"Actor: Thomas Mitchell"

  • Gone With The WindGone With The Wind | DVD | (17/04/2019) from £6.45   |  Saving you £7.54 (116.90%)   |  RRP £13.99

    Absorbing film version of Margaret Mitchell's Pullitzer Prize-winning novel about life in America's Deep South during the Civil War. Winner of ten Academy Awards...

  • It's A Wonderful Life [DVD] [2016]It's A Wonderful Life | DVD | (07/11/2016) from £4.26   |  Saving you £3.44 (114.67%)   |  RRP £6.44

    Now perhaps the most beloved American film, It's a Wonderful Life was largely forgotten for years, due to a copyright quirk. Only in the late 1970s did it find its audience through repeated TV showings. Frank Capra's masterwork deserves its status as a feel-good communal event, but it is also one of the most fascinating films in the American cinema, a multilayered work of Dickensian density. George Bailey (played superbly by James Stewart) grows up in the small town of Bedford Falls, dreaming dreams of adventure and travel, but circumstances conspire to keep him enslaved to his home turf. Frustrated by his life, and haunted by an impending scandal, George prepares to commit suicide on Christmas Eve. A heavenly messenger (Henry Travers) arrives to show him a vision: what the world would have been like if George had never been born. The sequence is a vivid depiction of the American Dream gone bad, and probably the wildest thing Capra ever shot (the director's optimistic vision may have darkened during his experiences making military films in World War II). Capra's triumph is to acknowledge the difficulties and disappointments of life, while affirming--in the teary-eyed final reel--his cherished values of friendship and individual achievement. It's a Wonderful Life was not a big hit on its initial release, and it won no Oscars (Capra and Stewart were nominated); but it continues to weave a special magic. --Robert Horton

  • Black Knight [2002]Black Knight | DVD | (19/05/2003) from £7.49   |  Saving you £10.50 (140.19%)   |  RRP £17.99

    Martin Lawrence stars in this new comedy about a menial worker at a medieval theme park who falls into the polluted moat, only to end up in fourteenth century England, a world of knights in shining armour,a wicked king, and a damsel in distress!

  • Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (1939) [DVD] [2018]Mr. Smith Goes To Washington (1939) | DVD | (01/10/2018) from £5.00   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Mr Smith Goes To Washington (1939). Import from The Netherlands with English soundtrack and subtitles. Jean Arthur, James Stewart and Claude Rains star in Frank Capra's MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON, the award-winning 1939 classic about an idealistic, small town American senator who heads to Washington D.C. and suddenly finds himself single-handedly battling ruthless politicians out to destroy him. Receiving a total of eleven 1939 Oscar(r) nominations (including Best Picture and Best Director), and winning one (Best Writing, Original Story), MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON is considered one of Capra's, Stewart's and Columbia's finest films. In Frank Capra's bright, funny and beautifully paced satire Mr Smith Goes to Washington political heavyweights decide that Jefferson Smith (James Stewart), an obscure scoutmaster in a small town, would be the perfect dupe to fill a vacant US Senate chair. Surely this naïve bumpkin can be easily controlled by the senior senator (Claude Rains) from his state, a respectable yet corrupted career politician. Capra fills the film with Smith's wide-eyed wonder at the glories of Washington, all of which ring false for his cynical secretary (Jean Arthur) who doesn't believe for a minute this rube could be for real. But he is. Capra was repeating the formula of a previous film, Mr Deeds Goes to Town, but this one is even sharper. Stewart and Arthur are brilliant, and the former cowboy-star Harry Carey lends a warm presence to the role of the vice-president. Mr Smith Goes to Washington is Capra's ode to the power of innocence--an idea so potent that present-day audiences may find themselves wishing for a new Mr Smith in the halls of power. The 1939 US Congress was none too thrilled about the film's depiction of their august body, denouncing it as a caricature; but even today, Capra's jibes about vested interests and political machines look as accurate as ever.

