"Actor: Nancy Allen"

  • Robocop Limited Edition [Blu-ray]Robocop Limited Edition | Blu Ray | (25/11/2019) from £27.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    PART MAN, PART MACHINE, ALL COP. RoboCop, from Orion Pictures, marked director Paul Verhoeven's (Flesh + Blood) Hollywood debut and instantly became an enduring sci-fi/action classic when it landed in theatres in the summer of 1987. Verhoeven's peerlessly exciting and kinetic visuals were matched by a sharp script, iconic cast and exceptional special effects by Rob Bottin (The Thing) and Phil Tippett (The Empire Strikes Back). The film takes place in Detroit in the not-too-distant future. Heroic cop Alex Murphy (Peter Weller, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai) is gunned down in the line of duty, only to be resurrected as RoboCop a cybernetic mix of spare human parts and Motor City steel, and the latest defense against crime designed by the all-powerful OCP Corporation. As RoboCop's memories of his former life as Murphy resurface, only his ex-partner (Nancy Allen, Dressed To Kill) stands beside him to fight against the vicious thugs responsible for his death, as well as a nefarious top-level OCP executive orchestrating the chaos from above. Unsurpassably thrilling, unexpectedly moving and unforgettably hilarious in equal measure, the future of law enforcement is back in a definitive Blu-ray™ presentation packed with hours of brand new bonus features and exclusive collectable packaging. Limited Edition Contents: 4K restoration of the film from the original camera negative by MGM, transferred in 2013 and approved by director Paul Verhoeven Newly commissioned artwork by Paul Shipper Director's Cut and Theatrical Cut of the film on two High Definition (1080p) Blu-ray™ discs Original lossless stereo and four-channel mixes plus DTS-HD MA 5.1 surround sound option on both cuts Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing on both cuts Six collector's postcards (Limited Edition exclusive) Double-sided, fold-out poster (Limited Edition exclusive) Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork Limited edition collector's booklet featuring new writing on the film by Omar Ahmed, Christopher Griffiths and Henry Blyth, a 1987 Fangoria interview with Rob Bottin, and archive publicity materials (some contents exclusive to Limited Edition) Disc One Director's Cut Archive commentary by director Paul Verhoeven, executive producer Jon Davison and co-writer Ed Neumeier (originally recorded for the Theatrical Cut and re-edited in 2014 for the Director's Cut) New commentary by film historian Paul M. Sammon New commentary by fans Christopher Griffiths, Gary Smart and Eastwood Allen The Future of Law Enforcement: Creating RoboCop, a newly filmed interview with co-writer Michael Miner RoboTalk, a newly filmed conversation between co-writer Ed Neumeier and filmmakers David Birke (writer of Elle) and Nick McCarthy (director of Orion Pictures' The Prodigy) Truth of Character, a newly filmed interview with star Nancy Allen on her role as Lewis Casting Old Detroit, a newly filmed interview with casting director Julie Selzer on how the film's ensemble cast was assembled Connecting the Shots, a newly filmed interview with second unit director and frequent Verhoeven collaborator Mark Goldblatt Composing RoboCop, a new tribute to composer Basil Poledouris featuring film music experts Jeff Bond, Lukas Kendall, Daniel Schweiger and Robert Townson RoboProps, a newly filmed tour of super-fan Julien Dumont's collection of original props and memorabilia 2012 Q&A with the Filmmakers, a panel discussion featuring Verhoeven, Davison, Neumeier, Miner, Allen, star Peter Weller and animator Phil Tippett RoboCop: Creating a Legend, Villains of Old Detroit and Special Effects: Then & Now, three archive featurettes from 2007 featuring interviews with cast and crew Paul Verhoeven Easter Egg Four deleted scenes The Boardroom: Storyboard with Commentary by Phil Tippett Director's Cut Production Footage, raw dailies from the filming of the unrated gore scenes Two theatrical trailers and three TV spots Extensive image galleries Disc Two Theatrical Cut Archive commentary by director Paul Verhoeven, executive producer Jon Davison and co-writer Ed Neumeier (originally recorded for Theatrical version of the film) Two Isolated Score tracks (Composer's Original Mix and Final Theatrical Mix) in lossless stereo Edited-for-television version of the film, featuring alternate dubs, takes and edits of several scenes (95 mins, SD only) Split screen comparison of Theatrical and Director's Cuts RoboCop: Edited For Television, a compilation of alternate scenes from two edited-for-television versions, newly transferred in HD from recently-unearthed 35mm elements

