"Director: Terrence Malick"

  • The Thin Red Line [1999]The Thin Red Line | DVD | (12/06/2000) from £4.09   |  Saving you £15.90 (388.75%)   |  RRP £19.99

    One of the cinema's great disappearing acts came to a close with the release of The Thin Red Line in late 1998. Terrence Malick, the cryptic recluse who withdrew from Hollywood visibility after the release of his visually enthralling masterpiece Days of Heaven (1978), returned to the director's chair after a 20-year coffee break. Malick's comeback vehicle is a fascinating choice: a wide-ranging adaptation of a World War II novel (filmed once before, in 1964) by James Jones. The battle for Guadalcanal Island gives Malick an opportunity to explore nothing less than the nature of life, death, God, and courage. Let that be a warning to anyone expecting a conventional war flick; Malick proves himself quite capable of mounting an exciting action sequence, but he's just as likely to meander into pure philosophical noodling--or simply let the camera contemplate the first steps of a newly born tropical bird or the sinister skulk of a crocodile. This is not especially an actors' movie--some faces go by so quickly they barely register--but the standouts are bold: Nick Nolte as a career-minded colonel, Elias Koteas as a deeply spiritual captain who tries to protect his men, Ben Chaplin as a G.I. haunted by lyrical memories of his wife. The backbone of the film is the ongoing discussion between a wry sergeant (Sean Penn) and an ethereal, almost holy private newcomer (Jim Caviezel). The picture's sprawl may be a result of Malick's method of "finding" a film during shooting and editing, and in some ways The Thin Red Line seems vaguely, intriguingly incomplete. Yet it casts a spell like almost nothing else of its time, and Malick's visionary images are a challenge and a signpost to the rest of his filmmaking generation. --Robert Horton

  • The Thin Red Line [Blu-ray]The Thin Red Line | Blu Ray | (16/05/2011) from £9.99   |  Saving you £10.00 (100.10%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Near the beginning of World War II a squad of American soldiers become close comrades when they encounter fierce Japanese resistance in one of the war's most barbarous battles in Guadalcanal island.

  • The Tree of Life [DVD]The Tree of Life | DVD | (31/10/2011) from £9.71   |  Saving you £10.28 (105.87%)   |  RRP £19.99

    The long front lawns of summer afternoons, the flicker of sunlight as it sprays through tree branches, the volcanic surge of the Earth's interior as the planet heaves itself into being--you certainly can't say Terrence Malick lacks for visual expressiveness. The Tree of Life is Malick's long-cherished project, a film that centres on a family in 1950s Waco, Texas, yet also reaches for cosmic significance in the creation of the universe itself. The Texas memories belong to Jack (Sean Penn), a modern man seemingly ground down by the soulless glass-and-metal corporate world that surrounds him. We learn early in the film of a family loss that happened at a later time, but the flashbacks concern only the dark Eden of Jack's childhood: his games with his two younger brothers, his frustrated, bullying father (Brad Pitt), his one-dimensionally radiant mother (Jessica Chastain). None of which unfolds in anything like a conventional narrative, but in a series of disconnected scenes that conjure, with poetry and specificity, a particular childhood realm. The contributions of cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki and production designer Jack Fisk cannot be underestimated in that regard, and it should be noted that Brad Pitt contributes his best performance: strong yet haunted. And how does the Big Bang material (especially a long, trippy sequence in the film's first hour) tie into this material? Yes, well, the answer to that question will determine whether you find Malick's film a profound exploration of existence or crazy-ambitious failure full of beautiful things. Malick's sincerity is winning (and so is his exceptional touch with the child actors), yet many of the movie's touches are simultaneously gaseous (amongst the bits of whispered narration is the war between nature and grace, roles assigned to mother and father) and all-too-literal (a dinosaur retreats from nearly killing a fellow creature--the first moments of species kindness, or anthropomorphic poppycock?). The Tree of Life premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and won the Palme d'Or there after receiving boos at its press screening. The debate continues, unabated, from that point. --Robert Horton

