"Actor: Wendy Hiller"

  • A Man For All Seasons (Masters Of Cinema) (Dual Format) (Blu-ray & DVD)A Man For All Seasons (Masters Of Cinema) (Dual Format) (Blu-ray & DVD) | Blu Ray | (20/02/2017) from £11.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Robert Bolt's successful play was not considered a hot commercial property by Columbia Pictures--a period piece about a moral issue without a star, without even a love story. Perhaps that's why Columbia left director Fred Zinnemann alone to make A Man for All Seasons, as long as he stuck to a relatively small budget. The results took everyone by surprise, as the talky morality play became a box-office hit and collected the top Oscars for 1966. At the play's heart is the standoff between King Henry VIII (Robert Shaw, in young lion form) and Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield, in an Oscar-winning performance). Henry wants More's official approval of divorce, but More's strict ethical and religious code will not let him waffle. More's rectitude is a source of exasperation to Cardinal Wolsey (Orson Welles in a cameo), who chides, "If you could just see facts flat on without that horrible moral squint." Zinnemann's approach is all simplicity, and indeed the somewhat prosaic staging doesn't create a great deal of cinematic excitement. But the language is worth savoring, and the ethical politics are debated with all the calm and majesty of an absorbing chess game. --Robert Horton

  • Clochemerle [DVD]Clochemerle | DVD | (04/11/2013) from £11.05   |  Saving you £8.94 (80.90%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Based on the classic comic French novel, adapted for television by the acclaimed comedy writing team of Ray Galton and Alan Simpson (Hancock/Steptoe & Son); welcome to the small French village of Clochemerle. Nestled in the Beaujolais region of France, this happy little enclave has avoided all hints of modernity, producing fi ne wine in an atmosphere of timeless calm and culture... until now. Now, in the autumn of 1922, the mayor wants to build a new public edifice, something that will draw a...

  • All Passion Spent: The Complete Series [DVD]All Passion Spent: The Complete Series | DVD | (10/10/2016) from £6.89   |  Saving you £8.10 (117.56%)   |  RRP £14.99

    Oscar-winning stage and screen veteran Wendy Hiller brings characteristic subtlety, grace and quiet determination to the role of a recently widowed woman who intends to relish her newfound freedom in this acclaimed three-part drama. Adapting Vita Sackville-West's classic story, All Passion Spent received four BAFTA nominations and co-stars Harry Andrews, Maurice Denham, Phyllis Calvert, Graham Crowden and Geoffrey Bayldon. Lady Slane sits beside the body of her husband in a bedroom of their elegant home. The handsome, distinguished Henry Holland, Prime Minister, Viceroy of India and Earl of Slane, has died at the age of 94. As her children ponder what is to be done with mother, 85-year-old Lady Slane realises that for the first time in her life, she is free to live where, and how, she chooses. And after more than half a century as a dutiful and loving wife, she revels in her new-found independence and the company of new friends... despite the wishes of her family.

  • The David Lynch Collection [1982]The David Lynch Collection | DVD | (25/08/2008) from £11.49   |  Saving you £8.50 (73.98%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Set Comprises: Inland EmpireDavid Lynch's first film since the award-winning Mulholland Drive (and his first shot completely on digital) is a complex Hollywood mystery that blurs the lines between fantasy and reality and features an astonishing performance by Laura Dern. Dern plays Nikki Grace an actress preparing for her biggest role yet a Hollywood movie from an acclaimed director (played by Jeremy Irons) opposite an amorous leading man (Justin Theroux). But when she finds herself falling for her co-star she realizes that her life is beginning to mimic the fictional film that they're shooting. Adding to her confusion is the revelation that the current film is a remake of a doomed polish production that was never finished due to an unspeakable tragedy. Mulholland DriveBeautiful bizarre and strangely addictive Mulholland Drive begins as a botched hit results in the meeting of bruised brunette amnesiac Rita (Laura Harring) and blonde would-be Hollywood actress Betty (Naomi Watts - King Kong 21 Grams). Taking the viewer on a memorable neo-noir trip through Hollywood's dark underbelly Lynch dispenses with a conventional narrative in favour of an hallucinogenic assault on the senses that will stay with you long after the credits roll. Elephant ManDavid Lynch creator of Twin Peaks and acclaimed director of 'Eraserhead' 'Blue Velvet' and 'Wild At Heart' directs this bizarre but true story of courage and human dignity. John Hurt gives the performance of a lifetime as John Merrick the worst ""freak"" known to Victorian medical science a man whose body is hideously distorted into a grotesque parody of an elephant. Rescued from a travelling freak show by Sir Frederick Treves Merrick gradually reveals himself to be a strangely sweet and gentle man remarkably unembittered by the degradation and torment he suffered at the circus. Beautifully shot by Freddie Francis and with an excellent supporting cast including Sir John Gielgud Anne Bancroft and Dame Wendy Hiller 'The Elephant Man' is a compelling moving and enchanting story. The film was nominated for eight Oscars including Best Picture Best Director and Best Actor. Short Films of David Lynch This is a collection of David's early student and commissioned work this includes: 1. Six Figures Getting Sick (Six Times) 2. The Alphabet 3. The Grandmother 4. The Amputee 5. The Cowboy and the Frenchman 6. Premonitions Following an Evil Deed 7. External links

