in typical Dwarf fashion, turns out to be all about curry. "Justice" sees Rimmer on trial for the murder of the entire crew, while Lister attempts to evade a psychotic cyborg. Holly gets her IQ back in "White Hole", but wastes time debating bread products with the toaster. "Dimension Jump" introduces dashing doppelganger Ace Rimmer for the first time--he was to return in later series, with diminishingly funny results. Here his appearance is all the better for its apparent improbability. Finally, "Meltdown" goes on location (to a park in North London) where waxdroids of historical characters (played by a miscellaneous selection of cheesy lookalikes) are at war. Only intermittently successful, this episode is really memorable for Chris Barrie's tour-de-force performance, as Rimmer becomes a crazed, Patton-esque general. On the DVD: Red Dwarf, Series 4, like its predecessors, comes as a two-disc set complete with full cast commentary for every episode, an extensive retrospective documentary (mostly featuring the cast reminiscing), deleted scenes and lots of other fun bits of trivia. --Mark Walker

  • Red Dwarf: Series 5Red Dwarf: Series 5 | DVD | (08/11/2004) from £8.57   |  Saving you £11.42 (57.10%)   |  RRP £19.99

    It's brown alert time all over again for Red Dwarf fans with the fifth season of the much-loved sci-fi/comedy series. Episode-wise, it's business as usual for the crew of the Red Dwarf--that is, if one considers encountering an alien squid that squirts a despair-inducing hallucinogen ("Back to Reality", later voted the best episode of the series by viewers and Stephen Hawking!), evil (and not particularly bright) versions of the crew ("Demons and Angels"), a virus that causes insanity ("Quarantine"), and a trip to a moon created entirely from the mind of the insufferable hologram Rimmer ("Terrorform") business as usual. In short, it's six hilarious episodes, highlighted by the typically terrific writing of creators Rob Grant and Doug Naylor (who also direct two episodes). As with the previous deluxe DVD releases, Series V features a wealth of supplemental features, the most intriguing of which is a look at the failed attempt to recreate the show in America (with U.K. cast member Robert Llewellyn and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's Terry Farrell as Cat). Also included are cast and fan commentaries, featurettes on the show's "science" and villains, special effects tests, blooper reels, and a sampling of Grant and Naylor's BBC 4 radio sketch "Dave Hollins, Space Cadet", which served as the inspiration for Red Dwarf. Dedicated DVD owners will also be rewarded by Easter eggs lurking throughout the menus. --Paul Gaita

  • Red Dwarf - Series 5 BD [Blu-ray] [2016]Red Dwarf - Series 5 BD | Blu Ray | (26/02/2018) from £23.49   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    The entire fifth season of the popular BBC sci-fi comedy set on board the mining spaceship Red Dwarf. In 'Holoship', Rimmer (Chris Barrie) falls in love with Commander Nirvanah Crane (Jane Horrocks), captain of a computer-generated spaceship. In 'The Inquisitor', Lister (Craig Charles)'s body is taken over by a self-repairing stimulant, known as The Inquisitor, who flies back and forth through time judging the quality of people's lives - and obliterating them if they do not meet his exacting requirements. In 'Terrorform', the crew cross the Swamp of Despair to look for Rimmer who has been captured on a 'psy-moon': a moon that shapes itself to a person's psyche. In 'Quarantine', the crew contract a Luck Virus and a Sexual Magnetism Virus from a hologram in an abandoned research centre. 'Demons and Angels' sees Lister and Kryten (Robert Llewellyn) playing with their new invention, a triplicator - but unfortunately the machine is having more than a few teething problems. Finally, in 'Back to Reality', the gang 'wake up' to find they have been playing a computer game called Red Dwarf for the last four years, and they are actually a bunch of sad geeks... apart from Lister, who is really a rich and successful yuppie called Sebastian.

  • Red Dwarf - Series 4 BD [Blu-ray] [2016]Red Dwarf - Series 4 BD | Blu Ray | (26/02/2018) from £23.49   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    All six episodes from the fourth series of the sci-fi comedy. In 'Camille' Kryten (Robert Llewellyn) finds love, while the crew battle a DNA beast in 'DNA'. In 'Justice' Rimmer (Chris Barrie) is in deep trouble when the crew stumble across Justice World, where everyone is judged for their crimes. 'Dimension Jump' features an alternative universe where Rimmer is a hero, while in 'White Hole' Holly (Hattie Hayridge) powers down the ship leaving it drifting towards certain doom. In 'Meltdown' the crew visit Waxworld where old wax droids in the theme world have embarked on a fruitless war between different factions.

  • Red Dwarf - Series 3 BD [Blu-ray] [2016]Red Dwarf - Series 3 BD | Blu Ray | (26/02/2018) from £33.73   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    All six episodes from the third series of the popular sci-fi sitcom. In 'Backwards' the crew returns to what they think is Earth, but find time is behaving oddly, and loads of things begin to un-happen. In 'Marooned' Lister (Craig Charles) and Rimmer (Chris Barrie) find themselves stranded on an arctic moon with no food (except a pot noodle and a can of dog food), no heating and little hope of survival. The boys decide to open their hearts to each other. In 'Polymorph' a chameleonic genetic mutant gets aboard the ship and terrorises the crew with non-stop slobbering horrors. In 'Bodyswap' Rimmer and Lister swap bodies to help Dave lose weight, but Rimmer won't swap back after the experiment. In 'Timeslides' the crew travel back in time thanks to some mutated developing fluid that allows people to walk into photographs. Finally, in 'The Last Day', Kryten (Robert Llewellyn) discovers that he only has 24 hours of operating time left, so the boys decide to give him a great, last day.

