"Actor: Nova Pilbeam"

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  • Young and Innocent [Blu-ray]Young and Innocent | Blu Ray | (19/01/2015) from £8.98   |  Saving you £9.00 (150.25%)   |  RRP £14.99

    Celebrated for the macabre tour-de-force plots and sublime twist endings that would come to define the very genre of suspense Alfred Hitchcock is one of cinema's greatest auteurs his career spanning six decades and over sixty films. One of Hitchcock's most significant pre-war thrillers – a series of films that would help pave the way to even greater success in Hollywood – Young and Innocent stars Derrick de Marney as Robert Tisdall a man who turns fugitive after he finds the body of a young woman washed up on a beach and is promptly accused of her murder; Nova Pilbeam is the beautiful young lady whose help he enlists and George Curzon features in one of his best-known British film roles as the jealous ex-husband who harbours a terrible secret...

  • The Ealing Studios Rarities Collection - Volume 9 [DVD]The Ealing Studios Rarities Collection - Volume 9 | DVD | (20/01/2014) from £6.79   |  Saving you £8.20 (120.77%)   |  RRP £14.99

    A global byword for cinematic quality of a quintessentially British nature, Ealing Studios made more than 150 films over a three decade period. A cherished and significant part of British film history, only selected films from both the Ealing and Associated Talking Pictures strands have previously been made available on home video format - with some remaining unseen since their original theatrical release. The Ealing Rarities Collection redresses this imbalance - featuring new transfers from...

  • The Man Who Knew Too Much [Blu-ray]The Man Who Knew Too Much | Blu Ray | (19/01/2015) from £6.79   |  Saving you £8.20 (120.77%)   |  RRP £14.99

    Alfred Hitchcock himself called this 1934 British edition of his famous kidnapping story "the work of a talented amateur", while his 1956 Hollywood remake was the consummate act of a professional director. Be that as it may, this earlier movie still has its intense admirers who prefer it over the Jimmy Stewart--Doris Day version, and for some sound reasons. Tighter, wittier, more visually outrageous (back-screen projections of Swiss mountains, a whirly-facsimile of a fainting spell), the film even has a female protagonist (Edna Best in the mom part) unafraid to go after the bad guys herself with a gun. (Did Doris Day do that that? Uh-uh.) While the 1956 film has an intriguing undercurrent of unspoken tensions in nuclear family politics, the 1934 original has a crisp air of British optimism glummed up a bit when a married couple (Best and Leslie Banks) witness the murder of a spy and discover their daughter stolen away by the culprits. The chase leads to London and ultimately to the site of one of Hitch's most extraordinary pieces of suspense (though on this count, it must be said, the later version is superior). Take away distracting comparisons to the remake, and this Man Who Knew Too Much is a milestone in Hitchcock's early career. Peter Lorre makes his British debut as a scarred, scary villain. --Tom Keogh

  • Tudor Rose - Digitally Remastered [DVD]Tudor Rose - Digitally Remastered | DVD | (20/03/2017) from £8.85   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    A dramatization of Lady Jane Grey's short life, from her forced marriage (which she resisted) to her brief reign as monarch of England and finally to her beheading. The film portrays her as an innocent set up for the slaughter while the scheming courtiers and pretenders to the throne barely pay her mind, as they stab each other in the back in their attempts to gain power and influence.

  • Young and Innocent [1938]Young and Innocent | DVD | (18/08/2008) from £3.99   |  Saving you £2.00 (50.13%)   |  RRP £5.99

    When a woman's body is discovered on the beach by one of her former lovers he races off to call the police. But two witnesses see him run and think he is the escaping killer. After being arrested he manages to escape in the confusion at the courthouse. With the assistance of the Police Constable's daughter he tries to prove his innocence while avoiding the police...

  • Spring Meeting [DVD]Spring Meeting | DVD | (15/02/2016) from £6.98   |  Saving you £5.00 (100.20%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Hitchcock heroine Nova Pilbeam demonstrates her considerable flair for comedy in this incredibly popular wartime adaptation of the hit play by Irish author Molly Keane (a.k.a. M.J. Farrell) and John Perry. Co-starring Michael Wilding, Basil Sydney and Margaret Rutherford, Spring Meeting released in America as Three Wise Brides is featured here in a brand-new transfer from original film elements, in its original aspect ratio.Tiny Fox-Collier and her son, Tony, are broke. A cheery and handsome young man about town, Tony knows he can rely on his mother for a brainwave to save them from utter destitution. This she has: a visit is scheduled to the Irish country estate of her old flame Sir Richard Furze, now a wealthy widower with two daughters. But while Tiny is determined to see her son marry the beautiful but haughty Joan, it seems Tony only has eyes for Joan's spirited younger sister, Baby...SPECIAL FEATURES:Image galleryOriginal script PDFOriginal theatre programme PDF

