"Actor: Michael Bates"

  • A Clockwork Orange [Blu-ray] [1971]A Clockwork Orange | Blu Ray | (03/03/2008) from £8.99   |  Saving you £16.00 (177.98%)   |  RRP £24.99

    Stomping whomping stealing singing tap-dancing violating Derby-topped teddy-boy hooligan Alex (Malcolm McDowell) has his own way of having a good time. He has it at the tragic expense of others. Alex's journey from amoral punk to brainwashed proper citizen forms the dynamic arc of Stanley Kubrick's future-shook vision of Anthony Burgess's novel. Unforgettable images startling musical counterpoints the fascinating language used by Alex and his pals - Kubrick shapes them into a shattering whole.

  • A Clockwork Orange [4K Ultra HD] [1971] [Blu-ray] [Region Free]A Clockwork Orange | Blu Ray | (04/10/2021) from £21.98   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Stomping, whomping, stealing, singing, tap dancing, violating. Derby-topped hooligan Alex (Malcolm McDowell) has a good time - at the tragic expense of others. His journey from amoral dynamic arc of Stanley Kubrick's future-shock vision of Anothony Burgess' novel. Controversial when first released, A Clockwork Orange won New York Film Critics Best Picture and Director awards and earned four Oscar nominations, including Best Picture. Its power still entices, shocks and holds us in its grasp. Special Features Commentary by Malcolm McDowell and Historian Nick Redman Channel Four Documentary Still Tickin': The Return of Clockwork Orange Featurette Great Bolshy Yarblockos!: Making A Clockwork Orange Featurette Turning Like Clockwork Featurette Malcolm McDowell Looks Back Theatrical Trailer Note: Only 4K Disc is Region Free

  • A Clockwork OrangeA Clockwork Orange | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £6.19   |  Saving you £7.80 (126.01%)   |  RRP £13.99

    The controversy that surrounded Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of Anthony Burgess's dystopian novel A Clockwork Orange while the film was out of circulation suggested that it was like Romper Stomper: a glamorisation of the violent, virile lifestyle of its teenage protagonist, with a hypocritical gloss of condemnation to mask delight in rape and ultra-violence. Actually, it is as fable-like and abstract as The Pilgrim's Progress, with characters deliberately played as goonish sitcom creations. The anarchic rampage of Alex (Malcolm McDowell), a bowler-hatted juvenile delinquent of the future, is all over at the end of the first act. Apprehended by equally brutal authorities, he changes from defiant thug to cringing bootlicker, volunteering for a behaviourist experiment that removes his capacity to do evil.It's all stylised: from Burgess' invented pidgin Russian (snarled unforgettably by McDowell) to 2001-style slow tracks through sculpturally perfect sets (as with many Kubrick movies, the story could be told through decor alone) and exaggerated, grotesque performances on a par with those of Dr Strangelove (especially from Patrick Magee and Aubrey Morris). Made in 1971, based on a novel from 1962, A Clockwork Orange resonates across the years. Its future is now quaint, with Magee pecking out "subversive literature" on a giant IBM typewriter and "lovely, lovely Ludwig Van" on mini-cassette tapes. However, the world of "Municipal Flat Block 18A, Linear North" is very much with us: a housing estate where classical murals are obscenely vandalised, passers-by are rare and yobs loll about with nothing better to do than hurt people. On the DVD: The extras are skimpy, with just an impressionist trailer in the style of the film used to brainwash Alex and a list of awards for which Clockwork Orange was nominated and awarded. The box promises soundtracks in English, French and Italian and subtitles in ten languages, but the disc just has two English soundtracks (mono and Dolby Surround 5.1) and two sets of English subtitles. The terrific-looking "digitally restored and remastered" print is letterboxed at 1.66:1 and on a widescreen TV plays best at 14:9. The film looks as good as it ever has, with rich stable colours (especially and appropriately the orangey-red of the credits and the blood) and a clarity that highlights previously unnoticed details such as Alex's gouged eyeball cufflinks and enables you to read the newspaper articles which flash by. The 5.1 soundtrack option is amazingly rich, benefiting the nuances of performance as much as the classical/electronic music score and the subtly unsettling sound effects. --Kim Newman

  • Last Of The Summer Wine: Series 1-10 [DVD]Last Of The Summer Wine: Series 1-10 | DVD | (20/11/2017) from £31.71   |  Saving you £13.77 (43.42%)   |  RRP £45.48