  • Robocop Trilogy [Remastered] [Blu-ray]Robocop Trilogy | Blu Ray | (26/05/2014) from £15.99   |  Saving you £-8.00 (N/A%)   |  RRP £7.99

    No matter how hard you look, the brutal truth of the Robocop Trilogy is that there’s only one film in there that’s consistently worthy of your attention. Yet this keenly priced boxset does offer a chance to look at the two subsequent sequels with the benefit of a high-definition upgrade. And while both have major problems, they still make for intriguing viewing. The original first, though. Robocop is a bone-fide science fiction masterpiece, an hour and a half of satire, violence, humour and the future of law enforcement. There’s a fairly conventional good vs evil story at the heart of it, yet this is nonetheless an ambitious film, gloriously realised on a low budget. The sequel, Robocop 2, tries its damnedest to mirror the original, but it stumbles several times, not least for failing to carve out an identity of its own. So keen is it to be reverent to what went before, that the film suffers. But there are ideas here, and moments that make the movie well worth sitting through. The third? Well, Robocop 3 is car crash cinema, sadly. Shoddy effects, and a decision to tame down the violent edge for a more child-friendly rating costs the film dear. It’s entertaining, albeit not for the right reasons. Yet this remains a fascinating trilogy, boasting one excellent movie, one intriguing failure, and one film that’s as far removed from what made Robocop so interesting in the first place that it’s almost hard to resist. --Jon Foster

  • Carrie [Blu-ray]Carrie | Blu Ray | (16/04/2018) from £14.55   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    In 1974, Stephen King published his first novel, the story of Carrie White, a troubled young girl, bullied by her peers and daughter to a fanatical fundamentalist mother, who discovers she has telekinetic powers. In 1976, it became the first of his works to be adapted for the big screen and, to this day, remains one of the very best. Carrie marked Brian De Palma's arrival as a major director, following smaller cult films such as Sisters, Phantom of the Paradise and Obsession, and provided a key early role for Sissy Spacek (Badlands), one that would earn her a Best Actress nomination at the Academy Awards. Piper Laurie would also pick up a nomination, for Best Supporting Actress, as Carrie's mother, while future stars such as Amy Irving, John Travolta and Nancy Allen were give their first major parts in a big-screen production. Restored in 4K from the original negative, this collector's edition provides the definitive release of a horror classic. Extras: 4K restoration from the original negative High Definition (1080p) presentation DTS-HD 5.1 Master Audio and uncompressed 1.0 mono soundtracks Optional subtitles for the deaf and hard-of-hearing Commentary by Lee Gambin, author of Nope, Nothing Wrong Here: The Making of Cujo, and Alexandra Heller-Nicholas, author of Cultographies: Ms. 45 and Devil's Advocates: Suspiria, recorded exclusively for this release Brand-new visual essay comparing the various versions and adaptations of Carrie across the years Acting Carrie, archive featurette containing interviews with director Brian De Palma, actors Sissy Spacek, Piper Laurie, Amy Irving, William Katt and others More Acting Carrie, additional interviews with the cast of the film Visualising Carrie: From Words to Images, archive featurette containing interviews with De Palma, writer Lawrence D. Cohen, editor Paul Hirsch and art director Jack Fisk Singing Carrie: Carrie the Musical, archive featurette on the stage musical adaptation of King's novel Writing Carrie, an interview with writer Lawrence D. Cohen Shooting Carrie, an interview with cinematographer Mario Tosi Cutting Carrie, an interview with editor Paul Hirsch Casting Carrie, an interview with casting director Harriet B. Helberg Bucket of Blood, an interview with composer Pino Donaggio Horror's Hallowed Grounds, a look back at the locations of Carrie Gallery Trailer TV spots Radio spots Carrie trailer reel Reversible sleeve featuring original and new artwork by Laz Marquez