  • The Keys of the Kingdom [Blu-ray]The Keys of the Kingdom | Blu Ray | (20/05/2013) from £13.07   |  Saving you £1.92 (12.80%)   |  RRP £14.99

    After losing his parents and his childhood sweetheart to tragedy, Francis Chisholm (Gregory Peck) joins the priesthood and devotes himself to a life of service and compassion. But Chisholm's unorthodox beliefs raise eyebrows among his superiors, especially Bishop Angus Mealy (Vincent Price). And when he is sent to the farthest reaches of China to rebuild an abandoned mission, Chisholm faces his greatest challenge of all: to tame a hostile land, win over a superstitious people and save his parish from an invading army. Nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Actor (Peck), The Keys of the Kingdom is a 'towering film stamped with greatness' (The Independent). Special Features: 'Gregory Peck: His Own Man' Documentary Stills Gallery Theatrical Trailer

  • 20th Century Epics: Ben Hur / Gone With The Wind / Doctor Zhivago [1940]20th Century Epics: Ben Hur / Gone With The Wind / Doctor Zhivago | DVD | (05/11/2001) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £39.99

    Three of the 20th century's greatest cinematic spectacles, 1939's Gone with the Wind, 1959's Ben-Hur and 1965's Doctor Zhivago, are collected here in one irresistible box set. Long before computers turned every crowd scene and every grandiose backdrop into a pixellated virtual construct, these movies did it all for real. Nothing can substitute for their authentic sense of what really makes an epic: strong characters, emotionally involving storytelling and the grandest, most romantic sense of large-scale moviemaking. All three contain sequences and images that are indelibly burned into popular consciousness. Just recall Vivien Leigh's walk through the wounded of Atlanta, or her pledge never to be hungry again silhouetted against an achingly vivid sunset. Remember Charlton Heston rowing the Roman galley, or charging round the arena in his chariot. Or the enigmatic beauty of Julie Christie, the train ride to the Urals and the charge into No Man's Land. On the DVDs: These priceless treasures from the MGM archives have been preserved and restored so marvellously that all three almost look like they were made last year, not decades ago. The vivid colours and detail of Gone with the Wind look astoundingly fresh in this anamorphic 1.33:1 print (just let your eyes drink in those burnished skies). Both Ben-Hur and Zhivago, too, benefit from anamorphic widescreen presentations that reveal every last gorgeous detail. All three discs also contain the full music scores, complete with Overtures and Intermission music: Max Steiner's immortal "Tara Theme" sounds as good as ever on the rich mono soundtrack; Miklos Rozsa's magnificent music for Ben-Hur is deservedly regarded as one of cinema's finest, while Maurice Jarre's famous "Lara's Theme" can even be heard in a separate music-only track on Zhivago. There are no extras on the Gone with the Wind disc, but the other two contain commentaries (from Charlton Heston and Omar Sharif respectively) and new, in-depth making-of documentaries. Zhivago also comes with a second bonus disc that has several contemporary behind-the-scenes pieces. The only moan is the infamous Warner packaging, which consists of their notorious cardboard sleeves that are easily damaged when trying to cram them into the thin cardboard slipcases. --Mark Walker

  • It's A Wonderful Life [1946]It's A Wonderful Life | DVD | (09/11/2007) from £N/A   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £17.99

    Hollywood's best-loved star teams up with America's favourite director to create one of the world's most popular films.

  • High Noon [1952]High Noon | DVD | (15/01/2001) from £12.98   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    One of the greatest Westerns ever made gets the deluxe treatment on this superior disc. Written by Carl Foreman (who was later blacklisted during the anticommunist hearings of the 1950s) and superbly directed by Fred Zinnemann, this 1952 classic stars Gary Cooper as just-married lawman Will Kane, who is about to retire as a small-town sheriff and begin a new life with his bride (Grace Kelly) when he learns that gunslinger Frank Miller (Ian MacDonald) is due to arrive at high noon to settle an old score. Kane seeks assistance from deputies and townsfolk, but soon realises he will have to stand alone in his showdown with Miller and his henchmen. Innovative for its time, the suspenseful story unfolds in approximate real time (from 10:40 a.m. to high noon in an 84-minute film), and many interpreted Foreman's drama as an allegorical reflection of apathy and passive acceptance of Senator Joseph McCarthy's anticommunist campaign. Political underpinnings aside, this remains a milestone of its genre (often referred to as the first "adult" Western), and Cooper is flawless in his Oscar-winning role. The first-rate DVD gives this landmark film all the respect it deserves, beginning with a digitally remastered transfer from the original film negative. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com

  • Village of the Damned / Children of the DamnedVillage of the Damned / Children of the Damned | DVD | (01/06/2007) from £6.49   |  Saving you £19.50 (300.46%)   |  RRP £25.99

    This release contains two suspenseful horror films from the 1960s: VILLAGE OF THE DAMNED and CHILDREN OF THE DAMNED.

