"Director: David Ayer"

  • The Professionals - Vol. 1The Professionals - Vol. 1 | DVD | (26/09/2005) from £22.93   |  Saving you £17.06 (42.70%)   |  RRP £39.99

    Thrown together to join George Cowley's new C15 organisation....Hard men no patience nor time for subtleties. Charged with combating terrorists criminals and corruption wherever they find it. Capable of using any means necessary. The only people they can trust are themselves... Features all 14 episodes from the first series broadcast in 1977 uncut and digitally remastered!

  • Street Kings / Street Kings 2 Double Pack [DVD] [2008]Street Kings / Street Kings 2 Double Pack | DVD | (04/02/2013) from £9.43   |  Saving you £3.56 (37.75%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Street Kings: Directo David Ayer brings you Street Kings an intense police thriller starring Keanu Reeves, Forest Whitaker, Hugh Laurie and Chris Evans. Keanu Reeves is Tom Ludlow - a veteran LAPD Vice Detective - hell bent on finding the killers of his former partner, Detective Terrance Washington (Terry Crews). Forest Whitaker stars as Captain Wander, Ludlow's supervisor, whose duties include keeping him within the confines of the law and out of the clutches of Inte...

  • The Professionals Complete Boxset - REPACK [DVD]The Professionals Complete Boxset - REPACK | DVD | (03/10/2011) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £149.99

    Every episode of this much loved classic crime TV show featuring that unforgettable theme tune!A brilliant, fast-paced, violent and hard-hitting action series, The Professionals chronicles the lives and exploits of the men of covert British security unit CI5 (Criminal Intelligence 5), in particular the unit's top operative partnership of ex-cop Ray Doyle (Martin Shaw) and former mercenary and ex-SAS paratrooper William Bodie (Lewis Collins) and their superior officer, the gruff but fatherly George Cowley (Gordon Jackson).

  • Street Kings / Street Kings 2: Motor City [DVD]Street Kings / Street Kings 2: Motor City | DVD | (03/10/2011) from £32.37   |  Saving you £-12.38 (-61.90%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Street Kings Street Kings is a pungent bouquet of corruption, violence, multi-ethnic mayhem, macho glee laced with macho angst, and fluorescently obscene dialogue from the mind of James Ellroy. Its hero, though he'd scarcely consent to be called one, is L.A. police detective Tom Ludlow (Keanu Reeves), for whom life is a wound that won't heal and dealing out retribution to scumbags is the ongoing treatment. Ludlow's the star player--"the tip of the [expletive] spear"--on a team of detectives headed by Capt. Jack Wander (Forest Whitaker). Coach Wander relies on his boys to keep breaking lurid cases, usually through deeply darkside underground work, and raising his profile with the media and the department. In pursuit of these goals, nothing is forbidden except failure, and the truth is what you make it look like. This is familiar Ellroy territory, most effectively translated to the screen in L.A. Confidential (which should have won the 1997 Oscar, and would have if Titanic hadn't launched that year). If you know Ellroy's ground game, you can pretty much guess where Street Kings is going, and where it's been. Still, the twists and torques of its urban road-rage course maintain the centrifugal force needed to hold us in our seats (a tactical highlight: refrigerator adapted as rolling barricade), and the movie keeps bopping us with oddball casting coups: comic Jay Mohr and Northern Exposure/Sex and the City veteran John Corbett as two members of Coach Warden's gonzo detective squad; Cedric the Entertainer doing a nicely nuanced turn as a street creature; Hugh Laurie doing a less-hyper version of House, if House worked Internal Affairs. The problem is that director David Ayer keeps everything intense. Dialogues are shot too close-up, line readings are too strident, the action is too nonstop slam. Recall Curtis Hanson's L.A. Confidential and the mind's eye summons up a whole spectrum of existence, mood, place, historical period, emotional investment; there's an amplitude to the picture and the sensibility bringing it to us, something besides the whodunit and the endless rap sheet of nasty what-they-done. Everything in Street Kings is one-note, and with Keanu Reeves playing it implosive and Forest Whitaker locked in crazier-than-an-outhouse-rat mode, that's no way to stay the course. --Richard T. Jameson

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