  • Robocop [Remastered] [Blu-ray]Robocop | Blu Ray | (27/01/2014) from £6.99   |  Saving you £13.00 (65.00%)   |  RRP £19.99

    When it arrived on the big screen in 1987, Paul Verhoeven's RoboCop was like a high-voltage jolt of electricity, blending satire, thrills, and abundant violence with such energized gusto that audiences couldn't help feeling stunned and amazed. The movie was a huge hit, and has since earned enduring cult status as one of the seminal science fiction films of the 1980s. Followed by two sequels, a TV series, and countless novels and comic books, this original RoboCop is still the best by far, largely due to the audacity and unbridled bloodlust of director Verhoeven. However, the reasons many enjoyed the film are also the reasons some will surely wish to avoid it. Critic Pauline Kael called the movie a dubious example of "gallows pulp," and there's no denying that its view of mankind is bleak, depraved, and graphically violent. In the Detroit of the near future, a policeman (Peter Weller) is brutally gunned down by drug-dealing thugs and left for dead, but he survives (half of him, at least) and is integrated with state-of-the-art technology to become a half-robotic cop of the future, designed to revolutionize law enforcement. As RoboCop holds tight to his last remaining shred of humanity, he relentlessly pursues the criminals who "killed" him. All the while, Verhoeven (from a script by Edward Neumeier and Michael Miner) injects this high-intensity tale with wickedly pointed humour and satire aimed at the men and media who cover a city out of control. --Jeff Shannon, amazon.com

  • Robocop [1988]Robocop | DVD | (28/07/2003) from £4.49   |  Saving you £15.50 (345.21%)   |  RRP £19.99

    He's RoboCop. And in the near future he's law enforcement's only hope. A sadistic crime wave is sweeping across America. In Old Detroit the situation is so bad a private corporation Omni Consumer Products (OCP) has assumed control of the police force. The executives at the company think they have the answer - until the enforcement droid they create kills one of their own. Then an ambitious young executive seizes the opportunity. He and his research team at Security Concept

  • Robocop Boxset [DVD]Robocop Boxset | DVD | (02/09/2009) from £13.48   |  Saving you £-3.49 (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Synopsis TBC

  • Poltergeist III [1988]Poltergeist III | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £5.99   |  Saving you £7.00 (116.86%)   |  RRP £12.99

    He's found her. They're back...again! And they're still looking for Carol Anne (the late Heather O'Rourke) in this riveting and climactic finale to the Poltergeist trilogy. Sent by her parents to live in a Chicago high rise with her aunt (Nancy Allen) uncle (Tom Skerritt) and cousin (Lara Flynn Boyle) Carol Anne must face demons more frightening than ever before as they move from invading homes to taking over an entire skyscraper!

  • Robocop Trilogy [1987]Robocop Trilogy | DVD | (04/02/2002) from £11.99   |  Saving you £23.00 (230.23%)   |  RRP £32.99