  • Only Angels Have Wings [Criterion Collection] [Blu-ray] [2016]Only Angels Have Wings | Blu Ray | (18/04/2016) from £17.99   |  Saving you £10.00 (55.59%)   |  RRP £27.99

    Hands down, Only Angels Have Wings is one of the most buoyantly entertaining movies in the American cinema. It is also a razor-sharp example of the action-oriented films of Howard Hawks, the wide-ranging auteur who would go on to make To Have and Have Not and Red River. This one is set in Barranca, a South American port city swathed in perpetual night fog, where a band of mail pilots struggle daily to get their planes through a treacherous mountain pass. They don't care about the mail so much as they live by the rules of adventure, professionalism and friendly rivalry. Cary Grant is the leader of this daredevil group, a man who won't be pinned down to anything except his own code of stoicism. ("I don't believe in laying in a supply of anything" he says, which may be why he's always asking people for matches to light his cigarettes.) His cool style is tested by the arrival of a wisecracking blonde (Jean Arthur) and an ex-mistress (Rita Hayworth); Rita's now married to a pilot (Richard Barthelmess), disgraced by a single act of cowardice. Hawks always got great mileage from throwing a bunch of colourful characters together in an enclosed space, where death could strike in a moment. The great secret about Hawks is that although his feel for action was crackling, he was really more interested in the way people exchanged sidelong glances or lit each other's cigarettes--there's a lot of both in Only Angels Have Wings. --Robert Horton

  • Lost Horizon [1937]Lost Horizon | DVD | (26/02/2001) from £6.73   |  Saving you £13.26 (197.03%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Ronald Colman and Jane Wyatt star in this lavishly produced classic about the enchanted paradise of Shangri-La where time stands still. Frank Capra's enduring masterpiece Lost Horizon (based on the best-selling novel by James Hilton) had a running time of 132 minutes upon its initial release in 1937. For a World War II re-issue 24 minutes were cut to tone down the film's pacifist message. Film preservationist Robert Gitt working over a period of 25 years has utilized footage fo

  • It's A Wonderful Life [Blu-ray] [2016]It's A Wonderful Life | Blu Ray | (07/11/2016) from £9.99   |  Saving you £1.01 (12.64%)   |  RRP £9.00

    Now perhaps the most beloved American film, It's a Wonderful Life was largely forgotten for years, due to a copyright quirk. Only in the late 1970s did it find its audience through repeated TV showings. Frank Capra's masterwork deserves its status as a feel-good communal event, but it is also one of the most fascinating films in the American cinema, a multilayered work of Dickensian density. George Bailey (played superbly by James Stewart) grows up in the small town of Bedford Falls, dreaming dreams of adventure and travel, but circumstances conspire to keep him enslaved to his home turf. Frustrated by his life, and haunted by an impending scandal, George prepares to commit suicide on Christmas Eve. A heavenly messenger (Henry Travers) arrives to show him a vision: what the world would have been like if George had never been born. The sequence is a vivid depiction of the American Dream gone bad, and probably the wildest thing Capra ever shot (the director's optimistic vision may have darkened during his experiences making military films in World War II). Capra's triumph is to acknowledge the difficulties and disappointments of life, while affirming--in the teary-eyed final reel--his cherished values of friendship and individual achievement. It's a Wonderful Life was not a big hit on its initial release, and it won no Oscars (Capra and Stewart were nominated); but it continues to weave a special magic. --Robert Horton

  • Mr Smith Goes To Washington [1939]Mr Smith Goes To Washington | DVD | (26/02/2001) from £6.46   |  Saving you £13.53 (67.70%)   |  RRP £19.99