  • Red Dwarf: Series 5 (Limited Edition Gift Set) [1988]Red Dwarf: Series 5 (Limited Edition Gift Set) | DVD | (08/11/2004) from £26.98   |  Saving you £-6.99 (-35.00%)   |  RRP £19.99

    The complete fifth series of interstellar comedy from the Red Dwarf crew filled with classic moments such as Rimmer finally making it into the Space Corps not to mention Mr Flibble and the first appearance of Cat's alter-ego the dreaded Dwayne Dibley... Holoship: Rimmer is transmitted from Red Dwarf to the advanced Holoship Enlightenment which contains the cream of the Space Corps. Everything he has dreamed of exists on this ship; can he earn a commission to join this fantastic vessel? The Inquisitor: The Inquisitor roams through time weeding out life's wastrels and deleting the worthless: the crew of Red Dwarf crew are in serious trouble! Terrorform Rimmer: is taken prisoner inside his own mind and ends up being stripped oiled manacled licked chained taunted humiliated and nearly has a knobbly thing the size of a Mexican agarve cactus jammed up where only customs men dare to probe... Quarantine: After an encounter at a viral research centre Rimmer forces the crew to spend twelve weeks in quarantine. But who's watching the watcher? Demons And Angels: Who knows what evil lurks within the hearts of men? The Red Dwarf crew find out when they encounter their dark sides - four evil 'doppelgangers' hell bent on their destruction! Back to Reality: The crew discover an abandoned space ship on an ocean bed. However the salvage operation suddenly doesn't sound quite so sexy when they realise all of the occupants of the vessel committed suicide. Attack by a gigantic sea monster makes escape the favourite option...

  • Red Dwarf Series 4 [DVD]Red Dwarf Series 4 | DVD | (07/03/2011) from £5.49   |  Saving you £-0.50 (-10.00%)   |  RRP £4.99

    By the end of this fourth year, Red Dwarf had completed its metamorphosis from a modest studio-bound sitcom with a futuristic premise to a full-blown science-fiction series, complete with a relatively lavish (by BBC standards) special-effects budget, more impressive sets and more location shooting. Despite the heavier emphasis on SF, the character-based comedy remained as sharp as ever. Witness the Cat's reaction to Lister's pus-filled exploding head; Kryten's devastatingly sarcastic defence of Rimmer; or, the classic scene that opens the series, Lister teaching Kryten to lie. In "Camille", Robert Llewellyn's real-life wife plays a female mechanoid who transforms into something else entirely, as does the episode, which by the end becomes a delightful skit on Casablanca. "DNA" comes over all SF, with lots of techno-speak about a matter transmogrifier and a RoboCop homage--but in typical Dwarf fashion, turns out to be all about curry. "Justice" sees Rimmer on trial for the murder of the entire crew, while Lister attempts to evade a psychotic cyborg. Holly gets her IQ back in "White Hole", but wastes time debating bread products with the toaster. "Dimension Jump" introduces dashing doppelganger Ace Rimmer for the first time--he was to return in later series, with diminishingly funny results. Here his appearance is all the better for its apparent improbability. Finally, "Meltdown" goes on location (to a park in North London) where waxdroids of historical characters (played by a miscellaneous selection of cheesy lookalikes) are at war. Only intermittently successful, this episode is really memorable for Chris Barrie's tour-de-force performance, as Rimmer becomes a crazed, Patton-esque general. On the DVD: Red Dwarf, Series 4, like its predecessors, comes as a two-disc set complete with full cast commentary for every episode, an extensive retrospective documentary (mostly featuring the cast reminiscing), deleted scenes and lots of other fun bits of trivia. --Mark Walker

  • Red Dwarf Series 3 [DVD]Red Dwarf Series 3 | DVD | (07/03/2011) from £6.73   |  Saving you £-1.74 (-34.90%)   |  RRP £4.99

    The third series of Red Dwarf introduced some radical changes--all of them for the better--but the scripts remained as sharp and character-focussed as ever, making this a firm candidate for the show's best year. Gone were the dull metallic grey sets and costumes, gone too was Norman Lovett's lugubrious Holly, replaced now by comedienne Hattie Hayridge, who had previously played Hilly in the Series 2 episode "Parallel Universe". New this year were custom-made costumes, more elaborate sets, the zippy pea-green Starbug, bigger special effects and the wholly admirable Robert Llewellyn as Kryten. The benefits of the show's changes are apparent from the outset, with the mind-bending hilarity of "Backwards", in which Kryten and Rimmer establish themselves as a forwards-talking double-act on a reverse Earth. After a modest two-hander that sees Rimmer and Lister "Marooned", comes one of the Dwarf's most beloved episodes, "Polymorph". Here is the ensemble working at its best, as each character unwittingly has their strongest emotion sucked out of them. Lister loses his fear; Cat his vanity; Kryten his reserve; and Rimmer his anger ("Chameleonic Life-Forms. No Thanks"). "Body Swap" sees Lister and Rimmer involved in a bizarre attempt to prevent the ship from self-destructing. "Timeslides" delves deep into Rimmer's psyche as the boys journey haphazardly through history. Finally, "The Last Day" shows how completely Kryten has been adopted as a crewmember, when his replacement Hudzen unexpectedly shows up. On the DVD: Red Dwarf, Series 3 two-disc set maintains the high standard of presentation and wealth of extra material established by its predecessors. Among other delights there are the usual "Smeg Ups" and deleted scenes, plus another fun commentary with the cast. There's a lengthy documentary, "All Change", specifically about Series 3, a tribute to costume designer Mel Bibby, Hattie Hayridge's convention video diary, and--most fascinating--the opportunity to watch "Backwards" played forwards, so you can finally understand what Arthur Smith's backwards-talking pub manager actually says to Rimmer and Kryten in the dressing room. --Mark Walker

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