Road To Perdition Blu Ray

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From the Oscar winning director of 'American Beauty' comes a '30s gangster tale with Tom Hanks as Michael Sullivan, a hit man for an Irish gang in the Midwest during the Depression.

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Released
24 May 2010
Directors
Actors
Format
Blu Ray 
Publisher
20th Century Fox Home Entertainment 
Classification
Runtime
116 minutes 
Features
PAL 
Barcode
5039036043830 
  • Average Rating for Road To Perdition [Blu-ray] [2002] - 3 out of 5


    (based on 1 user reviews)
  • Road To Perdition [Blu-ray] [2002]
    Peter Loew

    Road To Perdition has recently been transferred to Blu-ray and it looks fantastic. The image is sharp, the colours are vivid and there is very little grain at all. Despite probably not needing too much work it's clearly been treated to an excellent restoration job. Professional film critics love this film and having never seen it before, despite it being released in 2002, I was eager to buy it to find out if it lived up to the hype. I was really looking forward to it and I was hoping to be amazed. Unfortunately, despite everything being in place, such as a well respected and world renowned composer (Thomas Newman), award winning director (Sam Mendes) and an exceptionally talented cinematography (Conrad Hall), to make this film a sure-fire success, in my humble opinion, it fails as entertainment. It does however succeed as a piece of cinematic art.

    Plot wise it's fairly simple, which is the biggest problem. Mike Sullivan (Tom Hanks) works as a hit man for crime boss John Rooney (Paul Newman). Rooney is like a father to Sullivan. But when Sullivan's own son sees something he shouldn't he is forced to go on the run from Rooney in order to protect his son while also seeking vengeance. Harlen Maguire (Jude Law) is the man sent to track down and kill Sullivan. It's not exactly convoluted. Put simply: it's not the Odyssey. Yet it could have been far more rewarding if there had been more attention to detail in writing the characters and in the plotting. It's sure a shame.
    Before directing Road To Perdition (2002), Berkshire born, Sam Mendes had already proved himself to be an extremely competent director having been at the helm of American Beauty (1999), however working with David Self's rather one-dimensional screenplay on Road To Perdition, he is short of his own high standards. Since then Mendes has directed the beautifully photographed, but emotionally unsatisfying Jarhead (2005) and the award winning, but equally unconvincing, Revolutionary Road (2008). It seems that Mendes is fated to direct films that look and sound wonderful but have very little in the way of heart. It appears that he has a tendency to go for style over substance.

    There is a lot of acting talent on display in Road To Perdition. Tom Hanks takes the part of the central character but sadly I didn't find him particularly convincing as a somewhat reluctant mobster turned vengeful killer. Jude Law, although putting in a decent performance, doesn't turn up until almost the hour mark, while the late, great, screen legend Paul Newman is also criminally under-used. It's strange that he would play so little a part in the film as at almost two hours the film feels stretched. The pacing is pedestrian and there is also a disturbing lack of action for a gangster film.

    Road To Perdition is however, unarguably, visually and aurally stunning and the production valves are very high. Yet this simply highlights the insubstantiality of the script. This was reflected in the box office takings that failed to ignite, not getting much past the $100m mark, despite an estimated production budget of $80m.

    Fortunately as so many critics have praised Road To Perdition endlessly it did well in the home entertainment market hence it's release on Blu-ray. Therefore should you buy it, or receive it as a present there is no need to worry. It will still make an excellent trophy DVD. It will, superficially, at least give almost any collection enhanced respectability. So if your not-so-film-savvy-friends see Road To Perdition on your DVD shelf, you should quite simply nod and knowingly make mention of Conrad Hall's stunning cinematography or Thomas Newman's superb score. Speak confidently as if you were Danny Leigh, the film critic for the Guardian newspaper and tell them it's the new Godfather. As long as you don't accidentally let them watch it, you'll be fine.

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Tom Hanks stars in this gangster drama set in the American Midwest during the 1930s. Twelve-year-old Michael Sullivan Jr is curious about what his father (Hanks) does for a living, and one night decides to hide in his car as he goes off to work. It soon transpires that the elder Sullivan is a hitman for the mob, and when young Michael witnesses a killing carried out by the gangster boss' son Connor (Daniel Craig), it starts off a chain of events which will mark Michael's life forever. Co-starring Paul Newman and Jude Law and directed by Sam Mendes.

Tom Hanks stars in this gangster drama set in the American Midwest during the 1930s. Twelve-year-old Michael Sullivan Jr is curious about what his father (Hanks) does for a living, and one night decides to hide in his car as he goes off to work. It soon transpires that the elder Sullivan is a hitman for the mob, and when young Michael witnesses a killing carried out by the gangster boss' son Connor (Daniel Craig), it starts off a chain of events which will mark Michael's life forever. Co-starring Paul Newman and Jude Law and directed by Sam Mendes.

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