    Welcome to Holmfirth, a breathtakingly beautiful village in the heart of the Holme Valley, home to our favourite idiosyncratic retired gentlemen. As they amble about the countryside, these unlikely lads are now enjoying a mischievous second childhood, devising and executing a multitude of (grey) hare-brained schemes. Which is just what you'd expect from Britain's oldest, if not wisest adolescents, and their equally eccentric fellow townspeople. Helped by a supporting band of formidable wives, hen-pecked husbands, sexually-charged mistresses, inventors, pigeon fanciers and balding lotharios, our three heroes are never far from one adventure or another. It'll end in trouble especially when the formidable Nora Batty finds out. Collecting the first ten series of one of the BBC's most popular and enduring comedies, the Early Years box set features 75 episodes, including memorable classics such as Forked Lightning where Clegg (Peter Sallis) has several extremely embarrassing accidents on his bicycle and And Who's That Dancing With Nora Batty Then? Where Compo (Bill Owen) finally gets to dance with Nora Batty, which ends after he steps on her foot.

  • American Horror Story - Freak Show [Blu-ray] [2015]American Horror Story - Freak Show | Blu Ray | (26/10/2015) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £34.99

    AMERICAN HORROR STORY: FREAK SHOW begins its tale in the quiet sleepy hamlet of Jupiter Florida. The year is 1952. A troupe of curiosities has just arrived to town coinciding with the strange emergence of a dark entity that savagely threatens the lives of townsfolk and freaks alike. This is the story of the performers and their desperate journey of survival amidst the dying world of the American carny experience

  • Bedazzled [1967]Bedazzled | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £25.63   |  Saving you £-4.64 (N/A%)   |  RRP £20.99

    The original comedy classic available for the first time in over ten years. Dudley Moore is the amiable but timid Wimpy Bar cook Stanley who agrees to sell his soul if he can't 'make it' with the girl of his dreams waitress Eleanor Bron. Peter Cook (as Satan) provides him with seven wishes in exchange for his soul and luscious Raquel Welch (as Lust) is on hand to offer temptation... Moore is charming enough and some sly commentary on Christian morality is interesting however wh

  • Last Of The Summer Wine - Series 5 And 6 - CompleteLast Of The Summer Wine - Series 5 And 6 - Complete | DVD | (05/03/2007) from £14.83   |  Saving you £-4.83 (N/A%)   |  RRP £10.00

    The trio find themselves in more scrapes and adventures in this the fifth and sixth series of the long running BBC sit-com Last Of The Summer Wine. Series 5 - Episode Listing: 1. Full Steam Behind 2. The Flag And It's Snags 3. The Flag And Further Snags 4. Deep In The Heart Of Yorkshire 5. Earnshaw Strikes Back 6. Here We Go Into The Wild Blue Yonder 7. Here We Go Again Into The Wild Blue Yonder 8. And A Dewhurst Up A Fir Tree 9. Whoops Series 6 - Episode Listing: 1. In The Service Of Humanity 2. Car And Garter 3. The Odd Dog Men 4. A Bicycle Made For Three 5. One Of The Last Few Places Unexplored By Man 6. Serenade For Tight Jeans And Metal Detector 7. From Wellies To Wet Suit 8. All Mod Conned

  • Frenzy [1972]Frenzy | DVD | (17/10/2005) from £5.38   |  Saving you £4.61 (85.69%)   |  RRP £9.99

    By the time Alfred Hitchcock's second-to-last picture came out in 1972, the censorship restrictions under which he had laboured during his long career had eased up. Now he could give full sway to his lurid fantasies, and that may explain why Frenzy is the director's most violent movie by far--outstripping even Psycho for sheer brutality. Adapted by playwright Anthony Shaffer, the story concerns a series of rape-murders committed by suave fruit-merchant Bob Rusk (Barry Foster), who gets his kicks from throttling women with a necktie. This being a Hitchcock thriller, suspicion naturally falls on the wrong man--ill-tempered publican Richard Blaney (Jon Finch). Enter Inspector Oxford from New Scotland Yard (Alex McCowan), who thrashes out the finer points of the case with his wife (Vivian Merchant), whose tireless enthusiasm for indigestible delicacies like quail with grapes supplies a classic running gag.Frenzy was the first film Hitchcock had shot entirely in his native Britain since Jamaica Inn (1939), and many contemporary critics used that fact to account for what seemed to them a glorious return to form after a string of Hollywood duds (Marnie, Torn Curtain, Topaz). Hitchcock specialists are often less wild about it, judging the detective plot mechanical and the oh-so-English tone insufferable. But at least three sequences rank among the most skin-crawling the maestro ever put on celluloid. There is an astonishing moment when the camera backs away from a room in which a murder is occurring, down the stairs, through the front door and then across the street to join the crowd milling indifferently on the pavement. There is also the killer's nerve-wracking attempt to retrieve his tiepin from a corpse stuffed into a sack of potatoes. Finally, there is one act of strangulation so prolonged and gruesome it verges on the pornographic. Was the veteran film-maker a rampant misogynist as feminist observers have frequently charged? Sit through this appalling scene if you dare and decide for yourself. --Peter Matthews