  • The Elephant Man [Blu-ray]The Elephant Man | Blu Ray | (13/01/2014) from £9.99   |  Saving you £15.00 (187.73%)   |  RRP £22.99

    You could only see his eyes behind the layers of makeup in The Elephant Man but those expressive orbs earned John Hurt a well-deserved Oscar nomination for his moving portrayal of John Merrick, the grotesquely deformed Victorian man. Inarticulate and abused, Merrick is the virtual slave of a carnival barker (Freddie Jones) until dedicated London doctor Frederick Treves (Anthony Hopkins in a powerfully understated performance) rescues him and offers him an existence with dignity. Anne Bancroft co-stars as the actress whose visit to Merrick makes him a social curiosity, with John Gielgud and Wendy Hiller as dubious hospital staffers won over by Merrick. David Lynch earned his only Oscar nominations as director and co-writer of this sombre drama, which he shot in a rich black-and-white palette, a sometimes stark, sometimes dreamy visual style that at times recalls the offbeat expressionism of his first film, Eraserhead. It remains a perfect marriage between traditional Hollywood historical drama and Lynch's unique cinematic eye, a compassionate human tale delivered in a gothic vein. The film earned eight Oscar nominations in all and though it left the Oscar ceremony empty-handed, its dramatic power and handsome yet haunting imagery remain just as strong today. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com On the DVD: Being black and white, it's easier to judge the digital transfer in terms of shade and thankfully this print looks just fine. There's a little confusion over the sound, however, which is advertised as Stereo on the box but says Mono on the Audio Menu. It certainly seems to be a basic Dolby stereo but it's a shame Lynch hasn't given it the personal touch since he's obsessed with mixing his films' sound himself. From the nicely thought-out animated menus there's a gallery of 20 photos and a misguiding, dramatic theatrical trailer. The only other extra is a 64-page book of which only 10 pages relate directly to the film (the rest re-tell Lynch's career and the real Elephant Man's life). --Paul Tonks

  • A Man For All Seasons [1966]A Man For All Seasons | DVD | (12/02/2007) from £5.38   |  Saving you £7.61 (141.45%)   |  RRP £12.99

    A Man For All Seasons: a motion picture for all time! Winner of six Academy Awards - including 1966 Best Picture - 'A Man For All Seasons' stars Paul Scofield as Sir Thomas More a respected English statesman whose steadfast refusal to recognise King Henry VIII's marriage to Anne Boleyn cost him his head. Featuring an all-star supporting cast - Wendy Hiller Leo McKern Robert Shaw Orson Welles Susannah York and Vanessa Redgrave - and directed by two-time Oscar-winner Fred Zinnemann Robert Bolt's A Man For All Seasons is ""a picture that inspires admiration courage and thought."" - The New York Times.

  • The Elephant Man [1980]The Elephant Man | DVD | (14/05/2001) from £11.84   |  Saving you £9.14 (103.28%)   |  RRP £17.99

    You could only see his eyes behind the layers of makeup in The Elephant Man but those expressive orbs earned John Hurt a well-deserved Oscar nomination for his moving portrayal of John Merrick, the grotesquely deformed Victorian man. Inarticulate and abused, Merrick is the virtual slave of a carnival barker (Freddie Jones) until dedicated London doctor Frederick Treves (Anthony Hopkins in a powerfully understated performance) rescues him and offers him an existence with dignity. Anne Bancroft co-stars as the actress whose visit to Merrick makes him a social curiosity, with John Gielgud and Wendy Hiller as dubious hospital staffers won over by Merrick. David Lynch earned his only Oscar nominations as director and co-writer of this sombre drama, which he shot in a rich black-and-white palette, a sometimes stark, sometimes dreamy visual style that at times recalls the offbeat expressionism of his first film, Eraserhead. It remains a perfect marriage between traditional Hollywood historical drama and Lynch's unique cinematic eye, a compassionate human tale delivered in a gothic vein. The film earned eight Oscar nominations in all and though it left the Oscar ceremony empty-handed, its dramatic power and handsome yet haunting imagery remain just as strong today. --Sean Axmaker, Amazon.com On the DVD: Being black and white, it's easier to judge the digital transfer in terms of shade and thankfully this print looks just fine. There's a little confusion over the sound, however, which is advertised as Stereo on the box but says Mono on the Audio Menu. It certainly seems to be a basic Dolby stereo but it's a shame Lynch hasn't given it the personal touch since he's obsessed with mixing his films' sound himself. From the nicely thought-out animated menus there's a gallery of 20 photos and a misguiding, dramatic theatrical trailer. The only other extra is a 64-page book of which only 10 pages relate directly to the film (the rest re-tell Lynch's career and the real Elephant Man's life). --Paul Tonks

