"Director: Norman Jewison"

  • Jesus Christ Superstar [1973]Jesus Christ Superstar | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £4.99   |  Saving you £11.00 (68.80%)   |  RRP £15.99

    Jesus Christ Superstar is a phenomenon: a brilliant example of modern moviemaking that translates a legendary rock opera to the screen. Told entirely in song images and music the story focuses on the last week of Christ's life his betrayal and crucifixion seen from the point of view of Judas. Producer-director Norman Jewison shot his film entirely on location in Israel and fills the screen with a never-ending series of dazzling images.

  • In The Heat Of The Night [DVD]In The Heat Of The Night | DVD | (25/02/2013) from £5.99   |  Saving you £4.00 (66.78%)   |  RRP £9.99

    An African American detective is asked to investigate a murder in a racist southern town.

  • Fiddler On The Roof [DVD]Fiddler On The Roof | DVD | (13/01/2014) from £5.99   |  Saving you £4.00 (66.78%)   |  RRP £9.99

    The heartwarming scenes and uplifting songs of a timeless musical masterpiece meet the spectacular sound and picture quality ofBlu-ray for the first time ever to celebrate the film’s 40th Anniversary—bursting with hours of extras that will keep you entertained from sunrise to sunset! Nominated for eight Academy Awards including Best Picture Best Actor (Topol) and Directing (Norman Jewison) Fiddler on the Roof tells the life-affirming story of a poor Jewish milkman whose love pride and faith help him cope with the challenges of raising a family in czarist Russia.

  • Jesus Christ Superstar [Blu-ray]Jesus Christ Superstar | Blu Ray | (20/05/2013) from £7.99   |  Saving you £7.00 (46.70%)   |  RRP £14.99

    Available for the first time on Blu-Ray, Jesus Christ Superstar (1973). Rock opera of the last week in the life of Jesus Christ. The Last Supper and Crucifixion are events which impel this mystical/musical translation of the famous Broadway rock opera. Special Features: An Exclusive Interview with Master Lyricist Tim Rice Photo Gallery Jesus Christ Superstar Theatrical Trailer Feature Commentary with Director Norman Jewison and Actor Ted Neely

  • The Thomas Crown Affair [1968]The Thomas Crown Affair | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.49   |  Saving you £10.50 (191.26%)   |  RRP £15.99

    Millionaire businessman Thomas Crown (Steve McQueen) is also a high-stakes thief; his latest caper is an elaborate heist at a Boston bank. Why does he do it? For the same reason he flies gliders, bets on golf strokes and races dune buggies: he needs the thrill to feel alive. Insurance investigator Vicky Anderson (Faye Dunaway) gets her own thrills by busting crooks, and she's got Crown in her cross hairs. Naturally, these two will get it on, because they have a lot in common: they're not people, they're walking clothes racks. (McQueen looks like he'd rather be in jeans than Crown's natty three-piece suits.) The Thomas Crown Affair is a catalogue of 60s conventions, from its clipped editing style to its photographic trickery (the inventive Haskell Wexler behind the camera) to its mod design. You can almost sense director Norman Jewison deciding to "tell his story visually," like those newfangled European films; this would explain the long passages of Michel Legrand's lounge jazz ladled over endless montages of the pretty Dunaway and McQueen at play. (The opening-credits song, "Windmills of Your Mind," won an Oscar.) It's like a "What Kind of Man Reads Playboy?" ad come to life, and much more interesting as a cultural snapshot than a piece of storytelling. --Robert Horton

