"Actor: Nanette Newman"

  • Restless Natives [1985]Restless Natives | DVD | (18/04/2005) from £16.18   |  Saving you £-0.19 (N/A%)   |  RRP £15.99

    They're bigger than the Loch Ness monster! Ronnie and Will two lads from Edinburgh embark on a non-violent spree of robberies. Dressing up in bizarre costumes the duo act as modern highwaymen robbing coach loads of tourists in the Highlands; eventually earning them the tag the Clown and the Wolfman. In the process they become folk heroes to the locals. Their adventures make for a whimsical and gentle comedy in the Bill Forsyth vein.

  • The Stepford Wives [1975]The Stepford Wives | DVD | (09/08/2004) from £6.73   |  Saving you £6.26 (93.02%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Ira Levin's scary novel about forced conformity in a small Connecticut town made the Stepford Wives a compelling 1975 thriller. Katharine Ross stars as a city woman who moves with her husband to Stepford and is startled by how perpetually happy many of the local women seem to be. Her search for an answer reveals a plot to replace troublesome real wives with more accommodating fake ones (not unlike the alien takeover in The Invasion of the Body Snatchers). The closer she gets to the truth, the more danger she faces--not to mention the likelihood that the men in town intend to replace her as well. Screenwriter William Goldman (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid) and director Bryan Forbes (King Rat) made this a taut, tense semi-classic with a healthy dose of satiric wit. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • The Raging Moon (Digitally Restored) [DVD] [1971]The Raging Moon (Digitally Restored) | DVD | (23/11/2015) from £9.99   |  Saving you £8.00 (80.08%)   |  RRP £17.99

    Bruce (Malcolm McDowell, If, A Clockwork Orange) is a lively young man with an irrepressible sense of fun and a sharp eye for a pretty girl. Returning home slightly the worse for wear after a wedding, he suddenly collapses. When he wakes the next day he finds himself in hospital unable to walk and the Doctors cannot diagnose his condition. When his family is unable to house him, Bruce is forced to move to a convalescence home. Here he becomes bitter about his situation and resents the intrusion of the other inmates upon his melancholy state. After a while Bruce strikes up a friendship with fellow inmate Jill (Nanette Newman) and under her influence, he begins to enjoy life again. Falling deeply in love, Bruce and Jill decide to get married against the wishes of the home's owners. Faced with the prospect of having to move out of the home and seek work, will Bruce's and Jill's love survive? Sensitively directed by Bryan Forbes (Whistle Down the Wind, The Stepford Wives), THE RAGING MOON is a tender love story featuring strong performances from Newman and McDowell

  • The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) [DVD] [1962]The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) | DVD | (27/11/2017) from £9.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    The L-Shaped Room, adapted by writer-director Bryan Forbes from Lynne Reid Banks' novel, unfolds in a dank, depressing London boarding house. Leslie Caron plays Jane Fosset, a 27-year-old French woman, down on her luck, who takes a room. There are bugs in her mattress. The taps drip. The landlady ("the lovely Doris") is a drunken, malicious busybody. Forbes doesn't paint the English in a flattering light. They're covetous, eccentric and xenophobic. "I never close my door to the nigs," Doris tells Fosset, as if to prove that she is no racist. When Fosset reveals that she's pregnant and unmarried, everybody turns against her. The one real friend Fosset makes is Toby (Tom Bell), an impoverished would-be writer who lives in the room downstairs. She starts an affair with him, but for all his protestations to the contrary, he too turns out to be moralistic and conservative--he can't accept the idea that she is having another man's baby.Forbes' dialogue sometimes grates, the film risks running into a dead end (Fosset is stuck with nowhere to go and no prospects), but this is compelling fare all the same. Cameraman Douglas Slocombe (who went on to shoot Raiders of the Lost Ark) makes the boarding house seem as gloomy and oppressive as a Gothic mansion. Forbes doesn't sentimentalise at all. The London he portrays is nothing like the swinging, hedonistic city shown in later British movies of the 60s. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) [Blu-ray] [1962]The L-Shaped Room (Digitally Restored) | Blu Ray | (27/11/2017) from £13.18   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    The L-Shaped Room, adapted by writer-director Bryan Forbes from Lynne Reid Banks' novel, unfolds in a dank, depressing London boarding house. Leslie Caron plays Jane Fosset, a 27-year-old French woman, down on her luck, who takes a room. There are bugs in her mattress. The taps drip. The landlady ("the lovely Doris") is a drunken, malicious busybody. Forbes doesn't paint the English in a flattering light. They're covetous, eccentric and xenophobic. "I never close my door to the nigs," Doris tells Fosset, as if to prove that she is no racist. When Fosset reveals that she's pregnant and unmarried, everybody turns against her. The one real friend Fosset makes is Toby (Tom Bell), an impoverished would-be writer who lives in the room downstairs. She starts an affair with him, but for all his protestations to the contrary, he too turns out to be moralistic and conservative--he can't accept the idea that she is having another man's baby.Forbes' dialogue sometimes grates, the film risks running into a dead end (Fosset is stuck with nowhere to go and no prospects), but this is compelling fare all the same. Cameraman Douglas Slocombe (who went on to shoot Raiders of the Lost Ark) makes the boarding house seem as gloomy and oppressive as a Gothic mansion. Forbes doesn't sentimentalise at all. The London he portrays is nothing like the swinging, hedonistic city shown in later British movies of the 60s. --Geoffrey Macnab

