"Actor: Spencer Treat Clark"

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  • Glass [DVD] [2019]Glass | DVD | (20/05/2019) from £5.99   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    M. Night Shyamalan brings together the narratives of two of his stand-out originalsUnbreakable and Splitin one explosive comic-book thriller. Following the conclusion of Split, David Dunn (Bruce Willis) pursues Kevin Wendell Crumb's superhuman figure of The Beast (James McAvoy) in a series of escalating encounters. But the shadowy presence of Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson)known also by his pseudonym, Mr. Glassemerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men, in this riveting culmination of Shyamalan's worldwide blockbusters!

  • Unbreakable [DVD]Unbreakable | DVD | (29/07/2013) from £4.69   |  Saving you £13.30 (283.58%)   |  RRP £17.99

    Bruce Willis (The Sixth Sense, Armageddon) and Samuel L. Jackson (Deep Blue Sea, Pulp Fiction) star in a mind-shattering, suspense-filled thriller that stays with you long after the end of this riveting supernatural film. When David Dunn (Willis) emerges from a horrific train crash as the sole survivor - and without a single scratch on him - he meets a mysterious stranger, Elijah Price (Jackson), who will change David's life forever. Interrupting his life at odd moments, it's Elijah's presenc...

  • Gladiator (2000) - Two Disc SetGladiator (2000) - Two Disc Set | DVD | (20/11/2000) from £6.85   |  Saving you £21.13 (547.41%)   |  RRP £24.99

    Upon the sudden death of Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, his trusted and successful general Narcissus Meridas is unlawfully imprisoned and condemned to the gladiator games by Marcus's twisted son Commodus.

  • Glass [Blu-ray] [2019] [Region Free]Glass | Blu Ray | (20/05/2019) from £8.69   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    M. Night Shyamalan brings together the narratives of two of his stand-out originalsUnbreakable and Splitin one explosive comic-book thriller. Following the conclusion of Split, David Dunn (Bruce Willis) pursues Kevin Wendell Crumb's superhuman figure of The Beast (James McAvoy) in a series of escalating encounters. But the shadowy presence of Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson)known also by his pseudonym, Mr. Glassemerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men, in this riveting culmination of Shyamalan's worldwide blockbusters!

  • Glass [Blu-ray + 4K UHD] [2018]Glass | Blu Ray | (20/05/2019) from £15.29   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    M. Night Shyamalan brings together the narratives of two of his stand-out originalsUnbreakable and Splitin one explosive comic-book thriller. Following the conclusion of Split, David Dunn (Bruce Willis) pursues Kevin Wendell Crumb's superhuman figure of The Beast (James McAvoy) in a series of escalating encounters. But the shadowy presence of Elijah Price (Samuel L. Jackson)known also by his pseudonym, Mr. Glassemerges as an orchestrator who holds secrets critical to both men, in this riveting culmination of Shyamalan's worldwide blockbusters!

  • Mystic River [2003]Mystic River | DVD | (01/06/2006) from £5.38   |  Saving you £8.61 (61.50%)   |  RRP £13.99

    Clint Eastwood's story of three men whose dark, interwoven history forces them to come to terms with a brutal murder on the mean streets of Boston.

  • The Shyamalan Collection: Signs, Unbreakable and The Sixth Sense [5 Disc Collector's Edition] [2002]The Shyamalan Collection: Signs, Unbreakable and The Sixth Sense | DVD | (31/03/2003) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £34.99