    Paul Verhoeven was almost unknown in Hollywood prior to the release of RoboCop in 1987. But after this ultra-violent yet strangely subversive and satirical sci-fi picture became a huge hit his reputation for extravagant and excessive, yet superbly well-crafted filmmaking was assured. Controversial as ever, Verhoeven saw the blue-collar cop (Peter Weller) who is transformed into an invincible cyborg as "an American Jesus with a gun", and so the film dabbles with death and resurrection imagery as well as mercilessly satirising Reagan-era America. No targets escape Verhoeven's unflinching camera eye, from yuppie excess and corporate backstabbing to rampant consumerism and vacuous media personalities. As with his later sci-fi satire Starship Troopers the extremely bloody violence resolutely remains on the same level as a Tom and Jerry cartoon. The inevitable sequel, competently directed by Irvin Kershner, thankfully continues to mine the dark vein of anti-consumerist satire while being reflexively aware that it is itself a shining example of that which it is lampooning. Sadly the third instalment in the series, now without Peter Weller in the title role, is exactly the kind of dumbed-down production-line flick that the corporate suits of OCP might have dreamed up at a marketing meeting. Its only virtue is a decent music score from regular Verhoeven collaborator Basil Poledouris, whose splendid march theme returned from the original score. On the DVD: Packaged in a fold-out slipcase these three discs make a very collectable set. All are presented in 1.85:1 anamorphic prints, although only the first movie has any extra material worth mentioning. Here the Director's Cut option allows the viewer to see Paul Verhoeven's more explicitly violent versions of Murphy's "assassination", ED-209's bloody malfunction and the shootout finale. These extended sequences are handily signposted in the scene selection menu, and the filming of them can be seen in a sequence of Director's Cut footage. Deleted scenes include "Topless Pizza" ("I'll buy that for a dollar!") and there are two contemporary "making of" featurettes plus a good, new half-hour retrospective. Both the latter and the director's commentary make abundantly clear the Reagan-era satire and are chock full of quotable lines from Verhoeven--"I wanted to show Satan killing Jesus"--and his producer--"Fascism for liberals". Stop-motion animator Phil Tippett gives a commentary on the storyboard-to-film comparisons, and there are the usual trailers and photos. Showing just how much the sequels are rated in comparison, the second and third discs have nothing but theatrical trailers and their sound is just Dolby 2.0 whereas the original movie has been remastered into Dolby 5.1.--Mark Walker

  • Robocop 3 [1993]Robocop 3 | DVD | (24/01/2000) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Early on in Robocop 3, an action figure of our metal hero on the nightstand in a little girl's room informs us that he's now become a children's toy. The image is right on the money; despite following up two of the most violent, hilarious sci-fi/action films ever made, Robocop 3 is strictly for the kiddies. It's not just that the gore has been toned down considerably to make for a PG-13 rating; also excised is the straight-faced portrait of a world run by corporate fascism. When evil corporation OCP, and its even more evil Japanese parent company, plan to raze a Detroit neighbourhood to put up the shining new Delta City, the residents (including the aforementioned adolescent, who conveniently happens to be a computer expert) gang up to fight back, just like the angry neighbours in Death Wish V. Robocop (played this time out by Robert John Burke, Peter Weller having wisely passed) could be a hindrance to the companies' plans, so a ninja android is sent in to deal with him. Even all this could have been enjoyable, in a campy sort of way, but nothing pays off as either comedy or action--tellingly, the two big showdowns with the ninja start exhilaratingly (Robocop's clunky movements hilariously counterpoised by the android's acrobatic leaps), only to end just when they're getting good. Director Fred Dekker has some nice stylistic touches scattered about, but not nearly enough to save the film. One high note, though: the animated "Johnny Rehab" spot may be the funniest ad in the whole series. --Bruce Reid, Amazon.com

  • Robocop [Blu-ray]Robocop | Blu Ray | (25/11/2019) from £13.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    In a dystopic and crime-ridden Detroit, a terminally wounded cop returns to the force as a powerful cyborg haunted by submerged memories.