  • Raging Moon [1970]Raging Moon | DVD | (04/06/2007) from £11.99   |  Saving you £1.00 (7.70%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Bruce Pritchard is paralysed in a soccer game and is confined to a wheelchair in a convalescence home.

  • The Wrong Arm Of The Law [1962]The Wrong Arm Of The Law | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £10.78   |  Saving you £-0.79 (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Peter Sellers stars as gang-leader Pearly Gates who has a double life as Monsieur Jules the manager of a fashion house. The criminal world of London is being reduced to chaos by an Australian 'IPO mob' who acting on information provided by Gates' girlfriend Valerie (Nanette Newman) impersonate police officers and take the spoils of the true criminals after the crime has been safely committed. The crimes are relatively victimless involving jewellery thefts from the rich or robbe

  • Seance On A Wet Afternoon [1964]Seance On A Wet Afternoon | DVD | (05/06/2006) from £17.53   |  Saving you £-4.54 (N/A%)   |  RRP £12.99

    A woman who masquerades as a medium has her husband kidnap a girl so that she can gain celebrity by holding seances and helping the police to 'find' the victim...

  • Man at the Top [DVD]Man at the Top | DVD | (22/04/2013) from £6.89   |  Saving you £3.10 (44.99%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Kenneth Haigh, Nanette Newman and Harry Andrews give compelling performances in this hard-hitting 1973 film tracing the progress of Joe Lampton, the aggressively ambitious protagonist of John Braine's Room at the Top. Offering a grittier treatment than the 1959 film adaptation and the subsequent television series which sequelised Braine's classic novel, Man at the Top is featured here in a brand-new transfer from original film elements in its as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio. Northerner ...

  • Man at the Top: The Complete Series [DVD]Man at the Top: The Complete Series | DVD | (12/02/2018) from £38.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    An intense, compelling series from the early '70s, Man at the Top stars Kenneth Haigh in the continuing story of Joe Lampton, the aggressively ambitious anti-hero of John Braine's bestselling novel Room at the Top. Haigh won a BAFTA nomination for his portrayal of Lampton, and a strong supporting cast includes Zena Walker, Paul Eddington, George Sewell and Colin Welland. This set contains both series and the hit film sequel from Hammer Films. Thirteen years on from his marriage to the pregnant Susan, Joe is now a father of two with a stockbroker-belt home and a career in management consultancy. As tenacious and pushy as ever, his attentions rarely remain fixed; with plenty of candidates eagerly forming the 'other woman' queue, Joe will seize any opportunity, be it personal or professional, to further his climb to the top in the world of big business and beyond...

  • A Painted Smile/Rag Doll [DVD] [1961]A Painted Smile/Rag Doll | DVD | (19/05/2009) from £17.53   |  Saving you £-4.54 (N/A%)   |  RRP £12.99

    A Painted Smile / Rag Doll

  • The Wrong Box - Limited Edition [Blu-ray]The Wrong Box - Limited Edition | Blu Ray | (26/11/2018) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Two warring elderly brothers and their respective heirs are determined that each will outlive the other in an attempt to hold onto the family fortune and will stop at nothing even murder to achieve their goal. Bryan Forbes' riotous black comedy, based on the 1889 novel by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, stars some of the greatest talents of the day, including Peter Sellers, Michael Caine, Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, Tony Hancock, Ralph Richardson, Nanette Newman and John Mills. Extras: INDICATOR LIMITED EDITION BLU-RAY SPECIAL FEATURES: High Definition remaster Original mono audio The British Entertainment History Project Interview with Bryan Forbes (1994): archival audio recording of the celebrated filmmaker in conversation with Roy Fowler New and exclusive audio commentary with film historians Josephine Botting and Vic Pratt Interview with Nanette Newman (2018): the award-winning actor talks about The Wrong Box and her work with husband Bryan Forbes Original theatrical trailer Image gallery: promotional photography and publicity material New and improved English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing Limited edition exclusive booklet with a new essay by Vic Pratt, an overview of contemporary critical responses and historic articles on the film World premiere on Blu-ray LIMITED EDITION OF 3,000 copies