    M Night Shyamalan's breakout third feature, The Sixth Sense sets itself up as a thriller poised on the brink of delivering monstrous scares, but gradually evolves into more of a psychological drama with supernatural undertones. The bare bones of the story are basic enough, but the moody atmosphere created by Shyamalan and cinematographer Tak Fujimoto made this one of the creepiest pictures of 1999, forsaking excessive gore for a sinisterly simple feeling of chilly otherworldliness. Even if you figure out the film's surprise ending, it packs an amazingly emotional wallop when it comes, and will have you racing to watch the movie again with a new perspective. --Mark Englehart M Night Shyamalan reunites with Bruce Willis in Unbreakable for another story of everyday folk baffled by the supernatural (or at least unknown-to-science). This time around, Willis has paranormal, possibly superhuman abilities, and a superbly un-typecast Samuel L Jackson is the investigator who digs into someone else's strange life to prompt startling revelations about his own. Throughout, the film refers to comic-book imagery, while the lectures on artwork and symbolism feed back into the plot. The last act offers a terrific suspense-thriller scene, which (like the similar family-saving at the end of The Sixth Sense) is a self-contained sub-plot that slingshots a twist ending that may have been obvious all along. Some viewers may find the stately solemnity with which Shyamalan approaches a subject usually treated with colourful silliness off-putting, but Unbreakable wins points for not playing safe and proves that both Willis and Jackson, too often cast in lazy blockbusters, have the acting chops to enter the heart of darkness. --Kim Newman After tackling ghosts and superheroes, M Night Shyamalan brings his distinctive, oblique approach to aliens in Signs. With Mel Gibson replacing Bruce Willis as the traditional Shyamalan hero--a family man traumatised by loss--and leaving urban Philadelphia for the Pennsylvania sticks, the film starts with crop circles showing up on the property Gibson shares with his ex-ballplayer brother (Joaquin Phoenix) and his two troubled pre-teen kids. Though the world outside is undergoing a crisis of Independence Day-sized proportions, Shyamalan limits the focus to this family, who retreat into their cellar when "intruders" arrive from lights in the sky and set out to "harvest" them. The tone is less certain than the earlier films--some of the laughs seem unintentional and Gibson's performance isn't quite on a level with Willis's commitment--but Shyamalan still directs the suspense and shock dramas better than anyone else. --Kim Newman

  • The Last Exorcism Part 2 - The Beginning Of The End [Blu-ray]The Last Exorcism Part 2 - The Beginning Of The End | Blu Ray | (30/09/2013) from £5.29   |  Saving you £17.70 (77.00%)   |  RRP £22.99

    When Nell wakes up in hospital with little memory of a terrifying event resulting in the death of her father she is placed in temporary care. But when she starts to hear voices and see satanic signs it isn't long before her dark past catches up with her once more.

  • Arlington Road [1999]Arlington Road | DVD | (15/01/2008) from £4.49   |  Saving you £1.50 (25.00%)   |  RRP £5.99

    Michael Faraday (Jeff Bridges) and his 10 year old son Grant (Spencer Treat Clark) are both trying to come to terms with the loss two years earlier of Michael's wife Grant's mother. When they befriend a family from across the road things seem to get a little better for them. However as the families become closer Michael starts having misgivings about Oliver and Cheryl Lang (Tim Robbins Joan Cusack) and begins investigating them. He soon realises that the Langs are definitely no

  • Unbreakable -- 2-disc Collector's Edition [2000]Unbreakable -- 2-disc Collector's Edition | DVD | (29/10/2001) from £10.78   |  Saving you £7.21 (66.88%)   |  RRP £17.99

    In Unbreakable, writer-director M. Night Shyamalan reunites with Sixth Sense star Bruce Willis, comes up with another story of everyday folk baffled by the supernatural (or at least unknown-to-science) and returns to his home town, presenting Philadelphia as a wintry haunt of the bizarre yet transcendent. This time around, Willis (in earnest, agonised, frankly bald Twelve Monkeys mode) has the paranormal abilities, and a superbly un-typecast Samuel L. Jackson is the investigator who digs into someone else's strange life to prompt startling revelations about his own. David Dunn (Willis), an ex-jock security guard with a failing marriage (to Robin Wright Penn), is the stunned sole survivor of a train derailment. Approached by Elijah Price (Jackson), a dealer in comic book art who suffers from a rare brittle bone syndrome, Dunn comes to wonder whether Price's theory that he has superhuman abilities might not hold water. Dunn's young son Joseph (Spencer Treat Clark) encourages him to test his powers and the primal scene of Superman bouncing a bullet off his chest is rewritten as an amazing kitchen confrontation when Joseph pulls the family gun on Dad in a desperate attempt to convince him that he really is unbreakable (surely, "Invulnerable" would have been a more apt title). Half-convinced he is the real-world equivalent of a superhero, Dunn commences a never-ending battle against crime but learns a hard lesson about balancing forces in the universe. Throughout, the film refers to comic-book imagery--with Dunn's security guard slicker coming to look like a cape, and Price's gallery taking on elements of a Batcave-like lair--while the lectures on artwork and symbolism feed back into the plot. The last act offers a terrific suspense-thriller scene, which (like the similar family-saving at the end of The Sixth Sense) is a self-contained sub-plot that slingshots a twist ending that may have been obvious all along. Some viewers might find the stately solemnity with which Shyamalan approaches a subject usually treated with colourful silliness offputting, but Unbreakable wins points for not playing safe and proves that both Willis and Jackson, too often cast in lazy blockbusters, have the acting chops to enter the heart of darkness. --Kim Newman