  • War Collection [DVD]War Collection | DVD | (19/10/2009) from £15.96   |  Saving you £-1.01 (-6.80%)   |  RRP £14.95

    Modern War

  • The Tree of Life [The Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray] [2018]The Tree of Life | Blu Ray | (19/11/2018) from £25.74   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Terrence Malick's magnum opus, a visionary hymn to nature and grace, in an edition featuring a new extended cut. Four decades into an already legendary career, TERRENCE MALICK (Days of Heaven) realized his most rapturous vision to date, tracing a story of childhood, wonder, and grief to the outer limits of time and space. Reaching back to the dawn of creation, Malick sets a story of boyhood memories on a universal scale, charting the coming of age of an awestruck child (newcomer HUNTER MCCRACKEN) in Texas in the 1950s, as he learns to navigate the extremes of nature and grace represented by his bitter, often tyrannical father (Fight Club's BRAD PITT) and his ethereal, nurturing mother (JESSICA CHASTAIN, in her breakout role). Shot with nimble attention to life's most fleeting moments by EMMANUEL LUBEZKI (Gravity), the Palme d'Orwinning The Tree of Life marks the intimately personal, cosmically ambitious culmination of Malick's singular approach to filmmaking. Features: New 4K digital restoration, supervised and approved by director Terrence Malick and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, with 5.1 surround DTSHD Master Audio soundtrack New extended version of the film featuring an additional fifty minutes of footage Exploring The Tree of Life, a 2011 documentary featuring collaborators and admirers of Malick's, including filmmakers David Fincher and Christopher Nolan New interviews with actor Jessica Chastain and visualeffects supervisor Dan Glass Interview from 2011 with composer Alexandre Desplat about the film, and a new interview with music critic Alex Ross about Malick's approach to music Video essay from 2011 by critic Matt Zoller Seitz Trailer PLUS: An essay by critic Kent Jones and a 2011 piece on the film by critic Roger Ebert

  • Badlands [1973]Badlands | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.49   |  Saving you £8.50 (154.83%)   |  RRP £13.99

    Dramatization of the Starkweather-Fugate killing spree of the 1950's, in which a teenage girl and her twenty-something boyfriend slaughtered her entire family and several others in the Dakota badlands.

  • The New World [2005]The New World | DVD | (22/05/2006) from £3.79   |  Saving you £16.20 (81.00%)   |  RRP £19.99

    This epic adventure is set amid the encounter of European and American cultures during the founding of the Jamestown Settlement in 1607.

  • To The Wonder [DVD] [2013]To The Wonder | DVD | (17/06/2013) from £6.99   |  Saving you £11.00 (61.10%)   |  RRP £17.99

    To the Wonder is the beautiful and acclaimed latest offering from Terrence Malick the legendary director of The Tree of Life Badlands and Days of Heaven. The film is centered on Neil (Ben Affleck Argo) a man who is torn between two loves: Marina (Olga Kurylenko Quantum of Solace) the European woman who comes to United States to be with him and Jane (Rachel McAdams Midnight in Paris) the old flame he reconnects with from his hometown. Neil's doubts about his life and loves are reflected in the crisis of faith experienced by Father Quintana (Javier Bardem Skyfall) who only sees pain and the loss of hope in the world. In To the Wonder Malick explores how love and its many phases and seasons - passion sympathy obligation sorrow and indecision - can transform destroy and reinvent lives. Special Features: 'Making Of' Interview with Olga Kurylenko

  • The New World [DVD] [2005]The New World | DVD | (28/09/2009) from £5.99   |  Saving you £5.00 (45.50%)   |  RRP £10.99

    This epic adventure is set amid the encounter of European and American cultures during the founding of the Jamestown Settlement in 1607.