  • Rollerball [Blu-ray]Rollerball | Blu Ray | (23/03/2015) from £13.99   |  Saving you £6.00 (42.89%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Norman Jewison's dystopian Rollerball portrays a near-future in the aftermath of the Corporate Wars, in which nations have crumbled and conglomerates rule. In place of freedom the people are given bread and circuses: material comfort and rollerball itself. Played on a circular, slanted track by men on skates and motorbikes, this extreme sport is the ultimate extrapolation of the primitive blood lust implicit in many team sports. James Caan is outstanding as Jonathan E, star player with the Houston team. In the elegant detachment of Jewison's direction, emphasised by the stark, alienating use of classical music, there are echoes of Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. Notwithstanding the brilliantly staged arena sequences, Rollerball is essentially about freedom versus conformity and the corruption of unfettered capitalism, with Caan leading an existential rebellion in the tradition of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 which leads to a chilling, apocalyptic finale. Certainly the most prophetic film of the 1970s, Rollerball has an intelligence and power overlooked by those who simply denounce its brutal violence. On the DVD: Rollerball arrives on DVD with clear three-channel Dolby Digital sound, although obviously it lacks the impact of a more modern 5.1 soundtrack. The 1.77:1 transfer is anamorphically enhanced and is generally very sharp and detailed with excellent colour. Some scenes show a lot of grain, but this is presumably a consequence of having to shoot with very fast lenses to capture the swift and dramatic action under indoor lighting conditions. "Return to the Arena--The Making of Rollerball" is a new 25-minute documentary (4:3 with letterboxed film clips) that features Jewison, Harrison and various other personnel reminiscing about the making of the film. The highlight of the extras are commentary tacks from the Jewison and Harrison, and while there is inevitably some overlap of information, and some quite lengthy gaps in Harrison's track, there is also much to interest the serious film buff. Also included is an original seven-minute promotional featurette "From Rome to Rollerball: The Full Circle", the chilling original trailer, the teaser trailer and a trailer for the remake.--Gary S Dalkin

  • Fiddler On The Roof [1971]Fiddler On The Roof | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £8.99   |  Saving you £13.00 (185.98%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Fiddler on the Roof arrived in cinemas in 1971, seven years after the Sheldon Harnick/Jerry Bock musical about Jewish life in a pre-Revolution Russian village first gripped Broadway. Based on the stories of Shalom Aleichem, with its potent mixture of sentiment and religious and historical context, it remains one of the most popular shows of the modern age. With the help of an outstanding performance from Topol as Tevye--the milkman with five daughters kicking at the constraints of tradition--Norman Jewison's captivating film retains a moving intimacy in its portrayal of relationships in changing times. But it also stretches the possibilities of location shooting--in this case the countryside of the former Yugoslavia--further than any musical movie before or since. The villagers are played by the inhabitants of the area, lending a poignant realism to the vibrant crowd scenes. And the cinematography is spectacular, with Jewison's clever use of distance generating an epic feel that helps to explain the story's continuing resonance and popularity. Topol's career-defining star turn is balanced by the warmth and sensitivity of the surrounding performances, particularly Norma Crane as his abrasive wife Golda. British sitcom fans will spot early appearances by Roger Lloyd Pack, and Ruth Madoc as the demonic butcher's wife, Fruma Sarah. At nearly three hours, it's a long emotional haul, but aided by some of the most beautiful songs in musical history, Jewison's Fiddler is ageless. On the DVD: Fiddler on the Roof Special Edition is presented on DVD in widescreen with a Dolby soundtrack that makes a mighty meal of John Williams' Oscar-winning musical adaptation. The most fascinating extras are a making-of documentary that shows a youthful, slightly tetchy Jewison at work, and a 2003 reminiscence in which all of his passion and feel for the piece has survived intact. He shares a commentary with Topol crammed with vivid memories and context. There is also a photographic gallery showing the resources that were used to give the film its authenticity, and Jewison reads extracts from original Aleichem stories. --Piers Ford

  • Only You [1994]Only You | DVD | (01/11/1999) from £6.73   |  Saving you £13.26 (197.03%)   |  RRP £19.99

    While director Norman Jewisons Moonstruck is a romantic cornerstone, this 1994 film is often overlooked. Its a sweet valentine about a young woman, aptly named Faith (Marisa Tomei, never cuter), who chases an unknown man to Europe because the name "Damon Bradley" was once spelled on a Ouija board as her true love. With her sister-in-law (Bonnie Hunt, whose own marriage seems to be falling apart), she travels the streets of Rome looking for Damon Bradley. And lo and behold, she literally runs into a man claiming to be Damon. Is this meant to be? Faith certainly thinks so. Robert Downey Jr. (also never cuter) plays Damon in a role that showcases his charms. He shows his quick wit in handing Faiths advances and his absolute devotion to her when the winds change. Despite the cuteness factor, this is a movie to fall in love with. Jewison and Sven Nykvist (Ingmar Bergmans cameraman) present a sun-kissed Italy so beautiful, you might be tempted to hop on a plane immediately after viewing the movie. --Doug Thomas

