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Richard Gere: List of Movies, Films and TV Shows

  • Pretty Woman [1990] Pretty Woman | DVD | (12/09/2005) from £4.49  |  Saving you £10.50 (70.00%)  |  RRP £14.99

  • An Officer And A Gentleman [1981] An Officer And A Gentleman | DVD | (09/04/2001) from £3.98  |  Saving you £11.50 (71.90%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Richard Gere plays an enrollee at a Naval officers candidate school and Debra Winger is the woman who wants him.That's pretty much it, story-wise, in this romantic drama, which is more effective in a moment-to-moment, scene-by-scene way, where the two stars and Oscar-winner Louis Gossett Jr.--as Gere's tough-as-nails drill instructor--are fun to watch. Sexy, syrupy, with occasional pitches of high drama (Gere having a near-breakdown during training is pretty strong), An Officer and a Gentleman proves to be a no-brainer date movie. --Tom Keogh

  • Hachi - A Dog's Tale [DVD] [2008] Hachi - A Dog's Tale | DVD | (05/07/2010) from £5.69  |  Saving you £14.30 (71.50%)  |  RRP £19.99

    A college professor takes in a dog he finds abandoned and both find their lives changed forever as they form an unbreakable bond. Based on the true story of Hachiko an Akita dog in 1920s Japan remembered for his remarkable loyalty to his master.

  • The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel [DVD] The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel | DVD | (29/06/2015) from £3.99  |  Saving you £16.00 (80.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    While preparing for his imminent marriage to the love of his life Sunaina (Tina Desai). Sonny (Dev Patel) has his eye on a promising property now that his first venture The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel for the Elderly and Beautiful has only a single remaining vacancy – posing a rooming predicament for fresh arrivals Guy (Richard Gere) and Lavinia (Tamsin Greig). Evelyn and Douglas (Judi Dench and Bill Nighy) have now joined the Jaipur workforce while Norman and Carol (Ronald Pickup and Diana Hardcastle) are negotiating the tricky waters of an exclusive relationship as Madge (Celia Imrie) juggles two eligible and very wealthy suitors. And newly installed co-manager of the hotel Muriel (Maggie Smith) knows everyone's secrets. As the demands of a traditional Indian wedding threaten to engulf them all an unexpected way forward presents itself.

  • First Knight [1995] First Knight | DVD | (12/04/2004) from £4.49  |  Saving you £1.50 (25.00%)  |  RRP £5.99

    Lancelot (Richard Gere) a nomadic rogue has no ties no enemies and no fear until that is he meets the beautiful Lady Guinevere of Leonesse (Julia Ormond). Guinevere has promised to marry King Arthur (Sean Connery) not only because his armies can protect her country but because she truly loves him. But her chance encounter with Lancelot as she prepares to enter Camelot stirs conflicting and powerful emotions within her. Arthur welcomes both into his city with open heart little foreseeing how his great capacity for love and trust opens the doors for his own betrayal...

  • Chicago [2003] Chicago | DVD | (04/08/2003) from £3.78  |  Saving you £6.00 (50.00%)  |  RRP £11.99

    Adapted from the long-running stage version, this big-screen Chicago is a non-stop singing and dancing extravaganza that may well herald the welcome revival of the film musical. When the part-time lover of wannabe star Roxie (Renee Zellweger) is murdered, she is banged up with Chicago's most famous singing murderess, Velma (Catherine Zeta-Jones). They compete for the attention of the best lawyer in town, Billy Flynn (Richard Gere). Drawn to the special angle of Roxie's case (the sweetest killer to hit Chicago), Flynn offers her a taste of stardom and her daydreams of singing on stage are juxtaposed with the action. Chicago has transferred well to film, seamlessly merging Dennis Potter-esque dream sequences with the action. Though the stage show uses sets sparingly, here the look has been heavily influenced by the only successful musical of recent times, Moulin Rouge, with heavy velvets and drapery offering a rich feel to the murky underworld of 1920s Chicago clubs. The hot question is: can the movie stars cut it as performers? Surprisingly, it is Zellweger who looks most comfortable in the part, regardless of her awkward dancing. Zeta-Jones is just that little bit too butch to be believable as a flapper girl, despite her stage school roots, and lacks a certain panache. But one thing is in her favour: she's believable as the ultimate starlet bitch. Gere does not fare much better, with his tap-dancing sequence littered with cutaways (mercifully his dancing and singing is kept to a minimum). The real show-stealer is Queen Latifah, whose matron of the cells is perfect and her singing spot-on. More than anything else, though, this film will whet your appetite to see the original on the West End stage. --Nikki Disney On the DVD: Chicago on DVD demonstrates that the producers of Rob Marshall's Oscar-winning film obviously took to heart the lyrics "Give 'em the old Razzle Dazzle", as the widescreen 1.85:1 anamorphic transfer is rich with the lush colours, vibrant tones and sparkling audio that wowed audiences in the cinema. If only the extras had been given the same treatment. There's nothing like the plethora of special features that greeted fans of Moulin Rouge here; there is a grand total of three: a passable director's commentary, a deleted song, "Class", which is so dull you don't question why it didn't make the final cut, and a making-of feature, which is entertaining but nothing new. All in all, there's a very disappointing and unimaginative selection. --Kristen Bowditch

