"Actor: John Heard"

  • Big [1988]Big | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.38   |  Saving you £7.61 (141.45%)   |  RRP £12.99

    A perfect marriage of novel but incisive writing, acting and direction, Big is the story of a 12-year-old boy who wishes he were older, and wakes up one morning as a30-year-old man (Tom Hanks). The script by Gary Ross(Dave) and Anne Spielberg finds some unexpected ways of attacking obvious issues of sex, work, and childhood friendships, and in all of these things the accent is on classy humour and great sensitivity. Hanks is remarkable in the lead, at times hilarious (reacting to caviar just as a 12-year-old would) and at others deeply tender. Penny Marshall became a first-rate filmmaker with this 1988 work. --Tom Keogh

  • Home Alone / Home Alone 2: Lost in New York Double Pack [DVD] [1990]Home Alone / Home Alone 2: Lost in New York Double Pack | DVD | (28/01/2013) from £6.99   |  Saving you £-2.00 (N/A%)   |  RRP £4.99

    Home Alone: Eight-year-old Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) has become the man of the house, overnight! Accidentally left behind when his family rushes off on a Christmas vacation, Kevin gets busy decorating the house for the holidays. But he's not decking the halls with tinsel and holly. Two bumbling burglars are trying to break in, and Kevin's rigging a bewildering battery of booby traps to welcome them! Home Alone 2 - Lost In New York: Kevin McCalliste...

  • Beaches [1988]Beaches | DVD | (05/05/2003) from £3.99   |  Saving you £11.00 (275.69%)   |  RRP £14.99

    Director Garry Marshall's 1988 drama Beaches about the 30-year friendship between two women, one wealthy (Barbara Hershey) and the other (Bette Midler) seeking her fortune in show business, is well written (based on the novel by Iris Rainer Dart) and nicely textured in its contrast between the characters' separate destinies. When Hershey becomes ill with cancer, the film takes a predictably sentimental course, yet Marshall brings out the best in both actresses and catches some very fine drama. Beaches is a little too long, perhaps, but overall it is a fine experience. --Tom Keogh

  • White ChicksWhite Chicks | DVD | (28/02/2005) from £3.00   |  Saving you £16.99 (566.33%)   |  RRP £19.99

    US funny men Shawn and Marlon Wayans star as two unlucky FBI agents who decide cross-dressing is the way to further their investigation.

  • Battlestar Galactica: Season 2Battlestar Galactica: Season 2 | DVD | (28/08/2006) from £9.25   |  Saving you £40.74 (81.50%)   |  RRP £49.99

    ""47 875 survivors in search of a home called Earth."" ""The cylons were created by man. They evolved. They rebelled. There are many copies. And they have a plan."" The Sci-fi Channel's hottest TV series returns as Battlestar Galactica 2.0 blasts onto DVD. As the epic second season begins the fight to save humanity rages on - even as civil war looms within the fleet between the followers of President Roslin and Commander Adama. Relive all the intensity and exciteme

  • The Sopranos: Complete Series 1 [1999]The Sopranos: Complete Series 1 | DVD | (24/11/2003) from £13.09   |  Saving you £48.90 (373.57%)   |  RRP £61.99

