Passport To Pimlico DVD

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An archaic document found in a bombsite reveals that the London district of Pimlico has for centuries technically been part of France. The local residents embrace their new found continental status seeing it as a way to avoid the drabness austerity and rationing of post-war England. The authorities do not however share their enthusiasm... A whimsical and charming British film 'Passport To Pimlico' is one of the finest examples of the classic Ealing comedies.

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Released
13 November 2006
Directors
Actors
Format
DVD 
Publisher
Optimum Home Entertainment 
Classification
Runtime
80 minutes 
Features
PAL 
Barcode
5060034576600 
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An unexploded bomb goes off in Pimlico uncovering documents which reveal that this part of London in fact belongs to Burgundy in France An autonomous state is set up in a spirit of optimism but the petty squabbles of everyday life soon shatter the Utopian vision of a non-restrictive nation This Ealing classic earned an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay   Actors Stanley Holloway Basil Radford Hermione Baddeley Paul Dupuis John Slater Directors Henry Cornelius Producers Michael Balcon Format PAL Language English Region Region 2 Aspect Ratio 43 - 1331 Number of discs 1 Classification U Studio Ealing studios DVD Release Date 13 Nov 2006 Run Time 80 minutes

An unexploded bomb goes off in Pimlico, uncovering documents which reveal that this part of London in fact belongs to Burgundy in France. An automonous state is set up in a spirit of optimism, but the petty squabbles of everyday life soon shatter the Utopian vision of a non-restrictive nation. This Ealing classic earned an Oscar nomination for Best Screenplay.

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