  • I Wanna Hold Your Hand [Blu-ray]I Wanna Hold Your Hand | Blu Ray | (20/06/2016) from £7.15   |  Saving you £12.84 (64.20%)   |  RRP £19.99

  • Dressed to Kill [Blu-ray]Dressed to Kill | Blu Ray | (29/07/2013) from £14.99   |  Saving you £5.00 (33.36%)   |  RRP £19.99

    After sexually frustrated housewife Kate Miller (Angie Dickinson) has a session with her psychiatrist Dr Elliott (Michael Caine) she silently seduces a man in an art gallery an assignation that ends in murder and the only witness high-class prostitute Liz Blake (Nancy Allen) being stalked by the killer in turn. One of Brian De Palma's darkest and most controversial suspense thrillers Dressed to Kill was as acclaimed for its stylish set-pieces and lush Pino Donaggio score as it was condemned for its sexual explicitness and blatant borrowings from Alfred Hitchcock in general and Psycho in particular. But the glee with which De Palma turns this material inside out is completely infectious as he delves deep inside the troubled psyches of his characters (critic Pauline Kael said that the film was permeated with the distilled essence of impure thoughts) in order to undermine expectations at every turn. Special Features: High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation of the feature Optional original uncompressed Mono 2.0 Audio and DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 Surround Sound Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing Symphony of Fear: Producer George Litto discusses his working relationship with Brian De Palma Dressed in White: Star Angie Dickinson on her role in the film Dressed in Purple: Star Nancy Allen discusses her role in the film Lessons in Filmmaking: Actor Keith Gordon discusses Dressed to Kill The Making of a Thriller – A documentary on the making of Dressed to Kill featuring writer-director Brian De Palma George Litto stars Angie Dickinson Nancy Allen Dennis Franz and more! Unrated R-Rated and TV-Rated Comparison Featurette Slashing Dressed to Kill – Brian De Palma and stars Nancy Allen and Keith Gordon discuss the changes that had to be made to avoid an X-rating Original Theatrical Gallery Reversible sleeve with original and newly commissioned artwork by Nathanel Marsh Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by critic and author Maitland McDonagh illustrated with original archive stills and promotional material “Filled to the brim with DePalma's characteristic visual flair Dressed to Kill is an amazing film just to look at” - Reel Film

  • Robocop SteelBook Limited Edition [Blu-ray]Robocop SteelBook Limited Edition | Blu Ray | (25/11/2019) from £22.42   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    PART MAN, PART MACHINE, ALL COP RoboCop, from Orion Pictures, marked director Paul Verhoeven's (Flesh + Blood) Hollywood debut and instantly became an enduring sci-fi/action classic when it landed in theaters in the summer of 1987. Verhoeven's peerlessly exciting and kinetic visuals were matched by a sharp script, iconic cast and exceptional special effects by Rob Bottin (The Thing) and Phil Tippett (The Empire Strikes Back). The film takes place in Detroit in the not-too-distant future. Heroic cop Alex Murphy (Peter Weller, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai) is gunned down in the line of duty, only to be resurrected as RoboCop a cybernetic mix of spare human parts and Motor City steel, and the latest defense against crime designed by the all-powerful OCP Corporation. As RoboCop's memories of his former life as Murphy resurface, only his ex-partner (Nancy Allen, Dressed To Kill) stands beside him to fight against the vicious thugs responsible for his death, as well as a nefarious top-level OCP executive orchestrating the chaos from above. Unsurpassably thrilling, unexpectedly moving and unforgettably hilarious in equal measure, the future of law enforcement is back in a definitive Blu-ray™ presentation packed with hours of brand new bonus features. Steelbook Contents: 4K restoration of the film from the original camera negative by MGM, transferred in 2013 and approved by director Paul Verhoeven Director's Cut and Theatrical Cut of the film on two High Definition (1080p) Blu-ray™ discs Original lossless stereo and four-channel mixes plus DTS-HD MA 5.1 surround sound option on both cuts Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing on both cuts Limited edition collectors' booklet featuring new writing on the film by Omar Ahmed, Christopher Griffiths and Henry Blyth Disc One Director's Cut Archive commentary by director Paul Verhoeven, executive producer Jon Davison and co-writer Ed Neumeier (originally recorded for the Theatrical Cut and re-edited in 2014 for the Director's Cut) New commentary by film historian Paul M. Sammon New commentary by fans Christopher Griffiths, Gary Smart and Eastwood Allen The Future of Law Enforcement: Creating RoboCop, a newly filmed interview with co-writer Michael Miner RoboTalk, a newly filmed conversation between co-writer Ed Neumeier and filmmakers David Birke (writer of Elle) and Nick McCarthy (director of Orion Pictures' The Prodigy) Truth of Character, a newly filmed interview with star Nancy Allen on her role as Lewis Casting Old Detroit, a newly filmed interview with casting director Julie Selzer on how the film's ensemble cast was assembled Connecting the Shots, a newly filmed interview with second unit director and frequent Verhoeven collaborator Mark Goldblatt Composing RoboCop, a new tribute to composer Basil Poledouris featuring film music experts Jeff Bond, Lukas Kendall, Daniel Schweiger and Robert Townson RoboProps, a newly filmed tour of super-fan Julien Dumont's collection of original props and memorabilia 2012 Q&A with the Filmmakers, a panel discussion featuring Verhoeven, Davison, Neumeier, Miner, Allen, star Peter Weller and animator Phil Tippett RoboCop: Creating a Legend, Villains of Old Detroit and Special Effects: Then & Now, three archive featurettes from 2007 featuring interviews with cast and crew Paul Verhoeven Easter Egg Four deleted scenes The Boardroom: Storyboard with Commentary by Phil Tippett Director's Cut Production Footage, raw dailies from the filming of the unrated gore scenes Two theatrical trailers and three TV spots Extensive image galleries Disc Two Theatrical Cut Archive commentary by director Paul Verhoeven, executive producer Jon Davison and co-writer Ed Neumeier (originally recorded for Theatrical version of the film) Two Isolated Score tracks (Composer's Original Mix and Final Theatrical Mix) in lossless stereo Edited-for-television version of the film, featuring alternate dubs, takes and edits of several scenes (95 mins, SD only) Split screen comparison of Theatrical and Director's Cuts RoboCop: Edited For Television, a compilation of alternate scenes from two edited-for-television versions, newly transferred in HD from recently-unearthed 35mm elements