  • Days Of Heaven [1979]Days Of Heaven | DVD | (02/07/2001) from £5.38   |  Saving you £4.61 (46.10%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Originally shown on the big screen in glorious 70 mm, Terrence Malick's Days of Heaven is an aesthetically flawless eye-catching period piece that won its cinematographer, Néstor Almendros, an Oscar. Texture and colour are the unbilled characters in this tragic tale, and are just as important as the players. Richard Gere works in a Chicago steel mill at the turn of the 19th century, but must flee the city after accidentally killing a man. Heading for the wheat fields of Texas, he packs up his girlfriend (Brooke Adams) and his younger sister (Linda Manz). Instead of a better life, they head straight into tragedy when a wealthy farmer (Sam Shepard) falls for Adams. Believing him to be dying and expecting to inherit a fortune, she agrees to marry him. Their plans change when Shepard fails to die and Gere takes matters into his own hands. The story, sadly, fades somewhat when compared to the glory of the visuals. --Rochelle O'Gorman

  • The Tree of Life [Blu-ray]The Tree of Life | Blu Ray | (31/10/2011) from £9.05   |  Saving you £15.94 (176.13%)   |  RRP £24.99

    The long front lawns of summer afternoons, the flicker of sunlight as it sprays through tree branches, the volcanic surge of the Earth's interior as the planet heaves itself into being--you certainly can't say Terrence Malick lacks for visual expressiveness. The Tree of Life is Malick's long-cherished project, a film that centres on a family in 1950s Waco, Texas, yet also reaches for cosmic significance in the creation of the universe itself. The Texas memories belong to Jack (Sean Penn), a modern man seemingly ground down by the soulless glass-and-metal corporate world that surrounds him. We learn early in the film of a family loss that happened at a later time, but the flashbacks concern only the dark Eden of Jack's childhood: his games with his two younger brothers, his frustrated, bullying father (Brad Pitt), his one-dimensionally radiant mother (Jessica Chastain). None of which unfolds in anything like a conventional narrative, but in a series of disconnected scenes that conjure, with poetry and specificity, a particular childhood realm. The contributions of cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki and production designer Jack Fisk cannot be underestimated in that regard, and it should be noted that Brad Pitt contributes his best performance: strong yet haunted. And how does the Big Bang material (especially a long, trippy sequence in the film's first hour) tie into this material? Yes, well, the answer to that question will determine whether you find Malick's film a profound exploration of existence or crazy-ambitious failure full of beautiful things. Malick's sincerity is winning (and so is his exceptional touch with the child actors), yet many of the movie's touches are simultaneously gaseous (amongst the bits of whispered narration is the war between nature and grace, roles assigned to mother and father) and all-too-literal (a dinosaur retreats from nearly killing a fellow creature--the first moments of species kindness, or anthropomorphic poppycock?). The Tree of Life premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and won the Palme d'Or there after receiving boos at its press screening. The debate continues, unabated, from that point. --Robert Horton

  • The New World [Blu-ray] [2005]The New World | Blu Ray | (17/04/2019) from £7.29   |  Saving you £7.70 (51.40%)   |  RRP £14.99

    This epic adventure is set amid the encounter of European and American cultures during the founding of the Jamestown Settlement in 1607.