  • Tony Hancock: The Rebel / The Punch And Judy Man [1960]Tony Hancock: The Rebel / The Punch And Judy Man | DVD | (14/04/2003) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £15.99

    The Rebel (1961) and The Punch and Judy Man (1963) are the only two feature films made expressly as star vehicles for the great television comic Tony Hancock. The Rebel is by far the more ambitious, being in colour with Parisian locations, a large cast, and not least a supporting role for international star George Sanders. The opening rebellion against office life surely inspired The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin, while references follow to Look Back in Anger (1958) and Billy Wilder's The Apartment (1960) and Some Like It Hot (1959). Hancock goes to Paris to follow his artistic muse and as he rises through the art world his naivety is taken for genius, allowing for some very funny moments and spot-on satire, which are just as relevant today as 40 years ago. Filmed in black-and-white in Bognor Regis, The Punch and Judy Man is a more modest yet evocative portrait of life in a small coastal resort. Hancock is the titular beach entertainer who is happy to live from day to day with the affable companionship of John Le Mesurier and Hugh Lloyd. The problem is he's burdened with a socially ambitious wife, Sylvia Syms. Gentle humour comes from Hancock's frustrations as a proto-Basil Fawlty, and the film, packed with familiar British character actors, has an old-fashioned charm. It makes for an enjoyable supporting feature to The Rebel, which is undoubtedly a minor classic. On the DVD: Tony Hancock Double Feature presents both films at 4:3 ratio. The earlier film looks decidedly cropped in several scenes, though the latter survives the reformatting largely unscathed. The Rebel's colour is faded and the image grainy, while The Punch and Judy Man generally has a much stronger black and white image. Even so, there is some flickering and print damage. The music is distorted in The Rebel but the mono sound is fine during The Punch and Judy Man. There are no extras. --Gary S Dalkin

  • Man at the Top [Blu-ray]Man at the Top | Blu Ray | (02/03/2020) from £15.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Kenneth Haigh, Nanette Newman and Harry Andrews give memorable performances in this hard-hitting film which traces the progress of Joe Lampton, the aggressively ambitious protagonist of John Braine's Room at the Top. Offering a grittier treatment than both the 1959 film adaptation and the early '70s television series that followed, Man at the Top is featured here in a brand-new High Definition remaster from original film elements in its as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio. Northerner Joe Lampton becomes involved with Lord Ackerman, the powerful chairman of a pharmaceutical concern, his beautiful wife Alex and daughter Robin. But trouble starts when Joe is made Managing Director of one of Ackerman's companies and makes a shocking discovery: his predecessor committed suicide. Special Features: Fullscreen version Music suite of Roy Budd's original score Theatrical trailer Image galler

  • The Stepford Wives [1975]The Stepford Wives | DVD | (03/09/2001) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Ira Levin's scary novel about forced conformity in a small Connecticut town made the Stepford Wives a compelling 1975 thriller. Katharine Ross stars as a city woman who moves with her husband to Stepford and is startled by how perpetually happy many of the local women seem to be. Her search for an answer reveals a plot to replace troublesome real wives with more accommodating fake ones (not unlike the alien takeover in The Invasion of the Body Snatchers). The closer she gets to the truth, the more danger she faces--not to mention the likelihood that the men in town intend to replace her as well. Screenwriter William Goldman (Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid) and director Bryan Forbes (King Rat) made this a taut, tense semi-classic with a healthy dose of satiric wit. --Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • Deadfall [Blu-ray]Deadfall | Blu Ray | (05/02/2018) from £12.98   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Michael Caine stars as a cat burglar in this 1960s suspense thriller directed by Bryan Forbes. When jewel thieves Richard and Fe Moreau (Eric Portman and Giovanna Ralli) invite former alcoholic cat burglar Henry Clarke (Caine) to join their ranks for a daring robbery, things quickly become complicated. Finding himself increasingly attracted to Fe, Henry soon realises that the couple's relationship is far from what it seems, a fact that has a bearing on events when the trio decide to relieve Spanish playboy Salinas (David Buck) of his jewels. Extras: High Definition Transfer Interview with Chris Poggiali 28 Booklet by Michael Caine Expert Christopher Bray Still Gallery Theatrical Trailer

  • The League Of Gentlemen [1960]The League Of Gentlemen | DVD | (15/01/2001) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £14.99