  • Dressed To Kill [1979]Dressed To Kill | DVD | (29/04/2002) from £9.43   |  Saving you £3.56 (37.75%)   |  RRP £12.99

    To condemn Dressed to Kill as a Hitchcock rip-off is to miss the sheer enjoyment of Brian De Palma's delirious thriller. Homages to Hitchcock run rampant through most of De Palma's earlier films, and this one's chock-full of visual quotes, mostly cribbed from Vertigo and Psycho. But De Palma's indulgent depravity transcends simple mimicry to assume a vitality all its own. It's smothered in thickly atmospheric obsessions with sex, dread, paranoia, and voyeurism, not to mention a heavy dose of Psycho-like psychobabble about a wannabe transsexual who is compelled to slash up any attractive female who reminds him--the horror--that he's still very much a man. Angie Dickinson plays the sexually unsatisfied, forty-something wife who's the killer's first target, relaying her sexual fantasies to her psychiatrist (Michael Caine) before actually living one of them out after the film's celebrated cat-and-mouse sequence in a Manhattan art museum. The focus then switches to a murder witness (De Palma's then-girlfriend Nancy Allen) and Dickinson's grieving whiz-kid son (Keith Gordon), who attempt to solve the murder while staying one step ahead (or so they think) of the crude detective (Dennis Franz) assigned to the case. Propelled by Pino Donaggio's lush and stimulating score, De Palma's visuals provide seductive counterpoint to his brashly candid dialogue, and the plot conceals its own implausibility with morbid thrills and intoxicating suspense. If you're not laughing at De Palma's shameless audacity, you're sure to be on the edge of your seat. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Poltergeist III [Blu-ray] [1988]Poltergeist III | Blu Ray | (07/10/2013) from £9.49   |  Saving you £0.50 (5.27%)   |  RRP £9.99

    In this climactic finale to the Poltergeist trilogy Carol Anne moves to a Chicago high-rise to live with her aunt (Nancy Allen) uncle (Tom Skerritt) and cousin (Lara Flynn Boyle). But she soon finds herself facing demons more frightening than ever before as they move from invading homes to taking over an entire skyscraper!