  • Last Of The Summer Wine - Series 1 And 2 [1973]Last Of The Summer Wine - Series 1 And 2 | DVD | (02/09/2002) from £12.48   |  Saving you £-2.17 (N/A%)   |  RRP £8.32

    First transmitted in 1973 this release features every episode from Series One and Two of 'Last Of The Summer Wine'. Episode titles: Short Back And Palais Glide Inventor Of The 40-Foot Ferret Pate And Chips Spring Fever The New Mobile Trio Hail Smiling Morn Or Thereabouts Forked Lightning Who's That Dancing With Nora Batty Then? The Changing Face Of Rural Blamire Some Enchanted Evening A Quiet Drink Ballad For Wind Instruments And Canoe Northern Flying Circus.

  • Jennifer 8 [1992]Jennifer 8 | DVD | (18/03/2002) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Written and directed by Bruce Robinson (Withnail and I), this fast-moving potboiler finds its creator getting about as far from Withnail's fine wines and London and Lake District settings as it's possible to get, and into the world of bloody homicides, narrative red herrings and emotionally damaged policemen. John Berlin (Andy Garcia) is a big-city cop and, yes, that means he drinks a lot of coffee and has a terrible personal life (in this case, signified by a wife who just can't stop cheating on him). Leaving town to visit his understanding brother-in law and fellow detective Freddy Ross (Lance Henriksen), he promptly finds himself embroiled in the hunt for a serial killer with a grisly modus operandi for murdering blind women. As you might expect, it's not long before he's bumbling his way into a number of confrontations with the hick cops around him and an affair with Helena (Uma Thurman), the blind room-mate of one of the killer's victims. Slick and pacey, Jennifer 8 throws out so many plot that it eventually winds up falling over them in its haste to get to the overblown climax. Nothing here makes a great deal of sense and yet, despite its inherent cosmic silliness, Robinson handles the suspense-and-relief routine with a flashy aplomb, and the cast do well in the face of the material's shortcomings. (John Malkovich's brief appearance is a redemptive highlight, even if you do have to wait almost 90 minutes for it). --Danny Leigh

  • American Horror Story - Freak Show [DVD] [2015]American Horror Story - Freak Show | DVD | (26/10/2015) from £10.69   |  Saving you £19.30 (180.54%)   |  RRP £29.99

    AMERICAN HORROR STORY: FREAK SHOW begins its tale in the quiet sleepy hamlet of Jupiter Florida. The year is 1952. A troupe of curiosities has just arrived to town coinciding with the strange emergence of a dark entity that savagely threatens the lives of townsfolk and freaks alike. This is the story of the performers and their desperate journey of survival amidst the dying world of the American carny experience.

  • Mosquito Squadron [1968]Mosquito Squadron | DVD | (05/05/2003) from £9.43   |  Saving you £3.56 (37.75%)   |  RRP £12.99

    World War II aviation buffs may quibble with the details of Mosquito Squadron, but they'll love it just the same. It's an average war movie, capably directed by Boris Sagal, who thrived in television before he was tragically killed by a helicopter rotor in 1981. At the peak of his post-Man from UNCLE success, David McCallum plays a melancholy RAF ace, leading his squadron of De Havilland "Mosquito" bombers on low-altitude strikes over Nazi strongholds in Germany and France. His ground-based dilemma involves the grieving wife of his best friend, a fellow pilot presumed dead but later discovered alive with other POWs held at a French chalet where the Nazis are developing advanced V-class bombers. The RAF employs bouncing "highballs" capable of penetrating difficult targets, and the rousing climax doubles as a rescue mission and treacherous bombing run. Explosive action compensates for predictable melodrama, and Rocky Horror fans will enjoy seeing Charles ("the Criminologist") Gray as a stuffy RAF Commodore. --Jeff Shannon