  • The Hurricane [2000]The Hurricane | DVD | (05/01/2001) from £4.79   |  Saving you £11.20 (70.00%)   |  RRP £15.99

    Academy award winner Denzel Washington (Glory, Malcolm X) is Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, a man whose dreams of winning the middleweight boxing title were destroyed when he was arrested along with another man for the murders of three people in a New Jersey b

  • The Thrill Of It All [1963]The Thrill Of It All | DVD | (04/04/2005) from £5.00   |  Saving you £4.99 (49.90%)   |  RRP £9.99

    This romantic comedy takes a satirical aim at the frenetic world of television. Happily married Beverly Boyer is the ultimate housewife but her life is about to change dramatically. It seems that the president of a soap company who she has just met sees the clean-cut Beverly as the perfect TV pitchwoman for his product. After the ads air Beverly becomes famous from coast to coast and an even better breadwinner than her husband - who isn't coping with either of these occurrences v

  • Classic Musicals - 5 Film Collection [Blu-ray] [1958] [Region Free]Classic Musicals - 5 Film Collection | Blu Ray | (15/10/2012) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £44.99

    Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: With its clever tunes (including the Oscar-Nominated title song), marvellous cast and enchanting storyline, this delightful romp is lots of fun and simply 'toot sweet' to pass up. Dick Van Dyke stars as eccentric inventor Caractacus Potts, who creates an extraordinary car called Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. It not only drives--but also flies and floats--as it leads him, his two children and his beautiful lady friend, Truly Scrumptious (Sally Ann Howes), into a magi...

  • The Thomas Crown Affair [Blu-ray] [1968]The Thomas Crown Affair | Blu Ray | (02/09/2013) from £8.99   |  Saving you £4.00 (44.49%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Millionaire businessman Thomas Crown (Steve McQueen) is also a high-stakes thief; his latest caper is an elaborate heist at a Boston bank. Why does he do it? For the same reason he flies gliders, bets on golf strokes and races dune buggies: he needs the thrill to feel alive. Insurance investigator Vicky Anderson (Faye Dunaway) gets her own thrills by busting crooks, and she's got Crown in her cross hairs. Naturally, these two will get it on, because they have a lot in common: they're not people, they're walking clothes racks. (McQueen looks like he'd rather be in jeans than Crown's natty three-piece suits.) The Thomas Crown Affair is a catalogue of 60s conventions, from its clipped editing style to its photographic trickery (the inventive Haskell Wexler behind the camera) to its mod design. You can almost sense director Norman Jewison deciding to "tell his story visually," like those newfangled European films; this would explain the long passages of Michel Legrand's lounge jazz ladled over endless montages of the pretty Dunaway and McQueen at play. (The opening-credits song, "Windmills of Your Mind," won an Oscar.) It's like a "What Kind of Man Reads Playboy?" ad come to life, and much more interesting as a cultural snapshot than a piece of storytelling. --Robert Horton

  • Moonstruck [1987]Moonstruck | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £7.58   |  Saving you £5.41 (41.60%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Remember the outfit Cher wore to the Oscars when she won an Academy Award for her performance in this 1987 film? Ay-yi-yi. The actress' more retiring character in this infectious comedy leaps several psychological hurdles just giving her hair a permanent. But then the original screenplay of Moonstruck, by John Patrick Shanley (Joe Versus the Volcano), is a wonderful, gently satirical tale of an Italian-American family dealing with repression and dissatisfaction against a backdrop of cultural expectations. Cher is focused and funny as a widow who feels she should marry an older fellow (Danny Aiello), but then falls for his black-sheep brother (Nicolas Cage). Olympia Dukakis and Vincent Gardenia are perfect as her parents, and John Mahoney (of TV's Frasier) has a memorable, small role as a middle-aged man on the make who gets a lecture from Dukakis's character. Shanley's dialogue is comically stylised in a way that makes one appreciate how much words can inform an actor's performance. Taking its cues from him and director Norman Jewison (And Justice for All), the cast immerse themselves in a pool of hilariously operatic emotion. --Tom Keogh

