Tales of Beatrix Potter Blu Ray

| Blu Ray

Digitally restored the classic animated series celebrates it 40th anniversary with a special Double Play edition. Entertaining children's stories danced by the Royal Ballet wearing animal masks. Music by John Lanchbery choreography by Frederick Ashton. The adventures are alive with same energy and passion of the books and feature unheard melodies from British Museum manuscripts recovered and transcribed by composer John Lanchbery. As the characters waltz their way across set to the rhythm of the songs you'll join in with the merriment and hot step with the cast - a... must see treat for the entire family. [show more]

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Released
04 April 2011
Directors
Actors
Format
Blu Ray 
Publisher
Elevation Sales 
Classification
Runtime
85 minutes 
Features
Colour, PAL 
Barcode
5055201816122 
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The Royal Ballet perform the stories of Beatrix Potter, bringing characters including Peter Rabbit, Jemima Puddleduck, Jeremy Fisher, and Squirrel Nutkin to life against an English countryside background. Choreography is by Sir Frederick Ashton and the music is composed by John Lanchbery.

Please note this is a region 2 DVD and region B Blu-ray. It will require a region B Blu-ray player to play the Blu-ray and DVD or a Region 2 DVD player for the DVD.   The Royal Ballet perform the stories of Beatrix Potter, bringing characters including Peter Rabbit, Jemima Puddleduck, Jeremy Fisher, and Squirrel Nutkin to life against an English countryside background. Choreography is by Sir Frederick Ashton and the music is composed by John Lanchbery.