Evening DVD

| DVD

A dying woman remembers her romantic past while her daughters face their emotional present.

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Released
18 February 2008
Directors
Actors
Format
DVD 
Publisher
Icon Home Entertainment 
Classification
Runtime
114 minutes 
Features
PAL 
Barcode
5051429101286 
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Michael Cunningham (author of THE HOURS) lends his screenwriting skills to Lajos Koltai&39;s EVENING This time Cunningham adapts a book by Susan Minot for the big screen Vanessa Redgrave plays Ann Grant who in her last hours retells the highlights of her life to an audience made up of her daughters with Claire Danes playing a younger version of the protagonist

Drama based on the novel by Susan Minot. Overcome by the power of memory, Ann Lord (Vanessa Redgrave) reveals a long-held secret to her concerned daughters; Constance (Natasha Richardson), a content wife and mother, and Nina (Toni Collette), a restless single woman. Both are bedside when Ann calls out for the man she loved more than any other, Harris (Patrick Wilson). While Constance and Nina try to take stock of Ann's life and their own lives, their mother is tended to by a night nurse (Eileen Atkins) as she journeys in her mind back to a summer weekend some 50 years ago, when she was Ann Grant (Claire Danes). As she reflects on a beautiful and life-changing weekend with the one true love of her life, her daughters come to their own understanding about the power of the past and the unbreakable bonds between mothers and daughters, family, and the loves of their lives.

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