  • Send Me No Flowers [DVD]Send Me No Flowers | DVD | (04/05/2015) from £5.49   |  Saving you £4.50 (81.97%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Norman Jewison directs one of Hollywood's most famous screen teams, DORIS DAY and ROCK HUDSON as a perky housewife and her hypochondriac husband in this, their third and final film together. Hudson is hilarious as an obsessed hypochondriac who mistakenly overhears his doctor discussing the impending death of a patient. Believing the poor victim is himself, Hudson elicits the help of his friend and neighbour, Tony Randall, to find a new husband for his soon-to-be-widowed wife. Randall, unfortunately, isn't much help as he deals with his upcoming loss by swigging martinis. Alarmed by her husband's increasingly strange behaviour, Day becomes even more frustrated when an old paramour (Clint Walker) shows up at their country club and Hudson encourages his attentions towards her! With it's 'top performers...in top form' ( The Hollywood Reporter), Send Me No Flowers also features Paul Lynde as a side-splitting cemetery plot salesman who 'loves people'. Hal March and Burt Bacharach's title tune is sung by Miss Day, and her costumes, include her sexy boudoir wardrobe, are designed by Jean Louis.

  • Steve McQueen Collection - The Great Escape/The Magnificent Seven/The Thomas Crown Affair/The Sand PebblesSteve McQueen Collection - The Great Escape/The Magnificent Seven/The Thomas Crown Affair/The Sand Pebbles | DVD | (19/02/2007) from £13.49   |  Saving you £-2.12 (-18.60%)   |  RRP £11.37

    The Great Escape (Dir. John Sturges 1963): One of the most ingenious and suspenseful adventure films of all time The Great Escape is a masterful collaboration between director John Sturges screenwriters James Clavell (Shogun) and W.R. Burnett and composer Elmer Bernstein. Based on a true story this film also stars Steve McQueen James Garner Charles Bronson and James Coburn. The Thomas Crown Affair (Dir. Norman Jewson 1968): Thomas Crown (Steve McQueen) is a lone wolf in chic clothing. He's a Boston tycoon who masterminds a daring bank job even though he doesn't need the money. What he needs is the thrill of the heist the adrenaline rush of not getting caught. Catching crooks is where insurance investigator Vicky Anderson (Faye Dunaway) comes in. She always gets her man. But this time she may be too much in love to give him up. McQueen and Dunaway are lovers and adversaries in a stylish cat-and-mouse thriller written by Alan R. Trustman and directed by Norman Jewison. Jewsion makes exciting use of split screen images as the action leaps from the boardroom to the boudoir the polo field to a glider cockpit. The Oscar winning Best Song (1968) ""The Windmills of Your Mind"" sets the perfect tone for the swirl of romance and intrigue... The Magnificent Seven (Dir. John Sturges 1960): Yul Brynner stars as one of seven master gunmen who aid the helpless farmers of an isolated village pitted against an army of marauding bandits in this rousing action tale based on Akira Kurosawa's classic Seven Samurai. Released in 1960 John Sturges' masterpiece garnered an Oscar nomination for Elmer Bernstein (for Best Score) and launched the film careers of Steve McQueen Charles Bronson Robert Vaughn and James Coburn. Sand Pebbles (Dir. Robert Wise 1966): It's the story of China a slumbering giant that rouses itself to the cries of its people - and of the Americans who are caught in its bloody awakening. It's the story of Frenchy (Richard Attenborough) a crewman on the USS San Pablo who kidnaps his Chinese bride from the auction block. Most of all it's the story of Jake Holman (Steve McQueen) a sailor who had given up trying to make peace with anything: including himself.