  • I Know Where I'm Going [1945]I Know Where I'm Going | DVD | (07/07/2003) from £3.99   |  Saving you £6.00 (60.10%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Having seen I Know Where I'm Going, Martin Scorsese (a huge fan of filmmakers Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger) declared that there were no more classics to be made in cinema. The film tells the story of Wendy Hiller's unromantic but determined young bride-to-be Joan Webster, setting forth to the Isle of Mull to marry an elderly millionaire. However, on reaching Kiloran she's prevented by adverse weather from reaching the island and must bunk down in a hotel with naval lieutenant and, it transpires, penniless Laird Torquil McNeil (Roger Livesey). It's not hard to predict the outcome of this saga but getting there is a wonderful journey. Hiller, more famous for playing less pretty elders in later life in the likes of Murder on the Orient Express, is splendid as the softening pragmatist, while Livesey, frequently used by Powell/Pressburger, again embodies a combination of British no-nonsense decency and romanticism. The strongest, most magical presence in the movie, even in black and white, is that of the Scottish scenery, beautiful and volatile and somehow serving to aid and abet the happy ending. --David Stubbs

  • Murder On The Orient Express (Re-sleeve) [DVD]Murder On The Orient Express (Re-sleeve) | DVD | (14/08/2017) from £5.29   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Elegant, all-star production, introducing Albert Finney as the first screen Hercule Poirot. A no-good American tycoon lies dead with twelve dagger wounds, but which of the passengers is the guilty party? Includes an Oscar® winning performance from Ingrid Bergman

  • Murder On The Orient Express [Blu-ray]Murder On The Orient Express | Blu Ray | (23/10/2017) from £12.09   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Just the name "Orient Express" conjures up images of a bygone era. Add an all-star cast (including Sean Connery, Ingrid Bergman, Jacqueline Bisset and Lauren Bacall, to name a few) and Agatha Christie's delicious plot and how can you go wrong? Particularly if you add in Albert Finney as Christie's delightfully pernickety sleuth, Hercule Poirot. Someone has knocked off nasty Richard Widmark on this train trip and, to Poirot's puzzlement, everyone seems to have a motive--just the set-up for a terrific whodunit. Though it seems like an ensemble film, director Sidney Lumet gives each of his stars their own solo and each makes the most of it. Bergman went so far as to win an Oscar for her role. But the real scene-stealer is the ever-reliable Finney as the eccentric detective who never misses a trick. --Marshall Fine

  • The Elephant Man [1980]The Elephant Man | DVD | (04/08/2008) from £7.99   |  Saving you £10.00 (55.60%)   |  RRP £17.99

    David Lynch creator of Twin Peaks and acclaimed director of 'Eraserhead' 'Blue Velvet' and 'Wild At Heart' directs this bizarre but true story of courage and human dignity. John Hurt gives the performance of a lifetime as John Merrick the worst ""freak"" known to Victorian medical science a man whose body is hideously distorted into a grotesque parody of an elephant. Rescued from a travelling freak show by Sir Frederick Treves Merrick gradually reveals himself to be a strangely sweet and gentle man remarkably unembittered by the degradation and torment he suffered at the circus. Beautifully shot by Freddie Francis and with an excellent supporting cast including Sir John Gielgud Anne Bancroft and Dame Wendy Hiller 'The Elephant Man' is a compelling moving and enchanting story. The film was nominated for eight Oscars including Best Picture Best Director and Best Actor.