    In Frank Capra's bright, funny and beautifully paced satire Mr Smith Goes to Washington political heavyweights decide that Jefferson Smith (James Stewart), an obscure scoutmaster in a small town, would be the perfect dupe to fill a vacant US Senate chair. Surely this naïve bumpkin can be easily controlled by the senior senator (Claude Rains) from his state, a respectable yet corrupted career politician. Capra fills the film with Smith's wide-eyed wonder at the glories of Washington, all of which ring false for his cynical secretary (Jean Arthur) who doesn't believe for a minute this rube could be for real. But he is. Capra was repeating the formula of a previous film, Mr Deeds Goes to Town, but this one is even sharper. Stewart and Arthur are brilliant, and the former cowboy-star Harry Carey lends a warm presence to the role of the vice-president. Mr Smith Goes to Washington is Capra's ode to the power of innocence--an idea so potent that present-day audiences may find themselves wishing for a new Mr Smith in the halls of power. The 1939 US Congress was none too thrilled about the film's depiction of their august body, denouncing it as a caricature; but even today, Capra's jibes about vested interests and political machines look as accurate as ever. --Robert Horton, Amazon.com

  • The Dark Mirror [Blu-ray] [Region A & B & C]The Dark Mirror | Blu Ray | (11/06/2018) from £12.95   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    A man is stabbed to death, and all the signs are that his lover Terry Collins (Olivia de Havilland, Gone with the Wind) is the culprit. But it's impossible for Lieutenant Stevenson (Thomas Mitchell, Stagecoach) to prove this, as Terry has an identical twin sister, Ruth, and there's no way of demonstrating which one has the cast-iron alibi. From this gimmicky premise, director Robert Siodmak (The Spiral Staircase, The Killers) and producer/screenwriter Nunnally Johnson (The Woman in the Window) fashion a fascinatingly complex psychological film noir, as a psychologist (Lew Ayres, All Quiet on the Western Front) with a specialist interest in twins is brought in to help solve the crime. Delving deep into the personae of each sister, he finds himself falling in love with Ruth, which simultaneously helps him garner a better understanding of the twins' relationship while also putting himself in considerable peril. With the aid of impressively seamless special effects devised by the legendary Eugen Schüfftan (Metropolis), Olivia de Havilland gives a virtuoso performance as both sisters, only revealing their very different personalities when they're alone together: one warm and loving, the other an ice-cold murderess. SPECIAL EDITION CONTENTS: High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation transferred from original film elements Uncompressed mono 1.0 PCM audio soundtrack Optional English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing Commentary by film historian Adrian Martin Noah Isenberg on The Dark Mirror, the author and scholar provides a detailed analysis of the film The Dark Mirror (1950), a condensed radio play adaptation starring Olivia de Havilland International poster gallery Trailer for Siodmak's other 1946 film noir, The Killers Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Scott Saslow

  • Only Angels Have Wings (1939) [DVD] [2018]Only Angels Have Wings (1939) | DVD | (01/10/2018) from £5.00   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £N/A

    Cary Grant, Jean Arthur and Rita Hayworth star in this classic drama directed by Howard Hawks. As the San Luis ship docks into the port of Barranca to deliver supplies, cabaret singer Bonnie Lee (Arthur) seizes the opportunity to take a look around. While exploring the town she meets a group of American pilots who risk their lives on a daily basis to fly cargo planes over the Andes. As Bonnie gets to know pilot Geoff (Grant) and sparks between them fly, Geoff faces the difficult decision of whether to commit to his new love, giving up his one passion in life: his job.