  • Behind Enemy Lines / Tigerland / Thin Red Line [1998]Behind Enemy Lines / Tigerland / Thin Red Line | DVD | (06/09/2004) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Behind Enemy Lines On a reconnaissance flight over eastern Europe disillusioned naval pilot Chris Burnett (Owen Wilson) and his partner Stackhouse (Gabriel Macht) photograph a scene they were not meant to see. When their plane is shot down and Stackhouse is quickly captured and executed Burnett must struggle to survive in unfamiliar hostile territory with a cold-blooded assassin and hundreds of enemy troops on his heels. Meanwhile on an American battleship in the Adriatic Sea Burnett's commanding officer Admiral Reigart (Gene Hackman) attempts to negotiate his soldier's return amidst tense political and military maneuvers. Soon Burnett discovers exactly why he's being hunted making his situation and Reigert's actions even more perilous... Tigerland Roland Bozz after being conscripted into the US army joins a platoon of other young soldiers preparing to fight in Vietnam. He has no interest in fighting for his country and tries to get sent home as a trouble maker but his superiors mistake his defiance as intelligence and he soon gets a chance to try his hand at leadership... The Thin Red Line A powerful front line cast including Sean Penn Nick Nolte Woody Harrelson and George Clooney explodes into action in this hauntingly realistic view of military and moral chaos in the Pacific during World War II. Nominated for seven Academy Awards including Best Picture and Best Director (Terrence Malick) 'The Thin Red Line' is an unparalleled cinematic masterpiece.

  • Knight of Cups [DVD] [2016]Knight of Cups | DVD | (22/08/2016) from £5.69   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Rick is a screenwriter living in Los Angeles trying to make sense of the strange events around him. While successful in his career, his life feels empty. Haunted by the death of one brother and the dire circumstances of the other, he finds temporary solace in the decadent Hollywood excess that defines his existence. Women provide a distraction to the daily pain he must endure, and every encounter that comes his way brings him closer to finding his place in the world. From Terrence Malick, the visionary director of The Tree of Life and To The Wonder, and starring Academy Award winners* Christian Bale (The Big Short, The Fighter, The Dark Knight Rises), Cate Blanchett (Carol, Blue Jasmine) and Natalie Portman (Black Swan, Thor) comes a stunning meditation on love, fate and fame

  • Song To Song [DVD]Song To Song | DVD | (25/09/2017) from £7.19   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    In this modern love story set against the Austin, Texas music scene, two entangled couples chase success through a rock 'n' roll landscape of seduction and betrayal.

  • Badlands [The Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray]Badlands | Blu Ray | (20/05/2019) from £17.87   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Terrence Malick's exquisite first film, in a new digital restoration. Badlands announced the arrival of a major talent: Terrence Malick. His impressionistic take on the notorious Charles Starkweather killing spree of the late 1950s uses a serialkiller narrative as a springboard for an oblique teenage romance, lovingly and idiosyncratically enacted by Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek. The film introduced many of the elements that would earn Malick his passionate following: the enigmatic approach to narrative and character, the unusual use of voiceover, the juxtaposition of human violence with natural beauty, the poetic investigation of American dreams and nightmares. This debut has spawned countless imitations, but none have equalled its strange sublimity. Bous Features: New, restored 4K digital transfer, approved by director Terrence Malick, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack Making Badlands, a new documentary featuring actors Martin Sheen and Sissy Spacek and art director Jack Fisk New interviews with associate editor Billy Weber and executive producer Edward Pressman Charles Starkweather, a 1993 episode of the television programme American Justice, about the reallife story on which the film was loosely based Trailer PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by filmmaker Michael Almereyda

  • Knight of Cups [Blu-ray] [2016]Knight of Cups | Blu Ray | (22/08/2016) from £7.79   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Rick is a screenwriter living in Los Angeles trying to make sense of the strange events around him. While successful in his career, his life feels empty. Haunted by the death of one brother and the dire circumstances of the other, he finds temporary solace in the decadent Hollywood excess that defines his existence. Women provide a distraction to the daily pain he must endure, and every encounter that comes his way brings him closer to finding his place in the world. From Terrence Malick, the visionary director of The Tree of Life and To The Wonder, and starring Academy Award winners* Christian Bale (The Big Short, The Fighter, The Dark Knight Rises), Cate Blanchett (Carol, Blue Jasmine) and Natalie Portman (Black Swan, Thor) comes a stunning meditation on love, fate and fame.