    Writer-producer-director David Chase's extraordinary television seriesThe Sopranos is nominally an urban gangster drama, but its true impact strikes closer to home. This ambitious TV series chronicles a dysfunctional, suburban American family in bold relief. And for protagonist Tony Soprano, there's the added complexity posed by heading twin families, his collegiate mob clan and his own nouveau-riche brood. The brilliant first series is built around what Tony learns when, whipsawed between those two worlds, he finds himself plunged into depression and seeks psychotherapy--a gesture at odds with his midlevel capo's machismo, yet instantly recognisable as a modern emotional test. With analysis built into the very spine of the show's elaborate episodic structure, creator Chase and his formidable corps of directors, writers and actors weave an unpredictable series of parallel and intersecting plot arcs that twist from tragedy to farce to social realism. While creating for a smaller screen, they enjoy a far larger canvas than a single movie would afford and the results, like the very best episodic television, attain a richness and scope far closer to a novel than movies normally get. Unlike Francis Coppola's operatic dramatisation of Mario Puzo's Godfather epic, The Sopranos sustains a poignant, even mundane intimacy in its focus on Tony, brought to vivid life by James Gandolfini's mercurial performance. Alternately seductive, exasperated, fearful and murderous, Gandolfini is utterly convincing even when executing brutal shifts between domestic comedy and dramatic violence. Both he and the superb team of Italian-American actors recruited as his loyal (and, sometimes, not-so-loyal) henchman and their various "associates" make this mob as credible as the evocative Bronx and New Jersey locations where the episodes were filmed. The first year's other life force is Livia Soprano, Tony's monstrous, meddlesome mother. As Livia, the late Nancy Marchand eclipses her long career of patrician performances to create an indelibly earthy, calculating matriarch who shakes up both families; Livia also serves as foil and rival to Tony's loyal, usually level-headed wife, Carmela (Edie Falco). Lorraine Bracco makes Tony's therapist, Dr Melfi, a convincing confidante, by turns "professional", perceptive and sexy; the duo's therapeutic relationship is also depicted with uncommon accuracy. Such grace notes only enrich what's not merely an aesthetic high point for commercial television, but an absorbing film masterwork that deepens with subsequent screenings. --Sam Sutherland

  • Home Alone [1990]Home Alone | DVD | (06/11/2006) from £4.89   |  Saving you £1.10 (18.40%)   |  RRP £5.99

    Eight-year-old Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) has become the man of the house overnight! Accidentally left behind when his family rushes off on a Christmas vacation Kevin gets busy decorating the house for the holidays. But he's not decking the halls with tinsel and holly. Two bumbling burglars are trying to break in and Kevin's rigging a bewildering battery of booby traps to welcome them! Written and produced by John Hughes this madcap slapstick adventure features an all-star supporting cast including Catherine O'Hara and John Heard as Kevin's parents Joe Pesci and Daniel Stem as the burglars and John Candy as the ""Polka King of the Midwest.""

  • Home Alone [1990]Home Alone | DVD | (27/11/2000) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Eight-year-old Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) has become the man of the house overnight! Accidentally left behind when his family rushes off on a Christmas vacation Kevin gets busy decorating the house for the holidays. But he's not decking the halls with tinsel and holly. Two bumbling burglars are trying to break in and Kevin's rigging a bewildering battery of booby traps to welcome them! Written and produced by John Hughes this madcap slapstick adventure features an all-star supporting cast including Catherine O'Hara and John Heard as Kevin's parents Joe Pesci and Daniel Stem as the burglars and John Candy as the Polka King of the Midwest.

  • The Pelican Brief [1994]The Pelican Brief | DVD | (25/09/1998) from £3.99   |  Saving you £10.00 (250.63%)   |  RRP £13.99

    Another John Grisham legal thriller comes to the screen, pairing Denzel Washington and Julia Roberts in a film directed by Alan J Pakula, who is known for dark-hued suspense pictures such as Klute, The Parallax View, All the President's Men, and Presumed Innocent. The Pelican Brief isn't up to the level of those films, but it is a perfectly entertaining movie about a law student (Roberts) whose life is endangered when she discovers evidence of a conspiracy behind the killings of two Supreme Court justices. She enlists the help of an investigative reporter (Washington) and the two become fugitives. The charisma and chemistry of the leads goes a long way toward compensating for the story's shortcomings, as does a truly impressive supporting cast that includes Sam Shepard, John Heard, James B Sikking, Tony Goldwyn, Stanley Tucci, Hume Cronyn, John Lithgow, William Atherton and Robert Culp. --Jim Emerson

  • The Sopranos: Complete Series 1 (Six Disc Set) [1999]The Sopranos: Complete Series 1 (Six Disc Set) | DVD | (29/10/2000) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £61.99

