West 11 DVD

| DVD

An early feature from Michael Winner, this brilliantly gritty crime thriller sets its story of alienation and amorality amid the faded grandeur and seedy clubs of early-sixties Notting Hill. Alfred Lynch leads an excellent cast, and the film showcases an outstandingly vulnerable performance from Diana Dors. Scripted by Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall, West 11 is presented here in a brand-new transfer from the original film elements, in its as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio.Joe Beckett, seasoned citizen of the bedsitter belt, aged about 22, is the renegade son of... modest, respectable parents and, to use his own description, 'an emotional leper'. He decides that he needs a violent shock to shake him back into life, and as a result accepts a commission to carry out the murder of a total stranger for a man he meets in a coffee bar...SPECIAL FEATURE:Original theatrical trailer Alternative scenes made for the overseas market [show more]

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Released
02 March 2015
Directors
Actors
Format
DVD 
Publisher
Network 
Classification
Runtime
89 minutes 
Features
PAL 
Barcode
5027626426040 
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Michael Winner directs this classic British crime thriller starring Alfred Lynch. Set in Notting Hill during the 1960s, the film follows Joe Becket (Lynch), an unemployed and emotionally cold young man living in a bedsit who frequents the area's jazz clubs and coffee bars. When Beckett is approached by a war veteran offering him the chance to earn some money by murdering his wealthy aunt, Beckett sees it as an opportunity to get rich quick. But can Beckett really handle the ensuing guilt that follows such a heinous crime?