  • Bicentennial Man [1999]Bicentennial Man | DVD | (06/03/2006) from £6.73   |  Saving you £-0.74 (-12.40%)   |  RRP £5.99

    From director Chris Columbus comes this original funny and heart-warming film. When Richard Martin (Sam Neill) introduced a robot named Andrew (Robin Williams) to the family nobody expects anything more than an ordinary household appliance. But this is no ordinary robot! Andrew is a unique machine with real emotions a sense of humour and a burning curiosity to discover what it means to be human. Over the course of his service with the Martins spanning two hundred years and several

  • Classic Films Triple - The Life And Death of Colonel Blimp/A Matter Of Life And Death/I Know Where I'm Going [1943]Classic Films Triple - The Life And Death of Colonel Blimp/A Matter Of Life And Death/I Know Where I'm Going | DVD | (06/10/2008) from £16.20   |  Saving you £-3.21 (N/A%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Titles Comprise: Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp: Drama about the life of Clive Candy an English soldier who served in three wars (Boer World War I World War II) and had relationships with three women along the way (each played by Deborah Kerr). Despite Candy's tours-of-duty he harbors no ill will towards the Germans instead he believes they have been the pawns of military leaders. Colonel Blimp an old befuddled British military officer reminisces about his past glories in this witty war satire. A Matter Of Life And Death: It's night over Europe the night of the 2nd of May 1945. A crippled Lancaster Bomber struggles home across the English Channel all crew dead save for the young pilot desperately scanning the radio for signs of life. His prayers are answered. June (Hunter) a young radio operator picks up his signal and in the final moments of the young flyer's life a special bond is formed. The next morning washed up on an English beach Squadron Leader Peter Carter (Niven) is alive he finds June and the two fall in love. Somehow he survived. It's a miracle or is it? Peter Carter should have died that night; a heavenly escort missed him in the fog above the channel and now he must face the celestial court of appeal for his right to live. I Know Where I'm Going: In Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger's stunningly photographed comedy romance flourishes in an unlikely place - the bleak and moody Scottish Hebrides. Wendy Hiller stars as a headstrong young woman who travels to Scotland to marry a rich lord. Stranded by stormy weather she meets a handsome naval officer (Roger Livesey) who threatens to thwart her carefully laid-out life plans...

  • Separate Tables (DVD + Blu-ray)Separate Tables (DVD + Blu-ray) | Blu Ray | (20/08/2018) from £7.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Delbert Mann's 1958 classic MGM drama Separate Tables, based on a Terence Rattigan play and co-scripted by Rattigan himself, is a star-studded character study of a group of residents at a small British seaside town. Lovely but vulnerable Anne Shankland (Rita Hayworth) travels to the hotel in hopes of starting over with her ex-husband, John (Burt Lancaster), but she does not know that he is already engaged to Pat Cooper (Wendy Hiller), the manager of the hotel. Meanwhile, Mrs Railton-bell (Gladys Cooper) discovers the hidden truth about war veteran Major Pollack (David Niven). Considered daring in its day due to its frank discussions of sexual topics, Separate Tables was nominated for seven Academy Awards, and won for Best Actor (David Niven) and Best Supporting Actress (Wendy Hiller). Special features: Other extras TBC Fully illustrated booklet with new writing on the film and full film credits

  • Pygmalion [1938]Pygmalion | DVD | (06/08/2007) from £6.99   |  Saving you £13.00 (185.98%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Later adapted as `My Fair Lady George Bernard Shaws wonderful comedy of manners is given its finest screen outing in this 1938 production. Nominated for four Oscars Shaw himself was one of the recipients of the award for best screenplay. Snobbish Professor Higgins has a wager with his friend Colonel Pickering that with the right instruction he can pass off cockney `gutter-snipe Eliza Doolittle as a `lady among high society. Taken under his wing Eliza is given rigorous coaching i

  • Bicentennial Man [2000]Bicentennial Man | DVD | (03/07/2000) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £3.99

    Bicentennial Man was stung at the 1999 box office, due no doubt in part to poor timing during a backlash against Robin Williams and his treacly performances in two other, then-recent, releases, Jakob the Liar and Patch Adams. But this near-approximation of a science-fiction epic, based on works by Isaac Asimov and directed, with uncharacteristic seriousness of purpose, by Chris Columbus (Mrs Doubtfire), is much better than one would have known from the knee-jerk negativity and box-office indifference. Williams plays Andrew, a robot programmed for domestic chores and sold to an upper-middle-class family, the Martins, in the year 2005. The family patriarch (Sam Neill) recognizes and encourages Andrew's uncommon characteristics, particularly his artistic streak, sensitivity to beauty, humour and independence of spirit. In so doing, he sets Williams's tin man on a two-century journey to become more human than most human beings. As adapted by screenwriter Nicholas Kazan, the movie's scale is novelistic, though Columbus isn't the man to embrace with Spielbergian confidence its sweeping possibilities. Instead, the Home Alone director shakes off his familiar tendencies to pander and matures, finally, as a captivating storyteller. But what really makes this film matter is its undercurrent of deep yearning, the passion of Andrew as a convert to the human race and his willingness to sacrifice all to give and take love. Williams rises to an atypical challenge here as a futuristic Everyman, relying, perhaps for the first time, on his considerable iconic value to make the point that becoming human means becoming more like Robin Williams. Nothing wrong with that. -- Tom Keogh, Amazon.com