    The Sopranos, writer-producer-director David Chase's extraordinary television series, is nominally an urban gangster drama, but its true impact strikes closer to home: This ambitious TV series chronicles a dysfunctional, suburban American family in bold relief. And for protagonist Tony Soprano, there's the added complexity posed by heading twin families, his collegial mob clan and his own nouveau riche brood. The series' brilliant first season is built around what Tony learns when, whipsawed between those two worlds, he finds himself plunged into depression and seeks psychotherapy--a gesture at odds with his midlevel capo's machismo, yet instantly recognisable as a modern emotional test. With analysis built into the very spine of the show's elaborate episodic structure, creator Chase and his formidable corps of directors, writers, and actors weave an unpredictable series of parallel and intersecting plot arcs that twist from tragedy to farce to social realism. While creating for a smaller screen, they enjoy a far larger canvas than a single movie would afford, and the results, like the very best episodic television, attain a richness and scope far closer to a novel than movies normally get. Unlike Francis Coppola's operatic dramatisation of Mario Puzo's Godfather epic, The Sopranos sustains a poignant, even mundane intimacy in its focus on Tony, brought to vivid life by James Gandolfini's mercurial performance. Alternately seductive, exasperated, fearful, and murderous, Gandolfini is utterly convincing even when executing brutal shifts between domestic comedy and dramatic violence. Both he and the superb team of Italian-American actors recruited as his loyal (and, sometimes, not-so-loyal) henchman and their various "associates" make this mob as credible as the evocative Bronx and New Jersey locations where the episodes were filmed. The first season's other life force is Livia Soprano, Tony's monstrous, meddlesome mother. As Livia, the late Nancy Marchand eclipses her long career of patrician performances to create an indelibly earthy, calculating matriarch who shakes up both families; Livia also serves as foil and rival to Tony's loyal, usually level-headed wife, Carmela (Edie Falco). Lorraine Bracco makes Tony's therapist, Dr Melfi, a convincing confidante, by turns "professional", perceptive, and sexy; the duo's therapeutic relationship is also depicted with uncommon accuracy. Such grace notes only enrich what's not merely an aesthetic high point for commercial television, but an absorbing film masterwork that deepens with subsequent screenings. --Sam Sutherland, Amazon.com

  • The Rum Diary [DVD]The Rum Diary | DVD | (05/03/2012) from £2.99   |  Saving you £17.00 (568.56%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Actor-producer Johnny Depp pays homage to his friend Hunter S. Thompson through this sprightly adaptation of the novelist's semi-autobiographical novel. Depp plays Paul Kemp, the booze-sozzled journalist who takes centre stage in Bruce Robinson's period comedy. Out of desperation, the New Yorker takes a job with a San Juan newspaper in 1960, where he reports to the cynical Lotterman (Richard Jenkins) and shares a squalid flat with laid-back photographer Sala (The Sopranos' Michael Rispoli) and the truly unhinged "crime and religion" reporter Moburg (a scene-stealing Giovanni Ribisi). The three Ugly Americans do their best to drain the island's rum supply until Kemp meets Aaron Eckhart's slick Sanderson, who recruits the writer to promote his real estate ventures, regardless as to the number of poverty-stricken Puerto Ricans his hotels will displace. Politically, Kemp leans left, but he needs the dough, so he accepts the offer, only to find the ultimate temptation in Sanderson's uninhibited fiancée, Chenault (the stunning Amber Heard). It's a tricky balancing act, but when the natives start getting restless, Kemp risks losing everything. If the conclusion feels anticlimactic, Robinson keeps the antic energy going through nerve-wracking car chases, balletic cock fights, and a hilarious acid excursion that recalls the hotel trip-out in Terry Gilliam's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, to which Robinson's film serves as a less surrealistic cousin. If it isn't as certain to become a cult classic, like the director's equally inebriated Withnail and I, Depp and company always remain true to Thompson's irascible spirit. --Kathleen C. Fennessy

  • Cat People - Collectors Edition [Blu-ray]Cat People - Collectors Edition | Blu Ray | (25/05/2015) from £12.29   |  Saving you £3.70 (30.11%)   |  RRP £15.99

