Children Of Men (2-disc Special Edition) DVD

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In a world fallen into anarchy a disillusioned bureaucrat becomes the unlikely champion of Earth's survival.

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Released
19 March 2007
Directors
Actors
Format
DVD 
Publisher
Universal Pictures UK 
Classification
Runtime
107 minutes 
Features
Anamorphic, Box set, PAL 
Barcode
5050582492491 
  • Average Rating for Children Of Men (2-disc Special Edition) [2006] - 3 out of 5


    (based on 1 user reviews)
  • Children Of Men (2-disc Special Edition) [2006]
    Kashif Ahmed

    Some movies tend to go on when they ought to stop, but 'Children Of Men' (here in its second incarnation as a 2-disc Special Edition) is one film that could have been longer; seeing as it seeks to address such weighty issues as infertility, oppression and that terrible, yet depressingly familiar, trinity of 'isms': fascism, racism and state-terrorism.

    Its lean 97-minute running time, punctuated by some spectacular action sequences, leads me to suspect that director Alfonso Cuarón didn't find P.D. James's novel as illuminating or adaptable as he may've initially thought. Cuarón focuses on the book's 'Alpha' chapters, wisely updating the narrative; he sets his story in 2027 in an England plagued by infertility & totalitarianism, seen through the eyes of disillusioned Londoner and erstwhile political activist; Theo (Clive Owen). Initially the quintessential anti-hero, Theo (a not so subtle nod to God) navigates his way through a sinister world of shaky alliances and ulterior motives; a place where violence (quick & unsettlingly realistic) can strike anyone anywhere thus creating an atmosphere in which every character, no matter how important, is at risk of being killed off. Clive Owens's measured monotone and deadpan delivery, though not as well suited to this role as it was to his character in 'Inside Man, still works surprisingly well, particularly in the film's few scenes of humour: "My mum had a plastic one in the bathroom..." he remarks upon coming face-to-face with Michelangelo's 'David' "...it was a lamp".

    'Children Of Men' is, on many levels, a masterpiece; though its reluctance to fully engage with the issues it raises makes it look as if it's pulling its punches or using an elliptical narrative where clarity and directness is required. I quite like Alfonso Cuarón, and loved his much maligned take on 'Great Expectations' but I was watching 'Sólo Con Tu Pareja' the other day, and realised that he's far too breezy a director to handle the kind of themes at work in 'Children Of Men'. A film of such significance and magnitude requires the kind of auteur Hollywood rarely, if ever, supports anymore; and its because of this that 'V: For Vendetta' remains unchallenged as the best film about Big Government gone mad in Blighty. 'Children Of Men' is still better than most and boasts some fine performances from Clive Owen, Julianne Moore, Michael Caine, Pam Ferris an hilarious cameo by Ken Loach regular Peter Mullan and an exceptionally powerful, complex turn by Chiwetel Ejiofor. Extras on this 2-disc set include a short making of, three deleted scenes, a few words from bumbling celebrity philosopher Slavoj Zizek and a roundtable discussion where some pretentious, stuffed shit boffins sound as if they've been paid to plug Malthusian theory. 'Children Of Men' definitely deserves to be seen, but here's hoping for an extended director's cut sometime in the future.

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Please note this is a region 2 DVD and will require a region 2 (Europe) or region Free DVD Player in order to play. Futuristic sci-fi drama about a world in which humans have almost completely lost the ability to procreate and the search for any remaining specimen that can. It's the year 2027 and earth's youngest human being, at 18, has just died. Extinction seems a certainty, aided by the fact that wars are now waged continually between desperate nationalistic factions. Set against the backdrop of London, Clive Owen plays Theo, a former activist now bureaucrat informed of the discovery a lone pregnant woman - ostensibly earth's last hope. The challenge is to deliver her from harm to a place where her baby can be delivered safely. Understandably, there is more than one of the warring factions that would benefit from getting their hands on her. Rated: Suitable for 15 years and over

Futuristic sci-fi drama about a world in which humans have almost completely lost the ability to procreate and the search for any remaining specimen that can. It's the year 2027 and earth's youngest human being, at 18, has just died. Extinction seems a certainty, aided by the fact that wars are now waged continually between desperate nationalistic factions. Set against the backdrop of London, Clive Owen plays Theo, a former activist now bureaucrat informed of the discovery a lone pregnant woman - ostensibly earth's last hope. The challenge is to deliver her from harm to a place where her baby can be delivered safely. Understandably, there is more than one of the warring factions that would benefit from getting their hands on her.