  • Rollerball [1975] - Special EditionRollerball | DVD | (24/06/2002) from £9.43   |  Saving you £10.56 (111.98%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Norman Jewison's dystopian Rollerball portrays a near-future in the aftermath of the Corporate Wars, in which nations have crumbled and conglomerates rule. In place of freedom the people are given bread and circuses: material comfort and rollerball itself. Played on a circular, slanted track by men on skates and motorbikes, this extreme sport is the ultimate extrapolation of the primitive blood lust implicit in many team sports. James Caan is outstanding as Jonathan E, star player with the Houston team. In the elegant detachment of Jewison's direction, emphasised by the stark, alienating use of classical music, there are echoes of Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. Notwithstanding the brilliantly staged arena sequences, Rollerball is essentially about freedom versus conformity and the corruption of unfettered capitalism, with Caan leading an existential rebellion in the tradition of Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 which leads to a chilling, apocalyptic finale. Certainly the most prophetic film of the 1970s, Rollerball has an intelligence and power overlooked by those who simply denounce its brutal violence. On the DVD: Rollerball arrives on DVD with clear three-channel Dolby Digital sound, although obviously it lacks the impact of a more modern 5.1 soundtrack. The 1.77:1 transfer is anamorphically enhanced and is generally very sharp and detailed with excellent colour. Some scenes show a lot of grain, but this is presumably a consequence of having to shoot with very fast lenses to capture the swift and dramatic action under indoor lighting conditions. "Return to the Arena--The Making of Rollerball" is a new 25-minute documentary (4:3 with letterboxed film clips) that features Jewison, Harrison and various other personnel reminiscing about the making of the film. The highlight of the extras are commentary tacks from the Jewison and Harrison, and while there is inevitably some overlap of information, and some quite lengthy gaps in Harrison's track, there is also much to interest the serious film buff. Also included is an original seven-minute promotional featurette "From Rome to Rollerball: The Full Circle", the chilling original trailer, the teaser trailer and a trailer for the remake.--Gary S Dalkin

  • Fiddler On The Roof [1971]Fiddler On The Roof | DVD | (01/02/2000) from £6.49   |  Saving you £6.50 (50.00%)   |  RRP £12.99

    This rousing musical, based on the stories of Sholem Aleichem, takes place in pre-revolutionary Russia and centres on the life of Tevye (Topol), a milkman who is trying to keep his family's traditions in place while marrying off his three older daughters. Yet, times are changing and the daughters want to make their own matches, breaking free of many of the constricting customs required of them by Judaism. In the background of these events, Russia is on the brink of revolution and Jews are feeling increasingly unwelcome in their villages. Tevye--who expresses his desire for sameness in the opening number, "Tradition"--is trying to keep everyone, and everything, together. The movie is strongly allegorical--Tevye represents the common man--but it does it dextrously, and the resulting film is a stunning work of art. The music is excellent (it won Oscars for the scoring and the sound), with plenty of familiar songs such as "Sunrise, Sunset" and "If I Were a Rich Man," which you'll be humming long after the movie is over. Isaac Stern's violin--he provides the music for the fiddler on the roof--is hauntingly beautiful. And despite the serious subject matter, the film is quite comedic in parts; it also well deserves the Oscar it won for cinematography. --Jenny Brown

  • Moonstruck [Blu-ray] [1987]Moonstruck | Blu Ray | (13/01/2014) from £8.49   |  Saving you £4.50 (34.60%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Remember the outfit Cher wore to the Oscars when she won an Academy Award for her performance in this 1987 film? Ay-yi-yi. The actress' more retiring character in this infectious comedy leaps several psychological hurdles just giving her hair a permanent. But then the original screenplay of Moonstruck, by John Patrick Shanley (Joe Versus the Volcano), is a wonderful, gently satirical tale of an Italian-American family dealing with repression and dissatisfaction against a backdrop of cultural expectations. Cher is focused and funny as a widow who feels she should marry an older fellow (Danny Aiello), but then falls for his black-sheep brother (Nicolas Cage). Olympia Dukakis and Vincent Gardenia are perfect as her parents, and John Mahoney (of TV's Frasier) has a memorable, small role as a middle-aged man on the make who gets a lecture from Dukakis's character. Shanley's dialogue is comically stylised in a way that makes one appreciate how much words can inform an actor's performance. Taking its cues from him and director Norman Jewison (And Justice for All), the cast immerse themselves in a pool of hilariously operatic emotion. --Tom Keogh