  • Runaway Bride [1999] Runaway Bride | DVD | (08/01/2001) from £4.19  |  Saving you £11.80 (73.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    It took nearly a decade to find a mutually agreeable screenplay, but the stars and director of Pretty Woman finally reunited to make Runaway Bride, wisely avoiding any attempt to recapture the 1990 film's elusive magic. The result is a perfectly pleasant romantic comedy that would've fared better critically (despite boffo box office) if it hadn't been overshadowed by its blockbuster predecessor. It is certainly a more credible film than Pretty Woman, trading a far-fetched fairy tale (hooker hooks up with tycoon? bah!) for a more amiably conventional plot about big-city reporter Ike Graham (Richard Gere) who falls for a small-town handywoman Maggie Carpenter (Julia Roberts) with a nasty habit of fleeing from the altar in a recurring state of premarital panic. Both characters are instantly likeable, and the smooth dialogue by Josann McGibbon and Sara Parriott only occasionally panders to sitcom cuteness. And despite his routine sacrifice of subtle craft for commercial appeal, director Garry Marshall knows when to trust his stars and material, lending this movie a casual charm (aided by a terrific supporting cast) that never feels forced or artificial. The whole thing's utterly predictable, riding on the suspenseless question of whether Maggie will dump her sports-nut fiancé (Christopher Meloni) and tie the knot with Ike. It's a foregone conclusion after the usual games of romantic cat and mouse, but the chemistry between Roberts and Gere is undeniable, and with a decade's worth of additional stardom between them, they shine as brightly as ever. --Jeff Shannon

  • The Honorary Consul [Blu-ray] The Honorary Consul | Blu Ray | (22/04/2019) from £11.79  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £N/A

    To all appearances the two men had nothing in common, but for the fact they were both residents of the Argentine outpost of Corrientes and shared an English background. Eduardo Plarr was a diligent, hardworking man of medicine; Charley Fortnum an alcoholic, good-for-nothing Honorary Consul. Taken captive when a terrorist plan to kidnap an American diplomat backfires, they both become prey to some very unwholesome revelations. For some time, both men have been sharing the favours of, and an obsession with the same woman. Only one has the capacity to love her.

  • Nights In Rodanthe [2008] Nights In Rodanthe | DVD | (09/02/2009) from £3.09  |  Saving you £12.90 (80.70%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Based on the novel by Nicholas Sparks Nights In Rodanthe features Diane Lane and Richard Gere in a touching romantic story. In Nights in Rodanthe Diane Lane stars as Adrienne Willis a woman with her life in chaos who retreats to the tiny coastal town of Rodanthe in the Outer Banks of North Carolina to tend to a friend's inn for the weekend. Here she hopes to find the tranquility she so desperately needs to rethink the conflicts surrounding her - a wayward husband who has asked to come home and a teenaged daughter who resents her every decision. Almost as soon as Adrienne gets to Rodanthe a major storm is forecast and a guest named Dr. Paul Flanner (Richard Gere) arrives. The only guest at the inn Flanner is not on a weekend escape but rather is there to face his own crisis of conscience. Now with the storm closing in the two turn to each other for comfort and in one magical weekend set in motion a life-changing romance that will resonate throughout the rest of their lives