  • Banana Ridge/Aren't Men Beasts [DVD]Banana Ridge/Aren't Men Beasts | DVD | (26/05/2014) from £9.98   |  Saving you £5.00 (62.58%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Aldwych Theatre farceur Robertson Hare and character comedian Alfred Drayton reprise their original stage roles in two classic screen comedies. Both films are brand-new transfers from the original film elements in their as-exhibited theatrical aspect ratio. Only one copy of Aren't Men Beasts! is known to exist and its soundtrack is incomplete - for these two mute sections we have included English subtitles. Banana RidgeA screen adaptation of Ben Travers' celebrated and enduring farce - a wonderfully mischievous comedy of disputed paternity and caddishness. On the morning of his son's wedding a mild-mannered dentist is visited by a dark beautiful girl who disarranges her dress and screams for the police! Aren't Men Beasts!Hollywood star June Clyde co-stars in this boisterous comedy caper. two businessmen have the shock of their lives when a woman appears out of their past bearing a 23 year old son - and one of them may be the father!

  • Spring Meeting [DVD]Spring Meeting | DVD | (09/09/2019) from £15.56   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Hitchcock heroine Nova Pilbeam demonstrates her considerable flair for comedy in this incredibly popular wartime adaptation of the hit play by Irish author Molly Keane (a.k.a. M.J. Farrell) and John Perry. Co-starring Michael Wilding, Basil Sydney and Margaret Rutherford, Spring Meeting is featured here in a new High Definition transfer from original film elements, in its original aspect ratio. Tiny Fox-Collier and her son, Tony, are broke. A cheery and handsome young man about town, Tony knows he can rely on his mother for a brainwave to save them from utter destitution. This she has: a visit is scheduled to the Irish country estate of her old flame Sir Richard Furze, now a wealthy widower with two daughters. But while Tiny is determined to see her son marry the beautiful but haughty Joan, it seems Tony only has eyes for Joan's spirited younger sister, Baby...

  • Next Of KinNext Of Kin | DVD | (10/04/2006) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    A collection of four important wartime films. Released by the famed Ealing Studios in 1942 The Next of Kin graphically illustrated the disastrous effect of careless talk on the Home Front and how it almost wrecks a daring British commando raid. Churchill personally wanted to see it banned! The New Lot follows the adventures of raw army recruits in 1943 while 1945s Read All About It was an Army Bureau of Current Affairs film dramatising a discussion withthe ex-editor of a newspaper ab

  • The Man Who Knew Too Much [1934]The Man Who Knew Too Much | DVD | (31/01/2000) from £10.19   |  Saving you £-0.20 (-2.00%)   |  RRP £9.99

    Alfred Hitchcock himself called this 1934 British edition of his famous kidnapping story "the work of a talented amateur", while his 1956 Hollywood remake was the consummate act of a professional director. Be that as it may, this earlier movie still has its intense admirers who prefer it over the Jimmy Stewart--Doris Day version, and for some sound reasons. Tighter, wittier, more visually outrageous (back-screen projections of Swiss mountains, a whirly-facsimile of a fainting spell), the film even has a female protagonist (Edna Best in the mom part) unafraid to go after the bad guys herself with a gun. (Did Doris Day do that that? Uh-uh.) While the 1956 film has an intriguing undercurrent of unspoken tensions in nuclear family politics, the 1934 original has a crisp air of British optimism glummed up a bit when a married couple (Best and Leslie Banks) witness the murder of a spy and discover their daughter stolen away by the culprits. The chase leads to London and ultimately to the site of one of Hitch's most extraordinary pieces of suspense (though on this count, it must be said, the later version is superior). Take away distracting comparisons to the remake, and this Man Who Knew Too Much is a milestone in Hitchcock's early career. Peter Lorre makes his British debut as a scarred, scary villain. --Tom Keogh

  • The Man Who Knew Too Much [1934]The Man Who Knew Too Much | DVD | (25/04/2005) from £15.98   |  Saving you £1.01 (5.90%)   |  RRP £16.99

    The 1934 version of 'The Man Who Knew Too Much' was an international hit for Alfred Hitchcock and transformed him from a British filmmaker to a worldwide household name. The story centres on a British family who befriend a jovial Frenchman while vacationing in Switzerland. The Frenchman is soon mortally wounded and before he dies whispers a secret to Banks. Foreign agents witness this incident and kidnap Banks' daughter to prevent him from revealing this terrible secret. The acting a

  • Young And Innocent [1938]Young And Innocent | DVD | (15/01/2001) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £14.99