    Paul Schrader, the director of American Gigolo, brought a similar kind of sexual chic to this explicit horror movie. A remake of the beautiful, haunting 1942 Cat People, this version takes off from the same idea: that a woman (Nastassja Kinski), a member of a race of feline humans, will revert to her animalistic self when she has sex. Arriving to meet her brother (Malcolm McDowell) in New Orleans, she finds herself disturbed by his sexual presence. A zoo curator (John Heard) becomes fascinated by her, but he will discover that her kittenish ways are just the tip of the claw. Schrader dresses the story up in a stylish, glossy production, keyed on Kinski's green-eyed, thick-lipped beauty; it's hard to think of another actress in 1982 who could so immediately suggest a cat walking on two legs. Luckily Kinski had a European attitude toward her body, because this film has plenty of poster-art nudity. There's also lots of gore and some wacky flashbacks to the ancient tribe of cat people, who hold rituals in an orange desert while Giorgio Moroder's music plays. Cat People doesn't really make all this come together, but it's always interesting to look at, and the dreadful mood lingers. --Robert Horton

  • Animal Factory [2003]Animal Factory | DVD | (26/04/2004) from £6.38   |  Saving you £9.61 (60.10%)   |  RRP £15.99

    Poignant prison drama following 21-year-old Ron Deckeras he enters a Pennsylvania state penitentiary. Protected by prison vet Earl Copen, the pair plan an escape which will either set them free or cost them their lives in the process.

  • Big [Blu-ray]Big | Blu Ray | (17/04/2019) from £4.79   |  Saving you £11.20 (233.82%)   |  RRP £15.99

    12-year-old Josh wishes he was 'big' and wakes up to find that overnight he has developed into an adult male (Tom Hanks). Kicked out of home by his mother, who doesn't believe his story, man-child Josh quickly gets a job developing new ideas for toys, with much success. He also finds himself successful with women - something he isn't quite ready to handle!

  • Justice League the New Frontie [DVD] [2017]Justice League the New Frontie | DVD | (30/10/2017) from £6.45   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Feature-length animation following the adventures of the DC Comics characters. Based on the limited series 'The New Frontier' by Darwyn Cooke, the film chronicles the origins of the Justice League in the 1950s as they unite for the first time to take on a mysterious entity, known as the Centre, which has emerged and is seeking to destroy human civilization. Can Superman (voice of Kyle MacLachlan), Batman (Jeremy Sisto), Wonder Woman (Lucy Lawless), Flash (Neil Patrick Harris), Green Lantern (David Boreanaz) and John Jones (Miguel Ferrer) save the planet before it's too late?

  • Home Alone Collection [DVD]Home Alone Collection | DVD | (06/11/2006) from £8.49   |  Saving you £1.23 (12.70%)   |  RRP £9.72

    Home Alone: Eight-year-old Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) has become the man of the house overnight! Accidentally left behind when his family rushes off on a Christmas vacation Kevin gets busy decorating the house for the holidays. But he's not decking the halls with tinsel and holly. Two bumbling burglars are trying to break in and Kevin's rigging a bewildering battery of booby traps to welcome them! Home Alone 2 - Lost In New York: Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) is back. But this time he's in New York City - with enough cash and credit cards to turn the Big Apple into his own playground! But Kevin won't be alone for long. The notorious Wet Bandits Harry and Marv (Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern) still smarting from their last encounter with Kevin are bound for New York too plotting a huge holiday heist. Home Alone 3: International crooks hide a top-secret computer chip inside a toy car but an airport mix-up lands it in the hands of eight-year-old Alex Pruitt who's home alone with the chicken pox. Madness and mayhem kick into high gear as the pint-sized hero defends his house against the bumbling bad guys armed with an outrageous array of ambushes and booby traps. Home Alone 4: Kevin McCallister's parents have split up. Now living with his mom he decides to spend Christmas with his dad at the mansion of his father's rich girlfriend Natalie. Meanwhile robber Marv Merchants partners up with a new criminal to hit Natalie's mansion with only Kevin left inside to fend them off in any devious and destructive way he can!