  • Xanadu [1980]Xanadu | DVD | (28/06/2004) from £8.98   |  Saving you £4.00 (66.78%)   |  RRP £9.99

    A wimpy remake of an already anaemic movie (the 1947 Rita Hayworth vehicle Down to Earth), this glitzy musical from 1980 improbably stars Olivia Newton-John as a heavenly muse sent here to help open a roller-derby disco. Gene Kelly is mixed up in this well-meaning but goofy effort to fuse nostalgia with late-70s glitter-ball trendiness, and he looks just plain silly. Directed by Robert Greenwald, the film doesn't even work as decent kitsch. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • Last Of The Summer Wine: Series 1-4 [DVD]Last Of The Summer Wine: Series 1-4 | DVD | (18/01/2016) from £7.99   |  Saving you £7.01 (87.73%)   |  RRP £15.00

    All 28 episodes from the first four series of Roy Clarke's long-running BBC sitcom set in the Yorkshire Dales. Series 1 episodes are: 'Short Back and Palais Glide', 'Inventor of the 40-Foot Ferret', 'Paté and Chips', 'Spring Fever', 'The New Mobile Trio' and 'Hail Smiling Morn Or Thereabouts'. Series 2 episodes are: 'Forked Lightning', 'Who's That Dancing With Nora Batty Then?', 'The Changing Face of Rural Blamire', 'Some Enchanted Evening', 'A Quiet Drink', 'Ballad for Wind Instruments and Canoe' and 'Northern Flying Circus'. Series 3 episodes are: 'The Man from Oswestry', 'Mending Stuart's Leg', 'The Great Boarding House Bathroom Caper', 'Cheering Up Gordon', 'The Kink in Foggy's Niblick', 'Going to Gordon's Wedding' and 'Isometrics and After'. Series 4 episodes are: 'Ferret Come Home', 'Getting On With Sidney's Wire', 'Jubilee', 'Flower Power Cut', 'Who Made a Bit of a Splash in Wales Then?', 'Greenfingers', 'A Merry Heatwave' and 'The Bandit from Stoke-On-Trent'.

  • The Escapist [2002]The Escapist | DVD | (16/02/2004) from £6.73   |  Saving you £3.26 (32.60%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Denis (Jonny Lee Miller) is a man whose life is shattered by a single criminal act in which his young wife is killed in a bungled break-in by a psychotic career criminal Ricky Barnes (Serkis). Denis for whom life up to then had seemed perfect cannot cope with his loss and dedicates his life to tracking down the man responsible. It is a pursuit which requires him not only to be sent to jail but to be sent to the worst prison in Britain...

  • The Knack And How To Get It [1965]The Knack And How To Get It | DVD | (02/08/2004) from £9.43   |  Saving you £6.56 (41.00%)   |  RRP £15.99

    Cool and sophisticated Tolen has a monopoly on womanising - with a long line of conquests to prove it - while the naive and awkward Colin desperately wants a piece of it. But when Colin falls for an innocent country girl it's not long before the self assured Tolen moves in for the kill. Is all fair in love and war or can Colin get the knack and beat Tolen at his own game?

  • The Good Life - Series 3 [1977]The Good Life - Series 3 | DVD | (12/07/2004) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £24.99

    The third series of the self-reliance sitcom. Episodes comprise: 1. The Early Birds 2. The Happy Event 3. A Tug Of The Forelock 4. I Talk To The Trees 5. Whos Fleas Are These? 6. The Last Posh Frock

  • The Statement [2004]The Statement | DVD | (26/07/2004) from £6.73   |  Saving you £6.26 (93.02%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Michael Caine stars as a Frenchman who finds himself being pursued by hit men and the police when an investigation reveals his history as a war criminal.