  • The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (Limited Edition) [Blu-ray] [2019]The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (Limited Edition) | Blu Ray | (24/06/2019) from £15.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Based on the acclaimed novel by Brian Moore, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne was the final feature film to be made by celebrated filmmaker Jack Clayton (The Innocents, The Pumpkin Eater), and boasts a truly outstanding performance by multi-award-winning actor Maggie Smith. In 1950s Belfast, penniless spinster Judith Hearne (Smith) falls for charismatic James (Bob Hoskins). Succumbing to his attentions, Judith makes a series of profound changes to her life, including re-evaluating her deep relationship with her church, to enable the love for which she so desperately yearns. Poignant and powerful, The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne was the recipient of a BAFTA award for Smith, but has since become somewhat overlooked. Now finally available on Blu-ray for the very first time, one of the finest British films of the 1980s is presented in a brand new 2K restoration from the original negatives, supervised and approved by cinematographer Peter Hannan. Limited Edition Features: New 2K restoration by Powerhouse Films from the original negative, supervised and approved by cinematographer Peter Hannan Original stereo audio Remembering Judith Hearne (2019): featuring new and exclusive interviews with actors Maggie Smith and Ian McNeice Remembering Mary (2019): new and exclusive interview with actor Rudi Davies Selected scenes commentary with film historian Neil Sinyard Original theatrical trailer Image gallery: on-set and promotional photography New and improved English subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing Limited edition exclusive booklet featuring Pauline Kael's appraisal of the film, an overview of contemporary critical responses, archival articles, and film credits World premiere on Blu-ray Limited Edition of 3,000 copies All extras subject to change

  • Outcast Of The Islands [DVD]Outcast Of The Islands | DVD | (23/04/2012) from £9.79   |  Saving you £6.20 (38.80%)   |  RRP £15.99

    The clash of cultures seen in Outcast of the Islands, is displaced between the Europeans (Trevor Howard plays a Dutchman), Wendy Hillier, Robert Morley and Ralph Richardson. The other, native is occupied by the partially blind Babalatchi (George Coulouris) and Aissa (Kerima) and a multitude of nameless indigenous characters. The opponents to the whites and, to a lesser extent, of the natives are the Arabs, led by Abdullah. The struggle by all three groups for mastery of the economic opportunities of these territories is crystallised in attempts by Willems, an involuntary exile to satisfy his own needs, who along the way compromises his livelihood.

  • Major BarbaraMajor Barbara | DVD | (06/08/2007) from £6.99   |  Saving you £13.00 (185.98%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Barbara Undershaft is the idealistic daughter of a wealthy munitions manufacturer. A major in the Salvation Army she is devoted to a crusade against capitalists such as her father and has little time for the romantic intentions of the love-struck Adolphus a Greek professor. She is shocked when the Army accepts a large donation from her father and hands back her uniform. When she agrees to take a tour of his factory there are further surprises.

  • A Man For All Seasons [1966]A Man For All Seasons | DVD | (26/11/2001) from £25.99   |  Saving you £-6.00 (-30.00%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Robert Bolt's successful play, A Man for All Seasons, was not considered a hot commercial property by Columbia Pictures--a period piece about a moral issue without a star, without even a love story. Perhaps that's why Columbia left director Fred Zinnemann alone to make the film as long as he stuck to a relatively small budget. The results took everyone by surprise, as the talky morality play became a box-office hit and collected the top Oscars for 1966. At the play's heart is the standoff between King Henry VIII (Robert Shaw, in young lion form) and Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield, in an Oscar-winning performance). Henry wants More's official approval of divorce, but More's strict ethical and religious code will not let him waffle. More's rectitude is a source of exasperation to Cardinal Wolsey (Orson Welles in a cameo), who chides, "If you could just see facts flat on without that horrible moral squint". Zinnemann's approach is all simplicity, and indeed the somewhat prosaic staging doesn't create a great deal of cinematic excitement. But the language is worth savouring, and the ethical politics are debated with all the calm and majesty of an absorbing chess game. --Robert Horton, Amazon.com

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