  • Shall We Dance? [2004] Shall We Dance? | DVD | (20/06/2005) from £3.34  |  Saving you £10.71 (59.50%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Something got lost in translation from 1996's critically acclaimed Japanese comedy, but the American remake of Shall We Dance? is not without charms of its own. In being transplanted from Tokyo to Chicago, the original version's subtle humor is shaken out of its cultural context, but this is an otherwise faithful adaptation in which a weary lawyer (Richard Gere) battles his mid-life crisis with ballroom dancing lessons, while his wife (Susan Sarandon) hires a private detective to see if he's cheating. Those expecting a Jennifer Lopez showcase will be disappointed; her role as the melancholy dance instructor keeps the beautifully lovelorn J-Lo on the sidelines, while a cast of standard-issue supporting characters (especially Stanley Tucci's clandestine faux-Latin dance lover) provide a generous dose of Hollywood-ized comic relief. All of this gives Shall We Dance? a polished sheen of mainstream entertainment that many viewers---and especially ballroom dancers--will find delightfully irresistible. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • An Officer and a Gentleman [Blu-ray] [1982] [Region Free] An Officer and a Gentleman | Blu Ray | (17/04/2019) from £8.00  |  Saving you £11.99 (60.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Richard Gere plays an enrollee at a Naval officers candidate school and Debra Winger is the woman who wants him.That's pretty much it, story-wise, in this romantic drama, which is more effective in a moment-to-moment, scene-by-scene way, where the two stars and Oscar-winner Louis Gossett Jr.--as Gere's tough-as-nails drill instructor--are fun to watch. Sexy, syrupy, with occasional pitches of high drama (Gere having a near-breakdown during training is pretty strong), An Officer and a Gentleman proves to be a no-brainer date movie. --Tom Keogh

  • Pretty Woman/The runaway Bride [1990] Pretty Woman/The runaway Bride | DVD | (20/08/2007) from £5.58  |  Saving you £12.41 (69.00%)  |  RRP £17.99

    Pretty Woman: Julia Roberts stars a street-wise down-on-her-luck working girl whose chance encounter with a handsome corporate mogul leads to an improbable love affair... and a modern-day Cinderella fantasy that has captured the hearts of movie-goers all over the world. Featuring a chart-topping soundtrack this is an irresistible and timeless romantic comedy. Runaway Bride: ""Roberts and Gere confirm their status as an eternal screen team"" in this delightful laugh-filled romantic comedy. Roberts plays small-town girl Maggie Carpenter whose marches down the aisle become a series of near Mrs. when she bolts before saying ""I Do"". Gere is Ike graham a cynical big city newspaper columnist eager to write a tell-all story about Maggie. But the more Ike finds out about skittish Maggie the more he finds he's falling in love...

  • Final Analysis [1992] Final Analysis | DVD | (22/11/1999) from £2.87  |  Saving you £8.61 (61.50%)  |  RRP £13.99

    This film, which again pairs Richard Gere and Kim Basinger (who starred in 1986's No Mercy), offers up elements of classic noir: a hapless man becomes intimately involved with a beautiful blonde who may or may not be who or what she appears to be. Dedicated psychiatrist Isaac Barr (Gere) reluctantly, and then more obsessively, becomes involved with Heather Evans (Basinger), the sister of his patient, Diana Baylor (Uma Thurman). Evans is unhappily married to a gangster (appropriately played by a muscular and menacing Eric Roberts in a trademark role). Gere and Basinger make a credible, if dangerous couple, and Thurman delivers a subtle, understated performance and demonstrates her range and potential. The thriller is appropriately shot in gorgeous San Francisco, where the literal and figurative curving and hilly roads wind throughout. Credit legendary art director Dean Tavoularis for some amazing sets and scenes, notably the elegantly cavernous restaurant where Evans and her husband have a fateful dinner. This film is, in a way, glossy director Phil Joanou's Hitchcockian tribute--as a climactic lighthouse scene best demonstrates. Final Analysis doesn't offer an intimate look at its characters, but a beautifully stylized one, moody and gloomy. The intricate plot experiments with the device of "pathological intoxication," in which the subject completely loses control after drinking alcohol. And this doesn't mean a conventional ugly drunk; it means a frightening psychotic. Good and evil, hope and despair, beauty and repulsion are often juxtaposed in the film's complex world. --NF Mendoza

  • Chicago [2002] Chicago | DVD | (25/02/2008) from £3.99  |  Saving you £13.80 (76.70%)  |  RRP £17.99

    At a time when crimes of passion result in celebrity headlines nightclub sensation Velma Kelly (Catherine Zeta Jones) and spotlight-seeking Roxie Hart (Renee Zellweger) both find themselves sharing space on Chicago's famed Murderess Row! They also share Billy Flynn (Richard Gere) the town's slickest lawyer with a talent for turning notorious defendants into local legends. But in Chicago there's only room for one legend!