    The League of Gentlemen is a sardonic crime drama in which Jack Hawkins plays an embittered retired army officer who recruits seven fellow ex-soldiers to carry out a bank raid with military precision. The film presents an England between post-war austerity and the more liberated 1960s where traditional moral certainties were rapidly being discarded; a London where ex-officers left on the scrapheap at war's end could justify turning their military experience to armed robbery. Unfortunately the tale is neither particularly amusing or thrilling, with an overlong central detour via an army camp prefacing the exciting heist and a largely anti-climactic ending. Nevertheless Hawkins effectively subverts his heroic officer type from The Cruel Sea (1953) and The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), and there's excellent support from a great cast including Nigel Patrick, Richard Attenborough and Roger Livesey. Bryan Forbes not only wrote the cynical screenplay but costarred with wife Nanette Newman in her first significant screen role. More influential than truly classic, The League of Gentlemen has lent its name to a modern BBC comedy, an "Extraordinary" comic strip-turned-movie, and proved the template for heist films ever since, including both versions of The Italian Job (1969 and 2003). On the DVD:The League of Gentlemen is presented in an anamorphically enhanced 16:9 transfer from an excellent condition print and mostly looks and sounds fine. There's minimal print damage, though sadly Philip Green's ironically patriotic main title music suffers from significant distortion. The only extra is the original trailer, which is now something of a period piece itself. --Gary S Dalkin

  • The Raging Moon (Digitally Restored) [Blu-ray] [1971]The Raging Moon (Digitally Restored) | Blu Ray | (23/11/2015) from £12.49   |  Saving you £10.50 (84.07%)   |  RRP £22.99

    Bruce (Malcolm McDowell, If, A Clockwork Orange) is a lively young man with an irrepressible sense of fun and a sharp eye for a pretty girl. Returning home slightly the worse for wear after a wedding, he suddenly collapses. When he wakes the next day he finds himself in hospital unable to walk and the Doctors cannot diagnose his condition. When his family is unable to house him, Bruce is forced to move to a convalescence home. Here he becomes bitter about his situation and resents the intrusion of the other inmates upon his melancholy state. After a while Bruce strikes up a friendship with fellow inmate Jill (Nanette Newman) and under her influence, he begins to enjoy life again. Falling deeply in love, Bruce and Jill decide to get married against the wishes of the home's owners. Faced with the prospect of having to move out of the home and seek work, will Bruce's and Jill's love survive? Sensitively directed by Bryan Forbes (Whistle Down the Wind, The Stepford Wives), THE RAGING MOON is a tender love story featuring strong performances from Newman and McDowell

  • The League Of Gentlemen [1960]The League Of Gentlemen | DVD | (26/01/2004) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    The League of Gentlemen is a sardonic crime drama in which Jack Hawkins plays an embittered retired army officer who recruits seven fellow ex-soldiers to carry out a bank raid with military precision. The film presents an England between post-war austerity and the more liberated 1960s where traditional moral certainties were rapidly being discarded; a London where ex-officers left on the scrapheap at war's end could justify turning their military experience to armed robbery. Unfortunately the tale is neither particularly amusing or thrilling, with an overlong central detour via an army camp prefacing the exciting heist and a largely anti-climactic ending. Nevertheless Hawkins effectively subverts his heroic officer type from The Cruel Sea (1953) and The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), and there's excellent support from a great cast including Nigel Patrick, Richard Attenborough and Roger Livesey. Bryan Forbes not only wrote the cynical screenplay but costarred with wife Nanette Newman in her first significant screen role. More influential than truly classic, The League of Gentlemen has lent its name to a modern BBC comedy, an "Extraordinary" comic strip-turned-movie, and proved the template for heist films ever since, including both versions of The Italian Job (1969 and 2003). On the DVD:The League of Gentlemen is presented in an anamorphically enhanced 16:9 transfer from an excellent condition print and mostly looks and sounds fine. There's minimal print damage, though sadly Philip Green's ironically patriotic main title music suffers from significant distortion. The only extra is the original trailer, which is now something of a period piece itself. --Gary S Dalkin

  • Faces in the Dark [DVD]Faces in the Dark | DVD | (28/11/2011) from £17.53   |  Saving you £-4.54 (-34.90%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Faces In The Dark is a suspenseful drama by director David Eady. Richard Hammond (John Gregson) owns a factory, and on the very day his wife Christine (Mai Zetterling) is coming to his office to tell him she wants a divorce, he is accidentally blinded during an experiment. His wife relents in her decision, but Richard is still as abrasive as ever, and now the bumpy spots in his personality are made worse by self-pity and a suspicion that he is losing his sanity. Meanwhile, Richard begins to suspect that the cool and aloof Christine and Richard's partner conspire against him, but as a blind man he has fewer resources to pinpoint why he is suspicious....

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