  • To The Wonder [Blu-ray] [2013]To The Wonder | Blu Ray | (17/06/2013) from £7.79   |  Saving you £15.20 (195.12%)   |  RRP £22.99

    To the Wonder is the beautiful and acclaimed latest offering from Terrence Malick the legendary director of The Tree of Life Badlands and Days of Heaven. The film is centered on Neil (Ben Affleck Argo) a man who is torn between two loves: Marina (Olga Kurylenko Quantum of Solace) the European woman who comes to United States to be with him and Jane (Rachel McAdams Midnight in Paris) the old flame he reconnects with from his hometown. Neil's doubts about his life and loves are reflected in the crisis of faith experienced by Father Quintana (Javier Bardem Skyfall) who only sees pain and the loss of hope in the world. In To the Wonder Malick explores how love and its many phases and seasons - passion sympathy obligation sorrow and indecision - can transform destroy and reinvent lives. Special Features: 'Making Of' Interview with Olga Kurylenko

  • Richard Gere Collection [DVD]Richard Gere Collection | DVD | (09/03/2009) from £24.28   |  Saving you £5.71 (19.00%)   |  RRP £29.99

    Titles Comprise: An Officer And A Gentleman: Richard Gere stars as Navy recruit Zack Mayo while the stunning Debra Winger is his love interest. Lou Gossett Jnr. won an Academy Award for his brilliant portrayal of a tough drill instructor. David Keith plays Zack's struggling fellow candidate. Zack Mayo is a young loner with a bad attitude. Tempted by the glamour and admiration of the life of a Navy pilot he decides to sign up for Officer Candidate School. After thirteen tortuous weeks under Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley (Gossett Jnr.) he slowly begins to learn the importance of discipline love and friendship. Foley warns Zack about the local girls who will do anything to catch themselves a pilot for a husband but despite this Zack finds himself falling in love with Paula (Winger). Days Of Heaven: Terrence Malick's second film is a lyrical visual poem about life in America at the turn of the century. When a Chicago steel-mill worker is fired after a fight with his supervisor he hops aboard a train for the Great Plains with his girlfriend and his younger sister. The trio join itinerant workers following the farming season and find a place with a quiet lonely landowner. As the year passes and the harvest nears a fateful love triangle develops with fiery consequences. The performances match the moody compositions in this elegy for the pre-modern prairie which now stands firmly as one of the most beautiful motion pictures of all time. Internal Affairs: Trust Him... He's A Cop. Dennis Peck knows his way around the law. He can launder money run a scam fix a bad rap. He can even for the right price arrange a murder. Trust me he says I'm a cop. Richard Gere is Peck and Andy Garcia is Raymond Avila the investigator determined to bring Peck to justice in this supercharged police thriller. Peck isn't going down without a fight. The slick cold-blooded manipulator intends to take Avila's career his marriage and even his sanity with him in 'Internal Affairs'. A fine tight script says Gary Franklin (KABC-TV). Two thumbs up! say Siskel & Ebert - Trust them. Intersection: Make every move as if it were your last. Richard Gere portrays Vincent Eastman an award-winning architect whose personal life is on shaky ground. Separated from his beautiful but aloof wife (Sharon Stone) Vincent has an affair with a joyful and passionate writer (Lolita Davidovich) whose love promises a new beginning. But Vincent remains emotionally torn between the two women leaving his future happiness - and that of his thirteen year-old daughter - hanging in the balance. As his relationships start to crumble Vincent hurtles on a collision course toward the one fateful moment when he must confront his true feelings and cross the Intersection. Primal Fear: Arrogant brilliant and successful criminal defense attorney Martin Vail loves a good fight and the media spotlight both of which he knowingly invites when he volunteers to represent a penniless bewildered altar boy accused of murdering the local archbishop. The defendant's guilt seems as evident as the blood found splattered on his clothes. But Vail doesn't concern himself with questions of guilt or innocence. All he cares about is creating and selling his version of the truth. American Gigolo: Julian Kay is on the prowl and looking for someone to please. Boyish and sensual he speaks five or six languages and is equally comfortable as a chauffeur for a wealthy middle-aged matron and as a translator/companion for the lonely wife of an executive. He is the 'American Gigolo'. But Julian's love-for-sale lifestyle turns deadly when a client is murdered and Julian became the prime suspect.