  • I Wanna Hold Your Hand [DVD]I Wanna Hold Your Hand | DVD | (25/04/2016) from £6.09   |  Saving you £8.90 (59.40%)   |  RRP £14.99

  • Blow Out [Blu-ray]Blow Out | Blu Ray | (27/05/2013) from £21.58   |  Saving you £1.41 (6.53%)   |  RRP £22.99

    One of Brian De Palma's most acclaimed films, this brilliant fusion of the obsessive sleuthing of Blow-up and The Conversation with themes drawn from real-life political scandals (the JFK assassination, Chappaquiddick, Watergate) starts with sound technician Jack Terry (John Travolta) accidentally recording what might be explosive evidence of a deadly conspiracy. Brilliantly shot by the then recent Oscar-winner Vilmos Zsigmond, this terrifically stylish thriller co-stars Nancy Allen as the eyewitness who becomes the unwitting target of John Lithgow's serial killer as he ruthlessly attempts to bury all the evidence. It's also a film about the filmmaking process: Terry is originally hired to work on the low-budget slasher film Coed Frenzy, and later turns his technical skills to much more serious use as he tries to reconstruct a political assassination on film in a way that will stand up in court. Special Features: New, restored digital transfer, supervised and approved by director Brian De Palma Original Dolby 2.0 DTS-HD Master Audio Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing Black and White in Colour: An Interview with cinematographer Vilmos Zsigmond Rag Doll Memories: Nancy Allen on Blow Out Return to Philadelphia: An interview with Producer George Litto A gallery of on-set photos by photographer Louis Goldman Reversible sleeve with original and newly commissioned artwork by Joe Wilson Original Theatrical Trailer Collector’s booklet featuring new writing on the film by Michael Atkinson, a conversation between Quentin Tarantino and De Palma, and more to be confirmed!

  • Blow Out [1980]Blow Out | DVD | (29/04/2002) from £9.43   |  Saving you £3.56 (37.75%)   |  RRP £12.99

    ""A great movie!"" -Pauline Kael The New Yorker. John Travolta (Pulp Fiction Face/Off) stars in this riveting mystery/thriller filled with powerful performances intense action and an ""engrossing web of suspense and intrigue"" (Blockbuster Entertainment Guide). Written and directed by master filmmaker Brian De Palma (Mission: Impossible) Blow Out is a heart-stopping adventure hailed by Rolling Stone as ""an American moviemaking triumph!"" Jack Terri (Travolta) is a talented audio tech

  • Carrie Limited Edition [Blu-ray]Carrie Limited Edition | Blu Ray | (11/12/2017) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    This terrifying adaptation of Stephen King's bestselling horror novel was directed by shock maestro Brian De Palma for maximum, no-holds-barred effect. Sissy Spacek stars as Carrie White, the beleaguered daughter of a religious kook (Piper Laurie) and a social outcast tormented by her cruel, insensitive classmates. When her rage turns into telekinetic powers, however, school's out in every sense of the word. De Palma's horrific climax in a school gym lingers forever in the memory, though the film is also built upon Spacek's remarkable performance and Piper Laurie's outlandishly creepy one. John Travolta has a small part as a thug, De Palma's future wife, Nancy Allen, is his girlfriend, and Amy Irving makes her screen debut as one of the girls giving Carrie a hard time.--Tom Keogh

  • The Gladiator [1986]The Gladiator | DVD | (04/03/2002) from £11.25   |  Saving you £-7.00 (N/A%)   |  RRP £2.99

    Los Angeles which lives by the automobile has begun to die by it. A homicidal maniac the Skull has been terrorizing the city killing motorists at random with his death car. But when Rick's little brother is killed Rick becomes part Guardian Angel part crusader and part warrior with one thing on his mind - revenge.

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