  • Stanley Kubrick [1962]Stanley Kubrick | DVD | (10/09/2001) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £99.99

    This superb nine-disc Stanley Kubrick Box Set contains all the late director's work from 1962's Lolita to Kubrick's final film, the highly controversial Eyes Wide Shut (1999). There's also the excellent and highly informative two-hour documentary: Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures, narrated (a little drably) by Tom Cruise. It isn't exactly a warts-and-all portrait of Stan the Man, which is not surprising, really, given that it's directed and produced by Kubrick's brother-in-law Jan Harlan, and that Kubrick's widow Christine was closely involved in the making of it. But it does give a detailed and revealing portrait of a brilliant, demanding and often infuriating man, airing rare footage that goes right back to his earliest years as a brash youngster in the Bronx, already playing to camera with a frightening degree of self-awareness. Six of the eight movies (all but Dr Strangelove and Eyes Wide Shut) have been digitally restored and remastered, and almost all (barring Strangelove again and Lolita) now boast Dolby Digital 5.1 stereo sound remixes. For some bizarre reason, Kubrick insisted on mono sound for the 1999 set, which he approved shortly before his death. Visually the improvement over the often grainy, scratchy prints previously on offer--The Shining (1980) was notoriously messy--is immense. All the features are presented in their original ratios, which in the case of Strangelove means the changing ratios in which it was originally shot, and for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) the full glorious 2.21:1 expanse of the Cinerama screen.So what don't you get? Essentially, the early Kubrick--the work of the young, hungry director before he moved to England and started to gather all the controlling strings into his own hand: most notably the tough, taut thriller The Killing (1956) and the icily furious war film Paths of Glory (1957). Too bad Warners couldn't have negotiated the rights for those too. But what we have here is the culminating phase of Kubrick's filmmaking career--the final 27 years of one of the great masters of cinema. On the DVDs: Besides the visual and sonic improvements mentioned above, each of the eight features includes the original theatrical trailer and multiple-language subtitles. The DVD of Dr Strangelove also gives us filmographies of the principal players, plus theatrical posters and a photo gallery, while Eyes Wide Shut includes interviews (taped after Kubrick's death) with Tom Cruise, Nicole Kidman and Steven Spielberg, plus a couple of 30-second TV spots. And with The Shining we get a fascinating 34-minute documentary made by Kubrick's then 17-year-old daughter Vivian, plus--just to add a further layer--Vivian's present-day voice-over commentary on her film. --Philip Kemp

  • Clockwork Orange [1972]Clockwork Orange | DVD | (13/11/2000) from £5.49   |  Saving you £14.50 (72.50%)   |  RRP £19.99

    The controversy that surrounded Stanley Kubrick's adaptation of Anthony Burgess's dystopian novel A Clockwork Orange while the film was out of circulation suggested that it was like Romper Stomper: a glamorisation of the violent, virile lifestyle of its teenage protagonist, with a hypocritical gloss of condemnation to mask delight in rape and ultra-violence. Actually, it is as fable-like and abstract as The Pilgrim's Progress, with characters deliberately played as goonish sitcom creations. The anarchic rampage of Alex (Malcolm McDowell), a bowler-hatted juvenile delinquent of the future, is all over at the end of the first act. Apprehended by equally brutal authorities, he changes from defiant thug to cringing bootlicker, volunteering for a behaviourist experiment that removes his capacity to do evil.It's all stylised: from Burgess' invented pidgin Russian (snarled unforgettably by McDowell) to 2001-style slow tracks through sculpturally perfect sets (as with many Kubrick movies, the story could be told through decor alone) and exaggerated, grotesque performances on a par with those of Dr Strangelove (especially from Patrick Magee and Aubrey Morris). Made in 1971, based on a novel from 1962, A Clockwork Orange resonates across the years. Its future is now quaint, with Magee pecking out "subversive literature" on a giant IBM typewriter and "lovely, lovely Ludwig Van" on mini-cassette tapes. However, the world of "Municipal Flat Block 18A, Linear North" is very much with us: a housing estate where classical murals are obscenely vandalised, passers-by are rare and yobs loll about with nothing better to do than hurt people. On the DVD: The extras are skimpy, with just an impressionist trailer in the style of the film used to brainwash Alex and a list of awards for which Clockwork Orange was nominated and awarded. The box promises soundtracks in English, French and Italian and subtitles in ten languages, but the disc just has two English soundtracks (mono and Dolby Surround 5.1) and two sets of English subtitles. The terrific-looking "digitally restored and remastered" print is letterboxed at 1.66:1 and on a widescreen TV plays best at 14:9. The film looks as good as it ever has, with rich stable colours (especially and appropriately the orangey-red of the credits and the blood) and a clarity that highlights previously unnoticed details such as Alex's gouged eyeball cufflinks and enables you to read the newspaper articles which flash by. The 5.1 soundtrack option is amazingly rich, benefiting the nuances of performance as much as the classical/electronic music score and the subtly unsettling sound effects. --Kim Newman

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