  • Doris DayDoris Day | DVD | (13/03/2006) from £49.95   |  Saving you £0.04 (0.10%)   |  RRP £49.99

    A collection of six classic Doris Day movies in one bumper value box set! Young At Heart (1955) Barney Sloan (Frank Sinatra) is a cynical down-on-his-luck musician who reluctantly agrees to help his composer friend Alex Burke (Gig Young) with a new comedy he is working on. However Barney gains a new perspective on life and love when he meets Alex's irrepressibly perky fiancee Laurie (Doris Day) - and promptly falls in love with her! Lover Come Back (1961) Account ex

  • Sidney Poitier Collection - In The Heat Of The Night/Lilies Of The Field/The Organization/They Call Me Mr Tibbs!Sidney Poitier Collection - In The Heat Of The Night/Lilies Of The Field/The Organization/They Call Me Mr Tibbs! | DVD | (22/01/2007) from £15.48   |  Saving you £1.55 (9.10%)   |  RRP £17.03

    In The Heat Of The Night (Dir. Norman Jewison 1967): The winner of the 1967 Oscar for Best Picture ""In the Heat of the Night"" is set in a small Mississippi town where an unusual murder has been committed. Rod Steiger plays sheriff Bill Gillespie a good lawman despite his racial prejudices. When Virgil Tibbs (Sidney Poitier) a well-dressed African-American and Philadelphia police detective comes to town the two must betray culturally dictated conclusions of the other to grudgingly work together to solve the murder case. Lilies Of The Field (Dir. Ralph Nelson 1963): Homer Smith an itinerant handyman is driving through the Arizona desert when he meets five impoverished nuns. Stopping to fix their leaky farmhouse roof Homer discovers that not only will the Mother Superior not pay him for the job but she also wants him to build their chapel - for free! Hesitant at first Homer soon finds himself single-handedly raising the chapel and the financing. But although he will not receive monetary reward Homer knows that when his work is done he'll leave that dusty desert town a much better place than when he found it. The Organization (Dir. Don Medford 1971): Sidney Poitier reprises his role as Lt. Virgil Tibbs in this taut drama that exposes the ruthless high-stakes world of international drug trafficking. Co-starring Raul Julia this action-packed crime thriller delivers edge-of-the-seat entertainment. Under the cover of darkness six masked figures raid a seemingly respectable furniture factory - and steal a multimillion-dollar cache of heroin! But these are no ordinary crooks. They're a passionate band of former users-turned-vigilantes whose frustration with the law's inability to combat the city's drug problem spurs them to take on a powerful narcotics ring. After contacting Tibbs they confess to the break-in beg him to keep silent and ask for his help. But once he reluctantly agrees to operate outside the law Tibbs soon finds himself at odds with the police and a ruthless drug syndicate that will stop at nothing to silence him! They Call Me Mr. Tibbs (Dir. Gordon Douglas 1970): In this suspenseful sequel to In The Heat Of The Night Sidney Poitier reprises his role as the intrepid investigator who this time must solve a puzzling murder in the City by the Bay. Featuring an original score by Quincy Jones and co-starring Martin Landau and Edward Asner They Call Me Mister Tibbs! is an absorbing mystery that ranks as one of the best. When a prostitute is murdered in San Francisco's ritzy Nob Hill district an anonymous tip implicates minister and political crusader Reverand Logan Sharpe (Landau). Lt. Virgil Tibbs (Poitier) who has known Sharpe for many years asks to be assigned to the case in hopes of clearing his friend's name. So begins the detective's journey through a twisted maze of baffling evidence frantic chases deadly gunfire and bad alibis. Before long Tibbs finds himself bitterly torn between his duty as a cop... and his loyalty to a friend.

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