    Among Alfred Hitchcock's pre-Hollywood movies, 1938's Young and Innocent is a most unfairly overlooked classic. It's full of themes and stylistic touches that became permanent fixtures in his career. Based on Josephine Tey's novel A Shilling for Candles, the film title refers to the characters' outlook. However Hitchcock characteristically chips away at that innocence with flourishes of macabre humour, such as scenes of a dead rat at the lunch table and a hopeless conference with a defence lawyer, while suspense is heightened in a game of blindman's buff at a children 's party. The story concerns a typically Hitchcockian innocent man (Derrick de Marney) on the run, with a trivial object to find (a raincoat) that will prove his innocence. He's helped by a fiery young girl (Nova Pilbeam) who's unfortunately the daughter of the chief constable, but has some handy first aid skills. There's also an oppressive mother figure in the shape of an overbearing aunt (Mary Clare). Aside from these thematic traits, what remains impressive for viewers new or old is Hitchcock's technical set-pieces: a car sinks into a mineshaft, a railway station is recreated in miniature, and the twitchy-eyed murderer is finally located via an extended aerial tracking shot across a ballroom (pre-empting many similar shots, eg: Notorious). This sequence took two days to accomplish, and demonstrates the director was more than ready to move to the older and less innocent American industry . --Paul Tonks

  • Young And Innocent [1938]Young And Innocent | DVD | (22/01/2007) from £8.08   |  Saving you £-2.09 (-34.90%)   |  RRP £5.99

    Former child star Nova Pilbeam - the kidnapping victim in 'The Man Who Knew Too Much' reappears in this light hearted and unpretentious mystery shot on location in Cornwall. Playing the daughter of a local constable Pilbeam shelters a suspected murderer (Derrick DeMarney) and a charming romance develops. The highlight of this rare Hitchcock film is a stunningly intricate camera crane shot of the twitching eyes of the guilt-ridden killer: a jazz drummer in blackface. It took two days to shoot and is one of a continuous move lasting one minute and ten seconds focusing down from 145 feet to 4 inches.

  • Young And Innocent (Hitchcock) [DVD] [1938]Young And Innocent (Hitchcock) | DVD | (12/04/2010) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £7.99

    Among Alfred Hitchcock's pre-Hollywood movies, 1938's Young and Innocent is a most unfairly overlooked classic. It's full of themes and stylistic touches that became permanent fixtures in his career. Based on Josephine Tey's novel A Shilling for Candles, the film title refers to the characters' outlook. However Hitchcock characteristically chips away at that innocence with flourishes of macabre humour, such as scenes of a dead rat at the lunch table and a hopeless conference with a defence lawyer, while suspense is heightened in a game of blindman's buff at a children 's party. The story concerns a typically Hitchcockian innocent man (Derrick de Marney) on the run, with a trivial object to find (a raincoat) that will prove his innocence. He's helped by a fiery young girl (Nova Pilbeam) who's unfortunately the daughter of the chief constable, but has some handy first aid skills. There's also an oppressive mother figure in the shape of an overbearing aunt (Mary Clare). Aside from these thematic traits, what remains impressive for viewers new or old is Hitchcock's technical set-pieces: a car sinks into a mineshaft, a railway station is recreated in miniature, and the twitchy-eyed murderer is finally located via an extended aerial tracking shot across a ballroom (pre-empting many similar shots, eg: Notorious). This sequence took two days to accomplish, and demonstrates the director was more than ready to move to the older and less innocent American industry . --Paul Tonks

  • Young & Innocent/The Cheney Vase [Special Edition]Young & Innocent/The Cheney Vase | DVD | (24/07/1999) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £4.47

  • The Man Who Knew Too Much [1934]The Man Who Knew Too Much | DVD | (24/05/2004) from £8.38   |  Saving you £-2.39 (-39.90%)   |  RRP £5.99

    Alfred Hitchcock himself called this 1934 British edition of his famous kidnapping story "the work of a talented amateur", while his 1956 Hollywood remake was the consummate act of a professional director. Be that as it may, this earlier movie still has its intense admirers who prefer it over the Jimmy Stewart--Doris Day version, and for some sound reasons. Tighter, wittier, more visually outrageous (back-screen projections of Swiss mountains, a whirly-facsimile of a fainting spell), the film even has a female protagonist (Edna Best in the mom part) unafraid to go after the bad guys herself with a gun. (Did Doris Day do that that? Uh-uh.) While the 1956 film has an intriguing undercurrent of unspoken tensions in nuclear family politics, the 1934 original has a crisp air of British optimism glummed up a bit when a married couple (Best and Leslie Banks) witness the murder of a spy and discover their daughter stolen away by the culprits. The chase leads to London and ultimately to the site of one of Hitch's most extraordinary pieces of suspense (though on this count, it must be said, the later version is superior). Take away distracting comparisons to the remake, and this Man Who Knew Too Much is a milestone in Hitchcock's early career. Peter Lorre makes his British debut as a scarred, scary villain. --Tom Keogh

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