  • Deceived [1992]Deceived | DVD | (12/02/2001) from £4.69   |  Saving you £10.30 (68.70%)   |  RRP £14.99

    In her fist dramatic role screen superstar Goldie Hawn gives a critically acclaimed performance as Adrienne Saunders a woman whose perfect life as a wife and mother disintegrates into a waking nightmare of betrayal and deception. Adriennes's world begins to unravel when her husband Jack (John Heard Home Alone; Awakenings) is apparently killed in a freak car accident After his mysterious death she discovers the shocking truths about the man she loved and chilling evidence of mu

  • Snake Eyes [1998]Snake Eyes | DVD | (05/02/2001) from £3.79   |  Saving you £12.20 (321.90%)   |  RRP £15.99

    Brian De Palma's 1998 thriller is largely an exercise in airing out his orchestral, oversized visual style (think of his Blowout, Body Double or Raising Cain) for the heck of it. The far-fetched story featuresNicolasCage as a crooked police detective attending a championship boxing match at which the Secretary of Defence is assassinated. The unfortunate Secretary's right-hand man (Gary Sinise) happens to be Cage's old friend, a fact that complicates the cop's efforts to reconstruct the crime from conflicting accounts--a directorial strategy bearing similarities to Kurosawa's Rashomon. The outrageousness of the scenario essentially gives DePalma permission to construct a baroque cathedral of spectacular camera stunts, which (he well knows) are inevitably more interesting than the hoary conspiracy plot. (The opening scene alone, which runs on for a number of minutes and consists of one, unbroken shot that moves in from the street, following Cage up and down stairs and in and out of rooms until finally ending ringside at the match, is breathtaking.) The shifting points of view--based on the contradictory statements of witnesses--also give De Palma licence to get creative with camera angles and scene rearrangements. The script bogs down in the third act but De Palma is just revving up for a big, operatic finish that is absolutely gratuitous but undeniably impressive. Yes, it's style over substance in Snake Eyes but what style you're talking about.--Tom Keogh

  • Betrayed (1988) [Blu-ray]Betrayed (1988) | Blu Ray | (02/12/2019) from £7.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    After a Jewish radio host is murdered, BFI agent Cathy Weaver (Debra Winger) is sent undercover to infiltrate a close-knit farming community believed to be harbouring the men responsible. She soon meets and falls for local farmer Gary Simmons (Tom Berenger) a well-respected Vietnam veteran, but it's not long before her suspicions are aroused. Realising that Simmons is leading a double-life as the leader of a white supremacist group, responsible for a series of brutal crimes, Agent Weaver must decide where her loyalties lie, with the man she loves or the country she swore to protect. Directed by Costa-Gavras (Missing) and written by Joe Eszterhas (Basic Instinct, Jagged Edge), Betrayed is an edge-of-your-seat thriller with an excellent supporting cast including John Heard, John Mahoney and Betsy Blair. Special Features: Presented in High Definition Guardian Interview with Costa-Gavras (1984, 86 mins, audio only): the Oscar winning director discusses his career in this interview recorded four years before the release of Betrayed Interview with Joe Eszterhas (2013, 100 mins, audio only): recorded at The London Screenwriters Festival, the incomparable writer of Betrayed and Basic Instinct is interviewed by filmmaker and author Chris Jones and also fields questions from the audience Interview with William Bradford Huie (1968, 28 mins): the journalist, author and civil rights activist is interviewed by Bernard Braden for his never broadcast series Now and Then Original Theatrical Trailer **FIRST PRESSING ONLY** Fully illustrated booklet with new essays by screenwriter Joe Ezsterhas and film critic Jessica Kiang Other extras TBC

  • Home Alone [Blu-ray]Home Alone | Blu Ray | (08/11/2010) from £9.05   |  Saving you £10.94 (120.88%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Now and forever a favourite among kids, this 1990 comedy written by John Hughes (The Breakfast Club) and directed by Chris Columbus (Mrs. Doubtfire) ushered Macaulay Culkin onto the screen as a troubled 8-year-old who doesn't comfortably mesh with his large family. He's forced to grow a little after being accidentally left behind when his folks and siblings fly off to Paris. A good-looking boy, Culkin lights up the screen during several funny sequences, the most famous of which finds him screaming for joy when he realises he's unsupervised in his own house. A bit wooden with dialogue, the then-little star's voice could grate on the nerves (especially in long, wise-child passages of pure bromide), but he unquestionably carries Home Alone. Billie Bird and John Candy show up as two of the interesting strangers Culkin's character meets. Joe Pesci and Daniel Stern are entertainingly cartoonish as thieves, but the ensuing violence once the little hero decides to keep them out of his house is over-the-top. --Tom Keogh

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