  • Pocketful Of Miracles [1961]Pocketful Of Miracles | DVD | (03/05/2004) from £9.43   |  Saving you £3.56 (27.40%)   |  RRP £12.99

    Impoverished Broadway peddler ""Apple Annie"" (Bette Davis) has a problem. Her daughter Louise (Ann-Margret) educated abroad since infancy is coming for a visit and bringing her wealthy fianc with her. The problem is that Louise has believed all her life that Annie's a wealthy dowager and the poor old woman doesn't know what to do! Enter ""Dave The Dude"" (Glenn Ford) - a big-hearted racketeer - who enlists aid to pass Annie off as a high-society grande dame so Louise can marry her fa

  • High Noon [1952]High Noon | DVD | (13/10/2008) from £13.48   |  Saving you £-3.49 (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    The story of a man who was too proud to run. On the day Lawman Will Kane trades in his tin star for his beautiful bride news arrives that a killer he helped send to jail is returning on the noon train to seek revenge. At the behest of his friends and concerned for his new bride's safety they quickly leave town to avoid a confrontation. But Cooper realises they'll never run far enough away and heads back to town to face the killer. But when Kane tries to drum up support one by one the townspeople he had protected turn their backs on him... until Kane stands alone to face four killers on the deserted streets of town in one of the most famous showdowns ever!

  • Stagecoach (John Wayne) [1939]Stagecoach (John Wayne) | DVD | (05/06/2006) from £12.98   |  Saving you £N/A (N/A%)   |  RRP £9.99

    One of the all time classic Westerns - considered by many to be the movie that propelled John Wayne to stardom back in 1939. The film is set against the impressive backdrop of Monument Valley in Utah and tells the story of a mixed group of travellers who are making their way across country to Arizona. They are endangered by an Indian War Party and this along with their various characters results in difficulties for the party...

  • It's a Wonderful Life - 65th Anniversary Edition [DVD]It's a Wonderful Life - 65th Anniversary Edition | DVD | (02/11/2009) from £11.49   |  Saving you £9.49 (111.65%)   |  RRP £17.99

    Now perhaps the most beloved American film, It's a Wonderful Life was largely forgotten for years, due to a copyright quirk. Only in the late 1970s did it find its audience through repeated TV showings. Frank Capra's masterwork deserves its status as a feel-good communal event, but it is also one of the most fascinating films in the American cinema, a multilayered work of Dickensian density. George Bailey (played superbly by James Stewart) grows up in the small town of Bedford Falls, dreaming dreams of adventure and travel, but circumstances conspire to keep him enslaved to his home turf. Frustrated by his life, and haunted by an impending scandal, George prepares to commit suicide on Christmas Eve. A heavenly messenger (Henry Travers) arrives to show him a vision: what the world would have been like if George had never been born. The sequence is a vivid depiction of the American Dream gone bad, and probably the wildest thing Capra ever shot (the director's optimistic vision may have darkened during his experiences making military films in World War II). Capra's triumph is to acknowledge the difficulties and disappointments of life, while affirming--in the teary-eyed final reel--his cherished values of friendship and individual achievement. It's a Wonderful Life was not a big hit on its initial release, and it won no Oscars (Capra and Stewart were nominated); but it continues to weave a special magic. --Robert Horton

  • It's A Wonderful Life [DVD]It's A Wonderful Life | DVD | (17/11/2014) from £5.39   |  Saving you £14.60 (73.00%)   |  RRP £19.99

    Now perhaps the most beloved American film, It's a Wonderful Life was largely forgotten for years, due to a copyright quirk. Only in the late 1970s did it find its audience through repeated TV showings. Frank Capra's masterwork deserves its status as a feel-good communal event, but it is also one of the most fascinating films in the American cinema, a multilayered work of Dickensian density. George Bailey (played superbly by James Stewart) grows up in the small town of Bedford Falls, dreaming dreams of adventure and travel, but circumstances conspire to keep him enslaved to his home turf. Frustrated by his life, and haunted by an impending scandal, George prepares to commit suicide on Christmas Eve. A heavenly messenger (Henry Travers) arrives to show him a vision: what the world would have been like if George had never been born. The sequence is a vivid depiction of the American Dream gone bad, and probably the wildest thing Capra ever shot (the director's optimistic vision may have darkened during his experiences making military films in World War II). Capra's triumph is to acknowledge the difficulties and disappointments of life, while affirming--in the teary-eyed final reel--his cherished values of friendship and individual achievement. It's a Wonderful Life was not a big hit on its initial release, and it won no Oscars (Capra and Stewart were nominated); but it continues to weave a special magic. --Robert Horton

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