Amarcord DVD

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Amarcord (or 'I Remember' in local dialect) was conceived as a tribute to Fellini's childhood upbringing in the Italian resort town of Rimini. He captures a year in the life of a provincial seaside town in the 1930s through a series of nostalgic vignettes which reflect the bizarre mixture of characters and events that the town attracts: loopy teachers strange foreigners curvaceous women a skinny nymphomaniac and a crazed solitary motorcyclist hilarious family rows a wedding and a

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Released
17 April 2019
Directors
Actors
Format
DVD 
Publisher
Warner Home Video 
Classification
Runtime
118 minutes 
Features
PAL, Subtitled, Widescreen 
Barcode
7321900322805 
  • Average Rating for Amarcord [1973] - 4 out of 5


    (based on 1 user reviews)
  • Amarcord [1973]
    Edward Howard

    Fellini's Amarcord is a late masterpiece from this director who excelled at translating the figments of his imagination onto the screen. Nowhere is that more apparent than here, in which the entire film is a loosely connected series of vignettes presenting an extremely exaggerated, phantasmagoric image of Fellini's memories of his childhood home town of Rimini. This is a continuation of the kind of circus atmosphere that proliferated throughout 8 1/2, except in that case the circus revolved around one central figure, the frustrated director played by Marcello Mastroianni. Here, there is no such central character; the town itself is the main character. The story, such as it is, is just the passing of a year in the town's life, following the change of the season and relating anecdotes about many of the residents. The film both opens and closes with the swirling of the "lemone," the yellow wisps which for this town signal the end of winter and the onset of spring. In between, all sorts of things happen, and things change, but there's not a real sense of narrative; it's all just part of the fabric of the town's life.

    Even more so than in any of his earlier films, everything here is subsumed by the swirling circus atmosphere, with Nino Rota's bouncy score driving along scenes of chaotic celebration and angry arguments alike. Even a ritualistic fascist rally, complete with a giant Mussolini head made of flowers, is filmed with the same over-the-top energy and vitality, demonstrating how easily the townspeople's vibrant personalities could be absorbed by the Mussolini machine. The fascists provide an ugly underbelly to the film as a whole, especially in a chillingly underplayed scene in which they force a local socialist-sympathizer to drink castor oil, a common punishment doled out by Italian fascists. Their malevolent presence in the town is an occasional chill wind through the otherwise pristine village of Fellini's reminiscences. In many ways, this is a true Fellini primer. All of his sexual obsessions are on display here, exaggerated to mammoth proportions. There's Volpina, the ridiculously over-acted local tramp who seems to exude animal sexuality from her every moment. There's also the wonderfully hilarious scene in which the young boy Titta receives his sexual initiation with the buxom grocery store woman, who bares her massive breasts for him. For Fellini, childhood is a garbled mix of sexual obsessions, school pranks, eccentric grown-ups looming large, and the occasional numbing censure of religion or discipline-minded adults. His gift is transforming the hazy, time-distorted memory of these things into a sublime, ecstatic celebration of all the little moments of life, transformed by reminiscence into events of epic importance.

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Fellini's Oscar-winning homage to his home town of Rimini remains his most popular film. An ensemble drama with notes of both comedy and tragedy - as well as a piquant infusion of the politics of the era (the 1930s, which saw the emergence of fascism) - the film captures a year in the life of the Mediterranean seaside town through a series of nostalgic anecdotal vignettes of a fantastic array of events and characters, all tenderly shot in soft, muted colours. Loopy teachers, strange foreigners, curvaceous women, a skinny nymphomaniac and a crazed solitary motorcyclist are just a few of the bizzare, but very human, characters whom Fellini depicts experiencing the wonder and disillusionment of their everyday lives.

Please note this is a region 2 DVD and will require a region 2 (Europe) or region Free DVD Player in order to play Amarcord (or &39;I Remember&39; in local dialect) was conceived as a tribute to Fellini&39;s childhood upbringing in the Italian resort town of Rimini He captures a year in the life of a provincial seaside town in the 1930s through a series of nostalgic vignettes which reflect the bizarre mixture of characters and events that the town attracts loopy teachers strange foreigners curvaceous women a skinny nymphomaniac and a crazed solitary motorcyclist hilarious family rows a wedding and a funeral Veering from delicate and painful emotions - the poignant mortality of the dying mother playing with her wedding ring now loose on her wasted finger as her husband strains to keep his composure - to scenes of hilarity as schoolboys play pranks on their teacher Fellini&39;s Amarcord covers life in all its forms comedy and tragedy wonder and disillusionment Winner of the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film in 1974 Actors Bruno Zanin Magali Noel Gianfilippo Carcano Pupella Maggio & Armando BranciaDirector Federico FelliniCertificate 15 years and overYear 1973Screen Widescreen 1851 AnamorphicLanguages ItalianSubtitles EnglishDuration 2 hours (approx)Region Region 2 - Will only play on European Region 2 or multi-region DVD players