  • Autumn In New York [2001] Autumn In New York | DVD | (03/12/2001) from £5.50  |  Saving you £5.80 (29.00%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Autumn in New York is a by-the-numbers love story, right down to its opening shot of, yes, autumn in New York. Richard Gere stars as restaurateur/lady's man Will, while Winona Ryder plays the airy-fairy, oh-too-delicate-for-this-world Charlotte. Will is 48, Charlotte is 22, and it just keeps getting creepier: Will actually used to hang out with Charlotte's mom. She plays artily with beads and sparkly things, he notices how elfin and different she is (inspiring such stomach-churning dialogue as "I find you completely unprecedented and therefore utterly unpredictable"), and soon they're in love. Ah, but it's doomed: she has a tumor in her heart (just in case you missed the significance, Charlotte says "I'm sick in my heart"). Does Charlotte have enough time left to teach Will to truly love? While Gere does a stoic job, Ryder spends a lot of time being darling and winsome, aided by the fact that Charlotte has managed to catch one of those special movie diseases where you never look bad or get tubes stuck up your nose. Director Joan Chen doesn't have much of a script to work with, but at least she knows how to pick a cinematographer; the whole movie is shot in gorgeous autumnal colours. Several excellent supporting actors are trapped in this movie: Jill Hennessey and Anthony LaPaglia do their very best, but what can they do in the face of such a sweeping, creepy love? Autumn in New York is nothing if not an earnest movie, and it certainly means well. Much like Charlotte, it seems to cry, "Can you let me love you? Please?". The answer is an emphatic "No". --Ali Davis, Amazon.com

  • Pretty Woman [Blu-ray] [1990] Pretty Woman | Blu Ray | (09/02/2009) from £6.09  |  Saving you £17.90 (74.60%)  |  RRP £23.99

    Richard Gere and Best Actress Oscar Nominee Julia Roberts light up the screen in this classic romantic comedy. When successful corporate mogul Edward Lewis meets independent and carefree hooker Vivian Ward their two lives are worlds apart. But Vivian's energetic spirit challenges Edward's no-nonsense business-minded approach to life sparking an immediate attraction. He teaches her about the finer things in life; she teaches him that love could be the best investment he ever made. Capturing the hearts of critics and filmgoers alike this modern-day rags-to-riches romance entertains with its upbeat blend of humor passion and unforgettable fun!

  • Richard Gere - An Officer And A Gentleman / Internal Affairs / Primal Fear Richard Gere - An Officer And A Gentleman / Internal Affairs / Primal Fear | DVD | (10/10/2005) from £N/A  |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)  |  RRP £19.99

    An Officer And A Gentleman (Dir. Taylor Hackford 1981): Zack Mayo is a young loner with a bad attitude. Tempted by the glamour and admiration of the life of a Navy pilot he decides to sign up for Officer Candidate School. After thirteen tortuous weeks under Gunnery Sergeant Emil Foley (Gossett Jnr.) he slowly begins to learn the importance of discipline love and friendship. Foley warns Zack about the local girls who will do anything to catch themselves a pilot for a husband

  • Unfaithful [2002] Unfaithful | DVD | (28/04/2003) from £5.37  |  Saving you £9.40 (58.80%)  |  RRP £15.99

    Although the premise of infidelity and its devastating consequences on all involved may not be a new one, Unfaithful still manages to emerge as a stylish, involving thriller. Based on an obscure 1970s French offering, director Adrian Lynne's version is pure Hollywood, from its casting of Richard Gere and Diane Lane in the lead roles, to its graceful visual style and even its somewhat unsatisfactory denouement. It's impossible not to watch the film without thinking of Lynne's own Fatal Attraction, although here the gender roles have been reversed to focus on the affair between bored suburban housewife Connie and exotic French book dealer Paul. The obsessive relationship between the two provides the film with its only real frisson. Gere is given very little to work with as the dull cuckolded husband Edward and delivers even less. The film moves rather slowly towards its key plot twist which never really lives up to its promise. On the DVD: Unfaithful may be lacking a little as a film, but this DVD is an impressive package. The film has a rich visual element and the digital picture quality brings out the best in Adrian Lynne's unique eye for detail. The reams of extras include commentaries from director Lynne and the cast, a well put together documentary, interviews, features, deleted scenes and a (superior) alternative ending. Lynne is always good interview value, coming across as a slightly less eccentric Ken Russell, and Lane and Olivier Martinez are both engaging and charismatic. A shame, then, that the movie itself isn't quite so impressive. --Phil Udell