  • Gladiator -- Superbit [2000]Gladiator -- Superbit | DVD | (12/05/2003) from £5.96   |  Saving you £7.03 (54.10%)   |  RRP £12.99

    A big-budget summer epic with money to burn and a scale worthy of its golden Hollywood predecessors, Ridley Scott's Gladiator is a rousing, grisly, action-packed epic that takes movie-making back to the Roman Empire via computer-generated visual effects. While not as fluid as the computer work done for, say, Titanic, it's an impressive achievement that will leave you marvelling at the glory that was Rome, when you're not marvelling at the glory that is Russell Crowe. Starring as the heroic general Maximus, Crowe firmly cements his star status both in terms of screen presence and acting chops, carrying the film on his decidedly non-computer-generated shoulders as he goes from brave general to wounded fugitive to stoic slave to gladiator hero. Gladiator's plot is a whirlwind of faux-Shakespearean machinations of death, betrayal, power plays, and secret identities (with lots of faux-Shakespearean dialogue ladled on to keep the proceedings appropriately "classical"), but it's all briskly shot, edited, and paced with a contemporary sensibility. Even the action scenes, somewhat muted but graphic in terms of implied violence and liberal bloodletting, are shot with a veracity that brings to mind--believe it or not--Saving Private Ryan. As Crowe's nemesis, the evil emperor Commodus, Joaquin Phoenix chews scenery with authority, whether he's damning Maximus's popularity with the Roman mobs or lusting after his sister Lucilla (beautiful but distant Connie Nielsen); Oliver Reed, in his last role, hits the perfect notes of camp and gravitas as the slave owner who rescues Maximus from death and turns him into a Colosseum star. Director Scott's visual flair is abundantly in evidence, with breathtaking shots and beautiful (albeit digital) landscapes, but it's Crowe's star power that will keep you in thrall--he's a true gladiator, worthy of his legendary status. Hail the conquering hero! --Mark Englehart, Amazon.com

  • Arlington Road [1999]Arlington Road | DVD | (20/12/1999) from £9.88   |  Saving you £3.11 (23.90%)   |  RRP £12.99

    It's easy to understand why Arlington Road sat on the studio shelf for nearly a year. No, the film isn't awful; rather, it's an extremely edgy and ultimately bleak thriller that offers no clear-cut heroes or villains. In other words, Hollywood had no idea how to sell it. Director Mark Pellington's underrated directorial debut, Going All the Way, suffered the same fate, essentially because the film-maker's presentation of suburban America often shifts dramatically within the same film. Characters are usually miserable and bordering on meltdown, no situation is straightforward and things usually end badly. Arlington Road begins as an astute study of suburban paranoia. Michael Faraday (a face-pinched Jeff Bridges, who spends most of the film on the brink of tears) is a college professor who teaches American history courses on terrorism. He's been a conspiracy freak since his wife, an FBI agent, was killed during a botched raid that feels like a thinly fictionalised reference to the Waco tragedy. After saving the life of his next-door neighbour's child, he initially befriends the family (Tim Robbins and Joan Cusack), but soon believes the husband is a terrorist. The first half of the film mocks Faraday: he has no real evidence and is not the most stable of protagonists. Despite the fact that it was government paranoia that got his wife killed, Faraday repeats the same type of behaviour. Pellington shifts gears in the second half, however, and for a while, it seems that the film has simultaneously sunk into a cheap, high-octane brand of Hollywood entertainment and undermined its own point. But Arlington Road possesses a stunning ending that's a real gut punch, one that may leave you needing a second viewing to catch all of its smartly executed setup. --Dave McCoy

  • The Last Exorcism Part 2 - The Beginning Of The End [DVD]The Last Exorcism Part 2 - The Beginning Of The End | DVD | (30/09/2013) from £4.69   |  Saving you £13.30 (73.90%)   |  RRP £17.99

    When Nell wakes up in hospital with little memory of a terrifying event resulting in the death of her father she is placed in temporary care. But when she starts to hear voices and see satanic signs it isn't long before her dark past catches up with her once more.

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