  • The Tree of Life/ The Thin Red Line Double Pack [DVD] [1998]The Tree of Life/ The Thin Red Line Double Pack | DVD | (04/06/2012) from £3.09   |  Saving you £9.90 (320.39%)   |  RRP £12.99

    The Tree of LifeThe long front lawns of summer afternoons, the flicker of sunlight as it sprays through tree branches, the volcanic surge of the Earth's interior as the planet heaves itself into being--you certainly can't say Terrence Malick lacks for visual expressiveness. The Tree of Life is Malick's long-cherished project, a film that centres on a family in 1950s Waco, Texas, yet also reaches for cosmic significance in the creation of the universe itself. The Texas memories belong to Jack (Sean Penn), a modern man seemingly ground down by the soulless glass-and-metal corporate world that surrounds him. We learn early in the film of a family loss that happened at a later time, but the flashbacks concern only the dark Eden of Jack's childhood: his games with his two younger brothers, his frustrated, bullying father (Brad Pitt), his one-dimensionally radiant mother (Jessica Chastain). None of which unfolds in anything like a conventional narrative, but in a series of disconnected scenes that conjure, with poetry and specificity, a particular childhood realm. The contributions of cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki and production designer Jack Fisk cannot be underestimated in that regard, and it should be noted that Brad Pitt contributes his best performance: strong yet haunted. And how does the Big Bang material (especially a long, trippy sequence in the film's first hour) tie into this material? Yes, well, the answer to that question will determine whether you find Malick's film a profound exploration of existence or crazy-ambitious failure full of beautiful things. Malick's sincerity is winning (and so is his exceptional touch with the child actors), yet many of the movie's touches are simultaneously gaseous (amongst the bits of whispered narration is the war between nature and grace, roles assigned to mother and father) and all-too-literal (a dinosaur retreats from nearly killing a fellow creature--the first moments of species kindness, or anthropomorphic poppycock?). The Tree of Life premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and won the Palme d'Or there after receiving boos at its press screening. The debate continues, unabated, from that point. --Robert Horton The Thin Red LineOne of the cinema's great disappearing acts came to a close with the release of The Thin Red Line in late 1998. Terrence Malick, the cryptic recluse who withdrew from Hollywood visibility after the release of his visually enthralling masterpiece Days of Heaven (1978), returned to the director's chair after a 20-year coffee break. Malick's comeback vehicle is a fascinating choice: a wide-ranging adaptation of a World War II novel (filmed once before, in 1964) by James Jones. The battle for Guadalcanal Island gives Malick an opportunity to explore nothing less than the nature of life, death, God, and courage. Let that be a warning to anyone expecting a conventional war flick; Malick proves himself quite capable of mounting an exciting action sequence, but he's just as likely to meander into pure philosophical noodling--or simply let the camera contemplate the first steps of a newly born tropical bird or the sinister skulk of a crocodile. This is not especially an actors' movie--some faces go by so quickly they barely register--but the standouts are bold: Nick Nolte as a career-minded colonel, Elias Koteas as a deeply spiritual captain who tries to protect his men, Ben Chaplin as a G.I. haunted by lyrical memories of his wife. The backbone of the film is the ongoing discussion between a wry sergeant (Sean Penn) and an ethereal, almost holy private newcomer (Jim Caviezel). The picture's sprawl may be a result of Malick's method of "finding" a film during shooting and editing, and in some ways The Thin Red Line seems vaguely, intriguingly incomplete. Yet it casts a spell like almost nothing else of its time, and Malick's visionary images are a challenge and a signpost to the rest of his filmmaking generation. --Robert Horton

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