  • I'm Not There [2007] I'm Not There | DVD | (14/07/2008) from £4.11  |  Saving you £11.93 (59.70%)  |  RRP £19.99

    Unapologetically audacious, I'm Not There is more post-modern puzzle than by-the-numbers biopic. A title card sets the scene: "Inspired by the music and many lives of Bob Dylan." Yet the film features no figure by that name. Instead, writer/director Todd Haynes presents six characters, each incarnating different stages in the artist's career. Perfume's Ben Whishaw, a black-clad poet, serves as a slippery sort of narrator. The action begins with the wanderings of an 11-year-old black runaway named "Woody Guthrie" (Marcus Carl Franklin)--his raucous duet with Richie Havens on "Tombstone Blues" is a highlight--and ends with a silver-haired Billy the Kid (Richard Gere) watching the Old West die before his eyes. In the interim, there's the folk singer-turned-preacher (Christian Bale), the actor (Heath Ledger), and the rock star (Cate Blanchett, who has Don't Look Back Dylan down to a science). The chronology is purposefully non-linear, and editor Jay ! Rabinowitz cuts rapidly, Jean-Luc Godard-style, between cinéma vérité black-and-white and saturated colour, Richard Lester-like slapstick and Fellini-inspired surrealism (Ed Lachman served as cinematographer). What makes the picture fun for Dylan fans--and potentially frustrating for neophytes--is that every album and movie bears an alternate title. Ledger's Robbie, for instance, stars in "Grain of Sand," actually a reference to the Pete Seeger song. As in Haynes' glam rock reverie Velvet Goldmine, the trickery involves the entire cast. While Julianne Moore plays former lover Alice, a dead ringer for Joan Baez, Michelle Williams embodies elusive scenester Coco, i.e. Edie Sedgwick. If I'm Not There is less affecting than Control, the year's other big music film, it rewards repeat viewings like few biographical features. The soundtrack mixes originals with covers, like Jim James's heartfelt "Goin' to Acapulco." --Kathleen C. Fennessy

  • Doctor T. And The Women [2001] Doctor T. And The Women | DVD | (07/01/2002) from £4.25  |  Saving you £8.04 (40.20%)  |  RRP £19.99

    The contrary streak in Robert Altman's work is particularly evident in Dr T & the Women, which casts Richard Gere as a smooth, upper-crust Dallas gynaecologist surrounded by dotty women. Surprisingly Gere does not play the sensitive seducer but a genuine admirer of women who is nevertheless progressively bewildered by the sheer number of neurotic females within his life. Dr Sullivan Travis (Gere) tries to cope with a wife (Farrah Fawcett) who reverts to childhood thanks to a rare psychological syndrome brought on by being loved and cared for too much, a sister-in-law (Laura Dern) who tipples and talks constantly as she tries to run the household, one daughter (Kate Hudson) who is about to have an elaborate wedding even though she is actually in love with a college friend (Liv Tyler) and another daughter (Tara Reid) who works in the local assassination conspiracy tourist industry, not to mention a nurse (Shelley Long) who is blindly in love with him and a deceptively sensible golf pro (Helen Hunt) who isn't. Unlike Gosford Park, this isn't major Altman--it draws a little too much on some of his earlier hits and sometimes twitters too close to low comedy--but it has many of his unique virtues: a sort of cynical warmth in entering an enclosed, oddball world (here, a side of Texas rarely seen on screen) and an uncanny ability to draw the best out of an apparently randomly assembled ensemble cast. On the DVD: A flawless 1:2.35 letterboxed print, enhanced for 16x9. Otherwise, it's a very nice package. A commentary track assembles thoughts from Altman, screenwriter Anne Rapp and a large amount of the cast, all offering insight into the unusual way that Altman puts a film together and often throwing in surprising bits of information (that Farrah Fawcett was offered Basic Instinct but turned it down because of the nudity, though she has a tasteful clothes-off scene here). Also, a standard making-of short with more soundbites, the theatrical trailer, a few filmographies and a 15-minute to-camera interview with Altman. --Kim Newman

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